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Water profile for Belgian Wit

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Hartwa

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Hi guys...

Need some help with bru'n water....i am using "brussels" for the target profile.

I have not paid too much attention to my water making this in the past and I want to see if there is a benefit by making some adjustments per this spresdsheets recomendations.

My well water is soft:
>ph 5.8
>ca 12 ppm
>mg 4 ppm
>na 5 ppm
>so4 6 ppm
>cl 20 ppm
>Bicarb 3 ppm
Total hardness of 46

I can't seem to manage my additions to get the alkailinity to come in without sending my mash ph too high.

6.3 gallons mash, 10lbs 2 row, 8lbs white wheat 2 lbs flaked oats...

I make 10 gallon batches.

Anyone want to recommend how I should adjust my water?

Thanks for the help...
 

Franktalk

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I make many wits for my wife, and I have soft water also. I use Bru'nwater and follow the yellow dry profile. I add gypsum for 105 ppm of so4 and just a touch of calcium chloride to bring the cl up to about 50 ppm. Comes out great; tastes just like Allagash White.
 
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Hartwa

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Thanks for the reply...seems like i get too bitter when i am that high in SO4...i want to try to match the water from the region if i can.
 

mabrungard

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Sulfate does not make beer bitter. It makes your perception of the beer, drier. If your beer is too bitter, you over-bittered it.
 
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Hartwa

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What about lactic acid? I have read that it is needed in a wit to give it the characteristic flavor. My water is already acidic and when i use bru'n water with my grain bill...i would need to add pickling lime to keep the ph above 5.2.
 

Franktalk

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I've never heard anything about adding lactic acid to a wit, nor have I ever done it. The wit yeast, 3944, will give the characteristic flavor and mouthfeel. I think you are confusing wit with Berlinerweisse.
 
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Hartwa

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The previous poster mentioned it in another post....i just ordered some it will be here tomorrow. Maybe i mis read it. Hopefully mabrungard will clarify.

Popped my yeast bag today....starter tomorrow night and hopefully brew sunday night
 

Reneauj62

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I made a great Witbier a month ago and it is fantastic. CA 16, Mg 10, Na 0, SO4 17, CL 17, HCO3 10, Alk 7.9, Hardness 14.2, and RA -6.27
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mabrungard

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All continental European beers should be brewed with some form of lactic acid. Acid malt, saurergut, or lactic acid are options.

In a Wit, the amount of lactic is going to be small unless you're starting with a very alkaline water source. Brewing a Wit with RO water is going to only need a bit of lactic to get the very pale grist of a Wit down to the desirable range. I used to make a very nice Wit when I was brewing in Tallahassee with the tap water. I think it had about 140 ppm bicarb in it and the lactic amount was not notable in the beer.
 
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Hartwa

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Thanks everyone...i think i might break my 10 gal brew day into two 5 gallon and experiment with the water a bit.
 

mashpaddled

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I think the style needs a soft water profile. A little acidity will help build structure you won't have with tannins or dryness like most styles.
 

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