Water Question

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TexasTea

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I am using my well water for my first batch of ale. I can use the water after the sand filter and BUT prior to the calcite tank (which brings the pH up to about 8).
It tastes better to me before the calcite tank, so I was going to use that. It's what I normally drink.

Or I can use the water AFTER the calcite tank.

I had the water analyzed at a lab (I do that periodically) and here are the specs.

Before calcite tank- Alkalinity 100 ppm, pH 6.5, Total Hardness -100 ppm as Calcium Carbonate- I was going to use this because it tastes better to me, slightly acidic and its not as hard.

After calcite tank - Alkalinity 200 ppm, pH 8.0, Total Hardness -190 ppm as Calcium Carbonate

What do you guys think?
 
What do you guys think?

I am not familiar with a calcite tank (other than a minute of Googling). Based on the numbers you show, your untreated water looks better for brewing. Water pH is not a real issue, but high levels of Alkalinity can be a challenge (unless you really like brewing stouts). Do you have numbers for other ions like Calcium, Magnesium, Sodium, Sulfate and Chloride?
 
Thanks CascadesBrewer.
I have these numbers. Most were below the threshold of detection for the test except for chloride
chloride - 150 ppm
copper < 0.05 ppm
Iron/Fe3+ < 0.05 ppm
Nitrate + Nitrites total < 1.01 ppm
Nitrates < 1.00 ppm
 
Your water looks good to brew with either way. Good to see iron was not detectable. If I were you, I might use pre-treated water for most beers, post-treated for dark brown to black beers (since dark roasted malts are acidic).
 
I am using my well water for my first batch of ale. I can use the water after the sand filter and BUT prior to the calcite tank (which brings the pH up to about 8).
It tastes better to me before the calcite tank, so I was going to use that. It's what I normally drink.

Or I can use the water AFTER the calcite tank.

I had the water analyzed at a lab (I do that periodically) and here are the specs.

Before calcite tank- Alkalinity 100 ppm, pH 6.5, Total Hardness -100 ppm as Calcium Carbonate- I was going to use this because it tastes better to me, slightly acidic and its not as hard.

After calcite tank - Alkalinity 200 ppm, pH 8.0, Total Hardness -190 ppm as Calcium Carbonate

What do you guys think?
Have you plugged all the water values into a software program that makes suggestions based on your starting water and brew style ? (It might suggest adding a few grams of minerals like gypsum and Epsom salts and calcium ??? Something-ate.

I am totally confused on the water subject and merely doing split batch A / B tasting - better with or without additives. My source water is already very good and I can not tell the difference in most beer style experiments
 
I was going to use this thread to demonstrate the problems we can have with "off grid" water supplies. Instead, I find it is impossible for anybody to be giving advice on the information provide ... except: Provide some clearer information! (Such as @CascadesBrewer asked for).

https://www.homebrewtalk.com/thread...-291-hco3-239-alkalinity.730671/post-10383012
Meh... this is the beginner's forum. Let's not scare a new brewer on water issues when the water tastes alright, and has reasonable hardness and alkalinity, and no metals. If it's good enough for drinking, it's good enough for brewing with. No need to make it complicated at this point. Let the person brew a few batches first, and ask more questions later IF there are problems. Which there won’t be, I’m about 95% sure of this.
 
Meh... this is the beginner's forum. ...
So it is. So, the advice should be: Don't believe what the water reports they're giving you are telling you (and making you pay money for no doubt) ... they're utter garbage!

You've successfully convinced me that the brewing community badly needs a "Defuddler" to combat commerce-backed criminals providing duff information.

And, as a beginner, just brew the beer, don't get carried away with all this "water" nonsense.
 
Thanks Guys. I trust the lab I use. Same one that tests the municipal water (which is also from a well). Anyway I'm going to brew and see what happens. I'll let you know how it goes.
 

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