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Wanted: Fish Taco Recipe

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Schlenkerla

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Hey - Do any of you have a good fish-taco recipe. I have a ton of tilapia in my freezer. I think this might be a good species to taco-up.

Also what do you garnish with on your tacos (cabbage/slaw?)

Thanks!!!
 

Revvy

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The fish taco recipe which I use I got online 10 years ago....trouble is I can't recall the link..But looking at this one Baja Fish Tacos

It seems closest to mine, and the lime mayonaise looks like the exact recipe from the pages I printed off back then, so this may be even an updated page.

Having said that, since my stomach cannot tolerate mayonaisse type sauces/emulsions I just keep my fish tacos uber simple,

Fresh cabbage, not slaw.
A little of my favorite mexican hot sauce (cholula)
A squeeze of fresh lime.
and maybe a sprig of cilantro if I can find some.

That's it and they are awesome!!! Especially with extremely fresh fish.
 

arturo7

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I don't really have an recipes but, are you considering grilled ft's or battered and fried Baja-style?
 

Revvy

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To me Battered and fried is the only true fish taco...

The best I ever had was cooked right on a beach in Ensenada on a little portable propane fryer, with the fish not even an hour outta the water. The second best was at a little taqueteria in Ensenada with a couple of ice cold negra modella especials.
 

Revvy

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Revvy - How do you cook your fish and do you marinate or season them?
I pretty much do it just like in the recipe with no marinade, or maybe a little lime juice a bit ahead. Though I have also added a little old bay, or some chili powder to the batter on occasion.

I've always liked to keep it simple to let the fresh flavors of the fish, the lime juice, the cabbage and the cilantro shine through.....with only a hint of heat/flavoring from the cholula.

If the fish is fresh you want to be able to taste it, not an overpowering marinade. That's sort of another reason I don't see the point of the mayo, to drown the flavor in cream....

That's also why you want to get the lightest consistency if batter as possible. You really don't want the fried batter to overwhelm it either...Think light and crispy like tempura, not brown and heavy like on a corndog.
 

Mike M

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Our local BJ’s has some frozen Mahi that make great fish tacos.

I roast then peel, de-seed (most of them anyway) and cut up some jalapenos.
Add the jalapenos to some olive oil ¼ - ½ cup depending on the number of fillets.
Hot sauce (depending on how hot you like it)
Add some fresh diced garlic
Little cumin, and chilly powder and fresh cracked pepper.
Fresh cilantro and parsley
Allow the fillets to marinate in the above mixture an hour is great, but less will do in a pinch. Turn the fillets occasionally to ensure they are well covered.
Just before grilling I hit them with some lime juice.
Put them on a med – hot grill and ladle the marinate on the fillets.
After a few minutes flip them (if they don’t release from the grill they’re not ready to flip)
I like to salt the fish on the grill
Remove when flakey. Let the sit for a couple of minutes and then flake with a fork.

Soft tortilla shells with some cheddar and Monterey jack cheese, lettuce and some fresh salsa.

The kids will change their plans so they’re home for dinner when I make this dish and it disappears quickly.


Great with a couple of homebrews too.
 

jgln

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You need a recipe to make a taco? Don't you just get creative and pile on whatever you like?
 

Revvy

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You need a recipe to make a taco? Don't you just get creative and pile on whatever you like?
A great fish taco, whether Baja style or grilled is a work of art, It is the perfect balance of flavors and textures....

Most people not living in, or ever visiting Southern California, or Mexico, have no clue what it is...Whenever I mention it to people living in Michigan they've never head of this, amazing treat.

Though some chain Mexican restaurants will often have something called a "seafood" taco on the menu, which usually involves grilled shrimp or some nonsense...but I've yet to find a true fish taco anywhere outside of Mexicali.

That's why we have to resort to out own inventiveness.

:D
 

Revvy

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Here's a great tribute to the fish taco, from NPR...

In Love with the Fish Taco and Its Hometown

“Modern fish tacos emerged in the 1950s in the Baja city of either Ensenada or San Felipe; it's an ongoing debate, with both cities claiming to be the 'home' of the fish taco. From their tiny stands, street vendors in these cities produced simple, inexpensive fare fast. The fish taco was hot, fresh and delicious — the perfect combination for hungry workers and market goers.”


The fish taco is made by placing hot, crispy fried fish on a lightly charred corn tortilla then topping it with a symphony of sauces.

Having moved seven times in the past 12 years, I have two pieces of advice: (1.) Don't move seven times in 12 years. (2.) If you must, then make the seventh move to San Diego.

San Diego is America's finest city (so says our web site). It certainly has glorious weather and gorgeous beaches. It also has the fish taco.

The fish taco is to San Diego what the Philly cheese steak is to Philadelphia or the lobster roll is to Maine. In fact, if you go to a Padres game here, you are likely to see as many people eating fish tacos as hot dogs.

Like most street food, a fish taco is paradoxical: Its humble appearance belies its bliss-inducing capabilities. That's because like San Diego, the fish taco has it all: It's crispy and creamy; it's spicy and salty. It's got that elusive umami (a savoriness from the protein) that satisfies your taste buds and quells your worst hunger.

The fish taco is made by placing hot, crispy fried fish on a lightly charred corn tortilla then topping it with a symphony of sauces. A silky mayo sauce clings to the fish and contrasts delightfully with a fiery chilies de arbol sauce and a cooling avocado sauce. Then it's topped off with crunchy shredded green cabbage and a zippy pico de gallo. It's a gustatory experience as beautiful and eclectic as the place from which it originated, Baja California, Mexico.

A mere 15 miles from downtown San Diego, Baja California is an 800-mile-long peninsula renowned for its remarkably varied geography and its singular cuisine.

Though rooted in Mexican tradition, Baja cuisine is distinct from mainland Mexican cooking. Since virtually all points on the peninsula are no more than 50 miles from a body of water, seafood plays a starring role in many dishes. Also, its physical separation from mainland Mexico has allowed Baja cuisine to evolve independently.

Indeed, over centuries, many ethnic influences helped shape Baja's culinary character. Sixteenth-century Spanish explorers were enticed to colonize Baja because they believed it was an island of earthbound paradise replete with jewels. When they found neither an idyll nor a treasure, they largely abandoned it, leaving their Spanish culinary traditions to marinate with indigenous practices for the next 150 years.

In this interim, both Asian and European seafarers visited Baja on fishing and trading expeditions between the Orient and the West. What emerged was a splendid mix of Mexican, Spanish and Asian cuisines, the consummate example of which is the fish taco.

In its simplest form, a taco is a tortilla wrapped around a filling, and tortillas have been a staple of the Mesoamerican diet for centuries. Most gastronomes speculate that the fish taco emerged when Asians introduced Baja natives to the practice of deep-frying fish. When this battered fried fish was combined with traditional Mexican toppings, the fish taco was born.

Modern fish tacos emerged in the 1950s in the Baja city of either Ensenada or San Felipe; it's an ongoing debate, with both cities claiming to be the "home" of the fish taco. From their tiny stands, street vendors in these cities produced simple, inexpensive fare fast. The fish taco was hot, fresh and delicious — the perfect combination for hungry workers and market goers.

It's no surprise then that San Diego surfers heading across the border to chase the best "swell" (a word I heard countless times before I realized they were talking about waves) were some of the first people from the States to appreciate fish tacos.

Among them was Ralph Rubio, a San Diegan so smitten after his first taste, that in 1983 he opened a restaurant in Mission Beach, Calif., that specialized in fish tacos. Defying skeptics who thought Americans would find fish in a tortilla unappetizing, Rubio has now sold more than 50 million fish tacos at his 160 Rubio's Fresh Mexican Grill restaurants in California, Arizona, Colorado, Nevada and Utah.

Fish tacos are ubiquitous here. They're served at beach shacks as well as posh dining establishments, and the recipe continues to evolve. With choices ranging from grilled mahi mahi with tomatillo salsa to boiled lobster with chipotle lime butter, there really is something for everyone. The one thing that San Diegans agree on is that the best fish tacos are the ones eaten hot as you drip dry in the sun waiting for the next swell.

You don't have to move to San Diego, though, to enjoy fish tacos; heck, you don't even have to visit here (although I would highly recommend it). No matter where you live, the ingredients are easy to come by and the preparation is the same.

Keep in mind that like the cheese steak and the lobster roll, fish tacos are best enjoyed with good company and a cold beer. So invite a bunch of friends over for Baja tacos; you do the frying, they do the assembling. No china plates, no silverware, just lots of napkins.

For the record, I don't foresee an eighth move. Although I could make fish tacos anywhere, I know I'd miss the sand between my toes too much. Plus, there's something to be said for wearing flip-flops in February.
 
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Schlenkerla

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You need a recipe to make a taco? Don't you just get creative and pile on whatever you like?
I have had 3 different fish tacos before. Once in Isla Muelleres (Near Cancun) Two other times in local restaurants that were non-mexican.

This fish was always browned and seasoned in a way that made it great. I tried to replicate it but it wasn't the same.

Its a worthy discussion during lunch!!!
 

Revvy

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This is the author of that article's fave recipe.

To me it's too "saucy."

My favorite recipe for Baja fish tacos is slightly adapted from Deborah Schneider's cookbook Baja! Cooking on the Edge (Rodale 2006). To capture an authentic Baja flavor, Schneider uses a beer batter, green cabbage and several sauces. If you're short on time, add diced avocadoes instead of making the avocado sauce, and use bottled hot sauce and salsa in place of the chilies de arbol sauce and pico de gallo. All you need is a deep, wide pan for frying the fish and an open flame for warming the tortillas. Since the entire meal can be made in advance, you just have to refry the fish and warm the tortillas once your guests arrive.

Avocado Sauce

Makes 1/2 cup

1/4 ripe avocado, peeled

Pinch of salt

A few drops of lime juice

1 to 2 tablespoons water or milk

2 cilantro springs, stemmed and chopped (optional)

Place the avocado, salt and lime juice in a small food processor. Add 1 tablespoon water or milk (for a slightly creamier consistency) and pulse. Add more liquid as necessary until sauce is the consistency of thick cream. Add the cilantro and pulse until just blended.

Mayonesa Secret Sauce

Makes 1/2 cup

1/2 cup mayonnaise

1 teaspoon white vinegar

1 1/2 tablespoon water or milk

Place the mayonnaise in a small bowl and slowly stir in vinegar. Add water or milk until the sauce is thick and creamy.

Chilies de Arbol Sauce

Makes 1/2 cup

1 garlic clove, smashed with the side of a large knife

1 teaspoon canola oil

1 cup dried chilies de arbol (about 30 chilies), stemmed**

1/3 cup water

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon white vinegar

Pour canola oil in a small skillet over low heat. Add smashed garlic and cook 4 to 5 minutes until golden and aromatic. Place in a small food processor.

Wearing gloves, seed the chilies (unless you want hotter sauce, in which case, leave the seeds), and place in the processor. Process until well pulverized. Add water and salt and puree until as smooth as possible. Scrape into a bowl and add the vinegar. Let stand at least 30 minutes. Taste for seasoning, adding more salt and/or vinegar as necessary.

**Chilies de arbol are thin, red chilies about 3 inches long, and can be found in the Mexican food section of most major supermarkets or in Latin American markets. These small chilies are big on heat, so use this sauce sparingly.

Tacos

Makes 24 servings, enough for 6 to 8 people

2 cups all-purpose flour

1 1/2 teaspoon baking powder

1/2 teaspoon granulated garlic

1/4 teaspoon cayenne

1/2 teaspoon dry mustard

1/2 teaspoon dried whole Mexican oregano, rubbed to a powder*

Kosher salt

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

12 ounces (1 bottle) cold beer, plus more to thin the batter if necessary

2 pounds firm, meaty fish (I use halibut or Pacific sea bass)

A little squeeze of fresh lime juice, from 2 to 3 limes

Canola oil, for frying

Serve with:

24 (6-inch) corn tortillas, warmed (you can substitute flour tortillas, but the corn imparts a more authentic flavor)

Avocado sauce

Lime wedges

Mayonesa secret sauce

Salsa de chilies de arbol

Pico de gallo

Finely shredded green cabbage (not lettuce)

Cilantro leaves (optional)

For the batter, whisk together the flour, baking powder, garlic, cayenne, mustard, oregano and salt and pepper in a large bowl until well blended. Stir in the beer until there are no lumps. (The batter can be made several hours ahead and refrigerated.)

Cut fish into pieces the size and shape of your index finger. Sprinkle with some lime juice and salt.

Pour oil into a deep, wide pan to the depth of 2 inches and heat over medium-heat to 350 degrees (if you have a deep-fry thermometer). Otherwise, test the heat by dropping a little bit of the batter into the oil. It should quickly bounce to the surface and be surrounded by tiny bubbles.

Pat the fish dry with paper towel. Check the thickness of the batter by dipping a piece of fish in it; it should be the consistency of medium-thick pancake batter, coating the fish easily and dripping very little. Add a little beer or water if it seems too thick.

Add a few pieces of fish to the batter. Using tongs, lightly swish each piece until thoroughly coated. Remove fish, letting excess batter drip into the bowl before gently placing in the hot oil. Cook a few pieces at a time until they float and the batter is set but still light in color, about 2 to 3 minutes. If a piece sticks to the bottom of the pan, just leave it, and it will release itself.

Remove the fish to a rack to drain, reserving the frying oil. At this point the fish can be cooled and refrigerated, uncovered, if you're preparing ahead.

When you are ready to serve, reheat the oil to 350 degrees, and quickly refry the fish a few pieces at a time for about 1 minute until crisp and golden brown.

Heat tortillas on a dry griddle for 1 minute per side or, using metal tongs, simply hold over an open flame until warmed and slightly charred.

To serve, place refried fish, warmed tortillas and condiments on a table so guests can make their own tacos. To assemble tacos, hold a tortilla in your hand, and spread a spoonful of avocado sauce on it. Place a piece of fried fish on top and sprinkle with a little lime juice. Drizzle with some mayonesa sauce, a few drops of chilies de arbol sauce and some pico de gallo. Top it off with some shredded green cabbage and fresh cilantro.

*Whole Mexican oregano can be found in the Mexican food section of most major supermarkets or in Latin American markets.
 

Revvy

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Here's a baked version.

I created this recipe for a lighter, lower-calorie fish taco that doesn't sacrifice flavor. Green tomatoes (which are simply unripe red tomatoes) have a firm texture and zesty, lemony flavor, but if you can't find them, substitute tomatillos.

Makes 4 servings

Salsa

2 teaspoons fresh grated ginger

2 teaspoons cider vinegar

2 teaspoons honey

2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice, plus 1/8 teaspoon grated zest

2 teaspoons canola oil

1/2 cup red onion, diced

1 cup red bell pepper, diced

1 cup green tomato (or tomatillo), diced

2 tablespoons jalapeno pepper with seeds, diced

2 tablespoons fresh cilantro, chopped

Salt, to taste

Whisk in a small bowl ginger, vinegar, honey, lime juice and zest and set aside.

Heat oil in a medium skillet over medium heat. Add onion and cook 2 to 3 minutes until slightly browned. Add red bell pepper, green tomato and jalapeno and cook 1 to 2 minutes. Add ginger-vinegar mixture to pan and cook 1 to 2 minutes more, until slightly bubbly.

Place in a bowl and gently stir in cilantro. Season with salt.

Tacos

2 egg whites

4 (4-ounce) servings of a white fish, such as tilapia or halibut

1/2 cup coarse cornmeal or grits

Salt and pepper, to taste

8 (6-inch) whole wheat tortillas

1/4 cup cotija anejo cheese***

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

Place egg whites in a shallow bowl and lightly beat with a fork. In another shallow bowl, place cornmeal seasoned with salt and pepper.

Pat fish dry with paper towel. Dip each piece of fish in the egg whites then dredge in the cornmeal. Place on a parchment paper-lined baking sheet or baking dish coated with cooking spray. Bake at 400 degrees for about 20 minutes, turning once mid-way through. The fish will be cooked when the cornmeal becomes golden and crunchy and the fish is opaque when pierced with a fork.

To assemble tacos, heat tortillas on a dry griddle over medium heat for 1 minute per side or, using metal tongs, simply hold over an open flame until warmed and slightly charred. Place a layer of salsa on each tortilla, then some cheese, then a fish fillet. Top with more salsa and cheese. Serve immediately.

***Cotija anejo is a mild-flavored Mexican cheese with a crumbly texture that can be found in the refrigerator section of most major supermarkets or in Latin American markets. If you can't find it, queso fresco cheese is a good substitute.
 

Mutilated1

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I like the battered and fried kind best, with slaw.

the only part I have a recipe for is the tartar sauce / slaw dressing - found it in a magazine somewhere its really good and unique. can't remember what went into though other than mayo and tabasco, maybe dill reslish or soemthing like that

I'll find the recipe for you when I get home tonight
 

Revvy

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Freakin' Awesome!!! :rockin:
I'm glad you brought this up, I don't make these that often....mainly because I haven't been able to get them to taste as fresh and awesome as I remember...I think having the freshest fish is the key.

But methinks I'm due to make some, I've noticed that Trader Joe's frozen fish is of good quality....And they have Halibut, iirc..

DUDE, I think this is the dry mix from my old recipe...with the mustard powder. It is subtle and flavorful, and not overpowering.

2 cups all-purpose flour

1 1/2 teaspoon baking powder

1/2 teaspoon granulated garlic

1/4 teaspoon cayenne

1/2 teaspoon dry mustard

1/2 teaspoon dried whole Mexican oregano, rubbed to a powder*

Kosher salt

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

12 ounces (1 bottle) cold beer, plus more to thin the batter if necessary
This is delicious!!!!!!!!
 

arturo7

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One thing for certain, you gotsta use corn tortillas. Preferably heated, not right out of the bag. The traditional method uses a non-oiled* cast iron skillet with no sides. The oven or microwave is a second choice. If your feeling lazy just do it manually over the burner of a gas stove.


* (edit) One tasty variation of the cast iron method is to use an oiled skillet. Once the fish & garnish are ready, begin heating the tortilla in a puddle of oil. When you flip it, add the fish. After a few seconds fold it over. Let it cook like this for a short period then flip to get the other side. The timing of flips depends upon the skillet temp. This adds a crispiness or crunchiness to the the tortilla depending on how long you leave it on the heat.

Talk about yummy! Of course this technique is not limited to fish tacos!
 

flyangler18

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First off, I'd admit I giggle like a school girl every time I hear 'fish taco'. :p
Sophomoric and infantile, but I still laugh.

When I make mine, I like using catfish or tilapia in nice, meaty chunks. Season with a blackening spice blend of your choice and pan fry with just a touch of olive oil.

Spoon into tortillas(I prefer flour) that have been warmed in a dry pan to give a little crispiness; top with diced tomatos, creme fraiche, diced avocado, cilantro and a squeeze of a lime wedge.

Might have to make those for dinner tonight. :D
 

jgln

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I have had 3 different fish tacos before. Once in Isla Muelleres (Near Cancun) Two other times in local restaurants that were non-mexican.

This fish was always browned and seasoned in a way that made it great. I tried to replicate it but it wasn't the same.

Its a worthy discussion during lunch!!![/QUOTE]

No argument there. We either have tacos or wings every Friday or Saturday night. I am not much of a fish eater (tuna fish sandwich here/there) but when we make tacos we are always experimenting with differnt things but a fairly hot hot sauce is a must.
 

kjung

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Here's the recipe that I use. I usually use Cod, but tilapia will probably work, too. SWMBO, and even the kids, three out of four who HATE fish, scarfed it all down.

1 lime, juiced
1 tablespoon tequila
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon black pepper
12 ounces cod or firm white fish, cut in 1-inch pieces
16 (8-inch) corn tortillas
Canola oil
4 ounces tempura flour
8 ounces prepared tempura batter made with cold water
6 ounces panko bread crumbs


Directions
In medium bowl, combine lime juice, tequila, cumin, salt, and pepper; mix thoroughly. Add the fish and toss to coat. Marinate for 10 minutes.

Warm tortillas on grill or pan. Cover with a towel to keep warm.

In a medium Dutch oven, heat the canola oil to 350 degrees F.

Remove fish from marinade, shake off excess, dredge in tempura flour, and dunk in cold tempura mixed batter. Roll in panko bread crumbs, pressing panko onto fish. One by one add fish to oil, making sure to keep the fish pieces separated. Fry for 4 to 5 minutes, or until light golden brown. Remove and drain on paper towels.
 

jgln

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Hot dog taco?

I was going to heat up a couple hot dogs and throw them on some bread and decided too boring so I got some hot sauce, some cheese, chopped up some onion and pickle and then saw lettuce in the fridge and decided to cut that up too. I then had an idea to put the hot dog into a hard taco shell and wrap the bread around that like a taco bell soft/hard taco and then topped off with the above. Quite good I must say.
 
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Schlenkerla

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Sounds like drunk food to me.
When was so poor that I couldn't pay attention I'd make refried bean tacos.

Mixed taco seasoning into a can of refried beans and heated it over a skillet.

Meat substitute. Could be druck food as well.
 

jgln

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How about scrambled egg tacos? No not drinking yet, I am still at work.
 

arturo7

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This is the beautiful thing about the tortilla/taco. You can put just about anything inside, add some hot sauce and you've got a meal.

I had a meat sauce taco a couple weekends ago. Who needs pasta, right?
 

KingBrianI

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now you guys have gone and done it. after reading this thread at work today, i couldn't get fish tacos out of my head so im cooking some up right now. using local catfish ill be frying in a beer batter, made a avocado sauce and a mayo sauce, shredded some cabbage and have onion tomato and monterey jack cheese for topping. can't wait!
 

RayInUT

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I just use fish sticks from Costco for mine. They come out great (well, not as good as Rubio's in San Diego) but if you put enough guac, salsa, cabbage, and other crap on the taco you can't tell the difference anyway. That was our mainstay during lent this year.
 

Freezeblade

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on a flour tortilla? nooooooo. IMHO fish tacos should be on corn tortillas, preferably fresh right from the local tortilla factory :p If you're going to use flour, make a fish burrito.

I keep my batter simple: 1/2 corn meal 1/2 flour, with a pacifico or other mexican pale beer for fluff, keep it rather thin. light corn starch on the fish, battered, pan fried in oil, garnished with a nice hot salsa, pico de gallo, lime and cabbage (the cabbage is a must), and I use Mediterranean style yogurt instead of mayonnaise or sour cream, turns out better (both for you and tasting, imho)

Happy eating.
 

arturo7

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on a flour tortilla? nooooooo. IMHO fish tacos should be on corn tortillas, preferably fresh right from the local tortilla factory :p If you're going to use flour, make a fish burrito.
.
+1 on corn tortillas

flour tortillas are just wrong, excepting burritos
 

KingBrianI

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yeah, all i had were flour tortillas, but i like them better anyway. just like beer, it's all about what you like, right?
 

SpanishCastleAle

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I plan to try this soon too...heard of em but never had em. I can def find uber-fresh fish around here...but I have some frozen Haddock I need to get rid of. Maybe I'll do my first batch with that (I bought it specifically for frying anyway).

Blackened fish tacos sound awesome but I think flyangler was the only one who mentioned that. I just love blackened fish...and chicken...and steak. Gives the propane burner something to do between brews too.

+1 on cold water for tempura batter.
+100 on Panko bread crumbs for frying fish.

Anybody tried using an asian salad made with brocolli slaw (often with a peanut butter/sesame type sauce...it's really good as a slaw/salad)?
 

Revvy

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OK, I got around to uploading the pics of my recent Fish Taco reunion.
I used the recipe I posted above, https://www.homebrewtalk.com/1279454-post18.html

I marinated the fish for about 15-20 minutes in lime juice, cumin and a couple drops of my new favorite condiment;

Chipotle Tobasco Sauce!!!



As you can see I went the traditional topping route, a squeeze of lime, some cabbage, and a hit of hot sauce, no cheese because it is a cardinal taco sin to put cheese on a SOFT taco shell.

I heated the corn tortillas briefly on a cast iron skillet with a hint of oil.



The side dish was a simple corn/black been posole.

The recipe for that is;

1 can of black beans, half the liquid drained
1 can of corn, drained
I ham steak, cubed
1 half of an onion, diced
Cumin to taste
Juice of one lime
1 half bottle of beer (preferably a lager)
Chipotle Tabasco to taste (I used approximately 2 tbs.)
Salt and pepper to taste
1Tbs chopped garlic
1 Tbs olive oil.

I tsp cornstarch dissolved in a tbs of water (as a thickener if needed.)

Saute onion and garlic in oil. Add in cubed ham and cumin, and fry ham a bit in the spices. Add in half drained can of black beans and corn.
Add 1/2 bottle of beer, squeeze in the lime juice and add tobasco sauce.

Bring to boil and reduce heat to medium simmer. Salt and pepper to taste. Cook for 10 -20 minutes. Check consistency, and if too "runny" dissolve in cornstarch/water.

It should be not too runny like pork and beans, nor too thick like chili, but should have a nice sauce, like in the picture.

Add more chipotle tabasco if desired.

Enjoy!!!
 

paulthenurse

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Revvy,
You got to stop this stuff, brother. I got more f'ing chins than a chinese phonebook and you are just killing me. If I get any fatter I'll need my own zip code. Stop with the F'ing Mexican food threads. I'm begging you.
 
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