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The Pol

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So I have to build my brew water from RO, which is fine. I have a water calculator that will tell me what salts and in what quantities I need to hit a certain profile. BUT, where do I find profiles for different beers? The program has alot of profiles, but they mean nothing to me... I mean, what is good for Heffes? Porters? Stouts? Any place to find them?
 

FlyGuy

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There doesn't seem to be a ton of information about water profile and beer styles, although Ray Daniels' "Designing Great Beers" is an excellent reference. He talks about many (not all) styles, and has some discussion of water.

Another tip is to look at water profiles for famous brewing cities and link their water to their associated beer. Part of the reason they are famous for that style of beer is their water is particularly suited to that style (usually). A good discussion can be found in Palmer's "How to Brew":
http://howtobrew.com/section3/chapter15-2.html

Probably the most straightforward tip is to estimate it by the grainbill. The amount of specialty and roasted grains that you include in a recipe really influence the pH of the mash, which is what a lot of water treatment comes down to. For example, really light pilsners, light lagers, or blonde ales typically require soft water that is low in alkalinity. On the other hand, big, dark beers really acidify the mash, so hard, alkaline water is often used to balance it. So a rough rule of thumb is to look at the colour of the wort, and use that as a guide to the residual alkalinity required in your brew water.

Palmer has a REALLY handy little nomograph for this, and it can be found here:
http://www.howtobrew.com/images/f83.pdf

Just plug in the key components of your water profile, and it will tell you what type of beer you are best suited to. Palmer also discusses easy ways to use the nomography to help you make adjustments to your water for darker or lighter brews. Details are here:
http://howtobrew.com/section3/chapter15-3.html

Of course, if you just use spring water instead, you could probably get by for most beers, especially if you threw in a little Five Star 5.2 pH stabilizer too. But that might not be as fun!
 

Tonedef131

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What do you use as your water calculator. I am getting everything together to go all grain, and this is one of the things I am looking for. Do programs like Promash have this in them?
 

jdoiv

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Hey Pol, what program are you running? If it's Promash, I have most of the ideal water profiles saved and can email them to you. PM me if you want them.
 

jdoiv

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Tonedef131 said:
What do you use as your water calculator. I am getting everything together to go all grain, and this is one of the things I am looking for. Do programs like Promash have this in them?
Yes, Promash has a water profiler in it. You can enter your water profile and then pick one you want to match in the profiler and play around with different salt additions to change to water to match what you are trying for.
 

Homebrewjosh

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Tonedef131 said:
What do you use as your water calculator. I am getting everything together to go all grain, and this is one of the things I am looking for. Do programs like Promash have this in them?
download brewwater 3.0 its FREE :mug: http://home.elp.rr.com/brewbeer/

also if you thinking of going all-grain buy beersmith. 20bucks. It is a great investment i wish I would have bought it a long time ago. Promash is a great program. Do what works best for you

cheers
 

clayof2day

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Also, remember that you may not want to design water around a specific region as people often have to make water adjustments (typically acid aditions) to those waters. Unfortunately, though, the waters in the regions lend distinct flavors. I think designing water around residual alkalinity for mash pH (i.e. chapter 15 of John Palmers How to Brew) and getting ballpark to mineral content for a region is the best way to go.
 
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The Pol

The Pol

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I have Pro Mash, but it does not CALCULATE your salt additions to get the correct profile... the software I am running now will allow you to choose the profile you want, tell it what your current profile is, and then it will tell you exactly how many grams of each salt to add to your water. It will also tell you what ammount of acid you have to add to your water to correct your PH. ProMash does not do this, it will allow you to make salt additions and tell you what the result will be, but it is nearly impossible for you to guess what additions to make. My calculator, does it all on its own. I use BreWater 3.0
 

jdoiv

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Ah, ok. I think we may have misunderstood your question. And it is going to vary from recipe to recipe. Hefe's from the Weihenstephan region use the Munich/Dublin water profile. However this water really isn't the best for Hefe's. You'll have to do some work on the water to get it to work right. As clay said above, it's best to look at residual alkalinity and the grist of your mash to determine what is going be best for what you are brewing. Starting off with what region the beer style evolved from is usually a good start, but you need to research the style a little to see what the brewers do to alter/compensate for the water.
 
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