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Water Test Results

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beeramI

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Hi,
I had my water tested. I brew on a H.E.R.M.S system. Should I be adding anything to my current water profile? The beer I make seems fine but am I missing something? Any input is appreciated. Thanks.

Water Test Results

pH 7.4

Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) Est, ppm 154

Electrical Conductivity, mmho/cm 0.26

Cations / Anions, me/L 2.4 / 2.2

ppm

Sodium, Na 14

Potassium, K 2

Calcium, Ca 32.24

Magnesium, Mg 1

Total Hardness, CaCO3 84

Nitrate, NO3-N 0.1 (SAFE)

Sulfate, SO4-S 13

Chloride, Cl 16

Carbonate, CO3 < 1.0

Bicarbonate, HCO3 58

Total Alkalinity, CaCO3 48

Total Phosphorus, P 0.20

Total Iron, Fe < 0.01 "<" - Not Detected / Below Detection Limit
 

Gnomebrewer

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That's pretty good brewing water. Great straight up for lagers (you might want some acid in the mash to lower mash pH for pale lagers).
For ales, you should try boosting your Calcium with Calcium chloride and/or Gypsum (Calcium sulphate). Some acid in pale ales would also help with mash pH.
 

Dgallo

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Good base to adjust from everything Is relatively low so you won’t run into a lot of issues adjusting
 

mabrungard

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Pretty good starting point. The only thing that isn't correctable is the modest level of sulfate in that water (39 ppm, assuming its still reported as Sulfur). The only time when that could be a problem is when brewing a delicate malty lager. Otherwise, you're good to go. Do recognize that you'll need to acidify that water for many brews.
 
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beeramI

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Thank you all for the input. I'll try to acidify the water and lower the ph a little. I appreciate you all taking the time to respond.
 

Robert65

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Thank you all for the input. I'll try to acidify the water and lower the ph a little. I appreciate you all taking the time to respond.
Just to be clear, it's not the water pH you're concerned with, but the mash pH. Water pH is pretty well irrelevant. You can use one of the many calculators or spreadsheets to help with adjusting the mash pH by planning mineral and acid additions to suit your grain bill and existing water. If you already got that, never mind. Happy brewing , that is easy water to deal with!
 
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beeramI

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Just to be clear, it's not the water pH you're concerned with, but the mash pH. Water pH is pretty well irrelevant. You can use one of the many calculators or spreadsheets to help with adjusting the mash pH by planning mineral and acid additions to suit your grain bill and existing water. If you already got that, never mind. Happy brewing , that is easy water to deal with!
Thanks. I'll make sure I test during the mash. I was in the habit of just putting 5.2 PH stabilizer in. I feel like that is a blind call. I want to make my good beer great.
 

ScrewyBrewer

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Thanks. I'll make sure I test during the mash. I was in the habit of just putting 5.2 PH stabilizer in. I feel like that is a blind call. I want to make my good beer great.
When testing your mash pH take a wort sample at 30 minutes into the mash. Then for best results let the sample cool to room temperature before taking your pH reading. And feel free to post your results here and share your experience.
 

ajdelange

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Pretty good starting point. The only thing that isn't correctable is the modest level of sulfate in that water (39 ppm, assuming its still reported as Sulfur). The only time when that could be a problem is when brewing a delicate malty lager. Otherwise, you're good to go. Do recognize that you'll need to acidify that water for many brews.
39 isn't that bad for that kind of beer though I would certainly prefer it lower. It can easily be lowered by dilution e.g. 1:1 with RO would get it down to around 20 which certainly should be OK. And it would also drop the alkalinity to 24. A little calcium chloride to get the chloride back up and he should be in good shape.
 
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