Water Filter Setup

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johnsma22

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After reading a few threads on water filters, and wanting to get the chloromines out of my water, I decided to assemble one that I could easily set up and move around for different tasks. Since I was able to get everything I needed for this setup from one place (Lowe's), I thought I would post the project with pics, part numbers and prices.

DSC02425.jpg


From left to right:

Manufacturer--------------------Part#----------------Price

Gilmore water shutoff------------AS1FFMGF----------------$6.98
Watts swivel hose adapter----------A662-------------------$4.96
Gilmore 2 piece QD----------------09QCGF-----------------$5.88
Watts tapped hose adapter---------A665-------------------$3.82
Whirlpool House Filter-----------WHCF-DWH---------------$20.57
Whirlpool Filter .5 micron-------WHCF-DB1----------------$14.68
Lasco 3/4" male pvc adapter----------------------------------$.27
Lasco 3/4" 90˚ pvc elbow--------------------------------------$.28
Length of 3/4" pvc remant pipe-------------------------------$.50

DSC02426.jpg


There are many combinations of ways to connect the supply hose to the filter. I went with this setup because I wanted to have a shutoff right at the filter and be able to quickly disconnect the supply hose from the filter for use in other tasks.

DSC02427.jpg


I chose this filter housing because it was relatively inexpensive and has 3/4" stainless steel threaded inserts to install the fittings into. This has the benefit of eliminating the risk of cracking the filter housing if the fittings are screwed in too tight.

DSC02428.jpg


The Lowe's I went to didn't have cpcv so I went with standard pvc. As this is a cold water only setup cpvc was not nesssesary. I didn't glue the joints, they are just press fit and very tight, but I don't hang the until from it anyway, I just hold it while filling. I saw in a previous thread that someone had made up some bent pieces of aluminum stock and screwed them to the filter housing. This allowed them to hang the unit onto whatever they were filling without having to hold it. I think I will look into doing that as well.
 
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johnsma22

johnsma22

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DSC02429.jpg


This .5 micron carbon filter is probably overkill. They also had a 2 micron carbon filter that was cheaper, but I went with this one. Any 10" cartridge will work with this housing.

DSC02430.jpg


And here is the finished assembly. It chimes in at a total of $58 + tax. I also chose to go with a 25' length of 1/2", FDA approved, food grade Marine/RV hose. It added another $12 to the total. It's probably not necessary because the filter would remove any garden hose odors, but I figured, what the heck. I hope this helps make it easier for someone to quickly gather up the stuff they need to assemble something like this. We all know how frustrating it can be to stare at the wall of fittings trying to find what we need.
 
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johnsma22

johnsma22

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Yes, it was yours that inspired me to go and assemble my own. I couldn't remember who it was that posted it, but I credited you in my post, in that I really liked the idea of the aluminum flat stock used as a hanger. I will be doing that.

The only think I wanted to change about your design was the barbed fittings and short piece of tubing with the hose clamps. Like I said in my post, there are many different combinations of fittings that can be used to connect the water supply to the filter housing. After staring at the fitting wall in Lowe's for awhile I found the fittings I needed to make a hard connection without the use of any soft tubing.

I do thank you for giving me the idea!
 

clayof2day

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Filter looks great, but I have one concern. You mention that you want to filter our Chloramines and I'm pretty sure these carbon filters won't do that for you. Chorline for sure, but not chloramines. That's what I've heard, but I hear wrong things all the time.
 
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Pretty sure they can. Looked up chlormine filters and they list the same ones for chlorine as they do for chloromine.

EDIT: Correction. You need a catalytic carbon filter to break the chlorine/ammonia bond. But this leaves the ammonia free from what I hear:

In addition to the effectiveness concerns regarding the removal of chlorine, is the issue of chloramine. Very few carbon filters can remove chloramine. The chlorine-ammonia bond prevents standard carbon from removing the chlorine. Some new carbon filter units are now using a special "Catalytic" Activated Carbon. This catalytic carbon can break the chlorine-ammonia bond, and absorb the chlorine. BUT! They leave the ammonia free, which we've already said is a bad thing. I've seen one tap-water filter that added a special ammonia absorbing compound (zeolite) in addition to the carbon. But zeolite has a fairly small ammonia absorbing capacity so it needs frequent replacement, and it isn't found in any common tap-water filters. Without the additional ammonia absorbing compounds, you must use some other treatment to remove the ammonia.

http://www.waterfiltersonline.com/chloramines-removal-water-filters.asp

Are you sure your water dept uses chloramine?
 

seawort

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I love threads like this where people actually list their parts and possible design variations.
Thanks much.
 

KeithLovesBeer

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this warning and how to work around chloramines is in a Washington DC Water and Sewage Authority publication:

... primary disinfection using free
chlorine, secondary disinfection
with chloramines through the
addition of ammonia, and
corrosion control with
orthophosphate.
Chloramines are a federally
approved alternative to free
chlorine. Chloramines must be
removed from water used for
kidney dialysis or aquariums.
Please contact your physician or
kidney dialysis center for the
appropriate water treatment
process. Contact your local
pet store for the appropriate water
treatment for fish tanks.
 

adx

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There are a lot of different ways to remove Chloramine. The ones I have seen before are Vitamin C and using metabusulfite. If you used one of those methods before the filter, then the charcoal would be able to remove the Chlorine ions.
 

MrFebtober

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very nice filter setups. I hadn't pictured such filters being used so simply as a hose attachment.

Are chloromines known to negatively affect beer quality or the fermentation process? Wikipedia didn't provide much insight on the subject, but I was just wondering why it's important to remove them.
 

Mustangj

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I built on one of those 3 week ago and made 2 beer. Will see if there is any off taste any different.
 

kmudrick

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MrFebtober said:
very nice filter setups. I hadn't pictured such filters being used so simply as a hose attachment.

Are chloromines known to negatively affect beer quality or the fermentation process? Wikipedia didn't provide much insight on the subject, but I was just wondering why it's important to remove them.

Depends on your definition of negative. If you think beer that comes out tasting like plastic (my experience) then yeah.. pretty negative :)

I switched to spring water.. but this would probably definitely be cheaper in the long run.
 

AceKessler

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Thanks for posting! I was wondering how you store the filter when not in use and how long it lasts? Thanks!!!
 

z987k

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I always figured the boiling process removed the chlorine and other treatment things aside from minerals from the water... not true?
 

Mustangj

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AceKessler said:
Thanks for posting! I was wondering how you store the filter when not in use and how long it lasts? Thanks!!!


I take it apart to empty it and to dry out the filter untill next time.

The next time i use it i'll drink the water before I brew.

I have only used it twice. Two brews in two days.
 

RichBrewer

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Here's what I came up with for water filter. I wanted it to hook up to the sink so I found a hose thread adapter that threads into the spigot on the sink. I used the higher grade vinyl tubing instead of garden hose. I have to thank Dude for the filter body. He brought it with him to last year's NHBC and we used it for an oak Randall. Dude gave it to me after and I just didn't have a use for it until now. :mug:
I just got done filling 10 gallon jugs for tomorrows brew and I love it! I used to filter the water from my refrigerator and that tool a long time. Also, the filter for my fridge is over $60 and I was able to get 2 carbon filters for this set up for $10!
Oh and thanks johnsma22 for the idea!
Water_Filter.JPG
 

JVD_X

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RichBrewer...

Have you considered installing that filter permanently in your line? That way you don't need to have it sitting in the sink. Depending on where you brew you could simply run a hose directly to the kettle from the faucet. You would also have clean water for drinking and other uses.

One has to wonder if it wouldn't just be worthwhile to install it like it supposed to be installed... as a whole house filter. I think you only need to change it every 3 months and they are CHEAP.

Personally - I also use the same whole house filter between the kettle and the fermenter (5 micron spun fiber) and it keeps everything out of my pump and most of the break material out of the fermenter. I just toss the filter as it is completely clogged.
 

Bobby_M

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You spend $3 on every batch on a spun filter for break material? I have to say, that's rather wasteful and I don't think it's worth the money or trouble. You'd be better off using hop bags and letting the cold break get into the fermenter.
 

DIY Brewing Company

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I just use a water filter that is for filtering water for your fridge. I put an adapter to run it inline with my water hose. It is really simple and easy. I use a potable water hose to run from my tap to the filter then I use a barb to connect it to my tubing. I will post pictures tomorrow for you.
 

Bobby_M

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The reason I prefer the housing, even though it's a little more money upfront, is that the replaceable carbon cartridges are like $8 a pair at Walmart. Over the long term, it's much cheaper and you can actually see the condition of the filter.
 

Slappy White

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heading to lowe's tomorrow...been needing a filter for awhile now...thanks for the part list...definitely will make it easier.
 

newbeerpig

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Lowes is the way to go, I tried putting the same thing together at Home Depot and I couldn't come close on cost, the filter assembly alone was $30 plus. Guess I will be making the trip tomorrow to the hardware store again, oh darn :) Thanks for the part list, it will sure save a person time.
 

newbeerpig

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I was looking at that one as well, the only downside I see is it is a 10 micron filtration which is good if your water has sediment in it but not so much if you are trying to get other nasties out. The set-up on this thread uses a .5 micron filter which should get you some pretty good water from the tap. Your call depending on your water quality, the morebeer filter is nice especially since it is already assebled.
 

BlackNotch

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Lowes is the way to go, I tried putting the same thing together at Home Depot and I couldn't come close on cost, the filter assembly alone was $30 plus. Guess I will be making the trip tomorrow to the hardware store again, oh darn :) Thanks for the part list, it will sure save a person time.

I just made my set up from Home Depot, the GE "drinking water" housing costs over $30, but I bought the "sediment" housing for $18 and got the 5 micron filter (drinking water) for it. The only mod you have to do is trim the gaskets on the filter.
 

adx

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I just made a filter for myself today. I made a couple of changes for my setup. Instead of the quick disconnect; I just used a female hose to 3/4" watts adapter and used a 2 micron charcoal filter instead of the .5 micron filter. I already had the hose shutoff valve and the charcoal filters are only $10 for 2.

The total cost was <$30 and made the water from a regular garden hose taste awesome. This filter setup will pay for itself in ~4 batches.
 

ClaudiusB

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&#65279;Here is my brewery water filtration system.
A whole house filtration system is not possible in El Paso.
Our main water line is inside the concrete slab, each sink would require a filter.

Level_Controller_05.jpg


Level_Controller_04.jpg


Cheers,
ClaudiusB
 

wedward

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&#65279;Here is my brewery water filtration system.
A whole house filtration system is not possible in El Paso.
Our main water line is inside the concrete slab, each sink would require a filter.

Level_Controller_05.jpg

Cheers,
ClaudiusB

Cool setup - care to explain this one a bit... it seems very Frankensteinish in a very cool & useful way!
 

bendavanza

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ClaudiusB
I have to say, the pics I have seen you post, have a certain mad scientist feel about them. I love it.
I'm using a simple RV filter inline, feeding directly into the ball valve on my HLT, which is much lower than the top of the HLT on a 3 tier stand. I started using campden tablets for the chloramine removal. So far so good, I used to use straight tap.
-Ben
 

JVD_X

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You spend $3 on every batch on a spun filter for break material? I have to say, that's rather wasteful and I don't think it's worth the money or trouble. You'd be better off using hop bags and letting the cold break get into the fermenter.

It didn't bother me since I don't brew to save money but I do see your point. I did end up modifying a filter that I ripped the material out of, just leaving the cage, and wrapped window screen around it.. it's now reusable and I can use it as a hop-back as well..
 

Saccharomyces

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After doing some research I settled on these filters:

ChlorPlus 10 Advanced Carbon Block Filter Only $17.65

At 0.5 GPM they are rated to remove nearly all chloramine for 1,000 gallons. That works out to 50-100 batches. They fit in the Omnifilter housing which is $28 at Walmart. Add an RV hose and some hose QDs and you are good to go.
 

Catt22

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I've been using a cannister filter like this for several years with good results. I have it mounted on my brew tower. Here's a pic:

3455629367_127b750d78_b.jpg


The plumbing is arranged so that I can bypass the filter easily if desired. It's best to filter water slowly. How slowly, I'm not sure, but I keep it down to one gpm or a little more maybe. The bypass permits a higher flow rate for the chiller, cleanup etc.

When shopping for cartridges I came across this extruded carbon block filter. The carbon used for the filter is made from coconut shells. This is supposed to produce a better tasting water. The carbon block has a spun polyester cover that acts as a pre-filter:

KX Industries MATRIKX® +5 10"×2½" Extruded Activated Carbon Block Filter with Chlorine and 5 µ Particle Reduction - H2ODISTRIBUTORS.COM

These are a little pricey, but should last for years considering the small quantities of water that we are filtering for our beer.

One other handy accessory I use is a pressure reducer which has garden hose threads. It attaches to the faucet and limits the pressure to 50 psi max. The idea is to reduce the strain on the hoses, filter housing and fittings. You can shut the water off at the nozzle without worrying about bursting a hose or blowing a connector off which can sometimes happen. These are made for use on RV's and can be purchased at most hardware stores for under $10.

I only have a 1/2" ID hose exiting the filter. This is more than sufficient for filtering slowly like I do. The bypass is connected to a 25 ft dinking water grade hose with standard garden hose ends.

I only filter water destined for my beer (strike and sparge water). I bypass the filter for everything else.

I also remove the filter from the housing and rinse it thoroughly with cold water after use. I then let the filter air dry. Except I don't think they ever do dry completely no matter how long they sit unused. I at least feel better storing it separate from the filter housing. I only use the filtered water pre-boil, so I am not overly concerned about contamination. I would not trust it to put directly into a fermenter without boiling.
 

ClaudiusB

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catt2 wrote:
One other handy accessory I use is a pressure reducer which has garden hose threads.

Please post a picture.
My setup is equipped with a commercial pressure reducer from Grainger.
No pressure reducer with garden hose threads was available a few years ago.


Cheers,
ClaudiusB
 

Catt22

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Here ya go. It says Valterra RV Water Regulator on the label (40-50 psi):

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and a closer shot of the filter setup. I bought the regulator at Ace hardware for about $8.00 or so.
 
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I don't think you really need to go slow with those. They are designed for house pressures. I have one on the entire house (including hot water) water line and it takes a month or more before I have to change it due to chlorine.

I even tested the water with one of those swimming pool kits and it says 0 ppm.
 

Catt22

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I even tested the water with one of those swimming pool kits and it says 0 ppm.

Have you tested the unfiltered tap water? There might not be a detectable level of chlorine in your water to begin with.

Regarding the filtering rate, it was only something I read, but the filter itself is rather restrictive and will reduce the flow rate considerably. I prefer to give the filter time to do its job. I can't visualize it absorbing all it could absorb at a high flow rate. I'm seldom in that much of a hurry anyway. I filter the water while I am doing other tasks such as milling the grain and such. Waiting five or ten minutes isn't a big deal and I am heating the water while filtering it into the kettles.
 

Aspera

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A bucket of clean sand and milligram quantities of lime will remove cloramine, precipitate and then filter bicarbonates as well as removing organics and many heavy metals. No expensive plastic landfill generated.
 

Catt22

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Sounds like a lot of trouble to go through to me. What expensive plastic landfill? You mean the filter cartridge? The cartridge uses only a small amount of plastic and I've been using the same one for several years now. I would say that if one wanted to walk the talk, it might be better to refrain from brewing altogether. Think of all that CO2 that won't be released into the atmosphere contributing to the carbon load and global warming. There's some heat generated in the process too. Not to mention many of us are burning up gobs of non-renewable dinosaur gas. This is not a very green sport!
 
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