Wanted: a good apple ale recipe

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brewman !

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I'm looking for a recipe for a heavier apple beer. Maybe an apple oatmeal or something like that. Maybe a bit lighter than that. Maybe an apple ale ? I'd love something that tasted apple pie-ish.

Can anyone recommend a recipe ?

Thanks.
 
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brewman !

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What about these recipes ? (I found there here http://ericsbeerpage.com/Beer/Recipe/fruit.html)

I like the sounds of a brown ale with apple. I wish it had some oatmeal.


Washington Apple Ale
4 lbs Telford's Yorkshire Nut Brown Ale hopped malt
1 lb honey
1/2 lb corn sugar
1/2 lb dark crystal malt
4 lbs red apples
2 teaspoons cinnamon
-In cold water place crushed dark crystal grains enclosed in a cheesecloth, and bring the water to boil. As boiling commences remove crystal malt and add Telford's. Boil for approximately 15-20 minutes. Add sugar and honey and boil for 10 more minutes. Turn down heat so that boiling stops. Add cinnamon and sliced apples to mixture and let steep for 15 minutes. Remove apples with strainer and transfer mixture to your carboy. This beer has a medium body with a hint of apple flavor. It is very smooth with little or no bitterness (that can be changed by using finishing hops).
From:Joseph Shirey




Apples in the snow
1.5 gal cold water
6.6 lbs John Bull Malt Extract Light (any brand should do)
1 lb corn sugar
2 oz Hallertauer Hops (boiling)
.5 oz Hallertauer Hops (finishing)
12 lbs apples (9lbs Granny Smith, 3lbs. Macintosh)
3.5 gal cold water with water crystals
2 pkg Ale yeast (we used Edme)
.75 cup corn sugar (for priming)
Cut up apples into 8-10 slices each (discard cores). Put 1.5 gal water, and boiling hops in pot. Bring to a boil. Add extract and 1lb corn sugar. Boil 40 minutes. Add finishing hops and apples. Let sit and steep for 15 minutes.
Take the entire wort and pour into a plastic fermenter that has water and water crystals in it. Push apples to one side, pitch yeast and stir. (This may sound scary to those of you who are paranoid about infections, but don't panic. The steeping (in boiling wort) should kill any nasties. If you are _really_ worried, simmer it and keep it at a boil. Once you put it in the fermenter, the cap is on and nothing can get in...)
We let it ferment for 3 weeks. Sparged into a handy plastic bucket, added .75c corn sugar, strred, and bottled. At this point it tasted "sweet, kinda appley (not surprising). Hops yield an interesting secondary taste. Might taste better a little cooler than 75oF." (and flat, BTW)
We let carbonate for a little under a month. Here's a quote: "Not very sweet; next time less hops. The carbonation yeasties over-carbonated at this point. The beer was kept at 60oF for the whole time."
Original.S.G. 1.050
Finished.S.G. 1.015
primary fermentation: 3 weeks.
bottle fermentation: 4 weeks.
Shannon Posniewski ([email protected])
 

Torchiest

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I was planning on brewing another belgian wit pretty soon, and adding a gallon of apple juice to it, give or take, and possibly some cinnamon. I think the spiciness of the belgian wit yeast could work really well with that combination.
 

david_42

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I've mixed cider & ale (snakebite), wasn't impressed. I am thinking about steeping a pound of caramel 60-80L for a cider this fall. I may just grind it and add it to the ferment.
 

pkaeding

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I recently made an apple ale that was reminiscent of apple pie, but also had some roasted barley to balance things out. This beer was definitely meant to be a beer first, with hints of cider, rather than a beer-cider hybrid.

I posted the recipe on my blog, if you are interested:
New England Apple Ale
 

leghorn

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pkaeding, your recipe on your blog is interesting, and now resides in my "future brew" file. I love the idea of a sliced apple through a hopback. Only change I'd make is have that one be a Granny Smith, since I am preferential to that type of apple. But I imagine changing the apple is part of the fun.

Overall, how'd it turn out?
 

mikeusru

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Hey I really want to brew pkaeding's recipe but lack the tools for a full-grain recipe. Can anyone give any advice for an extract conversion? What (and how much of it) should I use?

I've been in the mood to try an apple IPA or apple ale and this seems like the best recipe I could find.

Thanks!:mug:
 

Torchiest

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Here's the recipe I used when I did my apple ale a few years ago:

6.00 lb Wheat Liquid Extract
1.00 lb Pale Malt (2 Row) US
1.00 lb Wheat, Torrified
0.50 lb Oats, Flaked
1.00 oz Willamette [4.20 %] (60 min) Hops 13.9 IBU
1.00 oz Willamette [4.20 %] (5 min) Hops 2.8 IBU
1.00 gal Apple Juice (Primary)
1 Pkgs Belgian Ale (White Labs #WLP550)

I steeped the grains around 150º for half an hour, then added the extract, brought to boil, and did normal hop additions. Just make sure you end up with a four gallon batch at the end. I started with about 3.5 gallons pre-boil and then added one gallon of cold water to that, then added one gallon of apple juice to the primary.

Also, this could go any number of directions depending on what yeast you used. The Belgian yeast gave this quite an interesting flavor. I thought the fruitness of the yeast and the apple juice worked well together, but you could keep it more straightforward by using something like White Labs WLP001 California Ale, or even Nottingham dry yeast.
 

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