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Willy

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A while back I was advised (John Palmer) to cold crash slowly, no more than 3-5°F per day to ensure a nice foamy head on your beers.

Been doing it once I saw the results. Works great. More of a slow motion train wreck than a "crash".
 

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I wonder if the result is to simply extend the duration of the "crash" so more nucleating material can drop out.

The experiment would be to crash one fermentor as quickly as the chamber can provide but then extend the duration for as long as slow crashing the other fermentor takes to hit the same terminal temperature...

Cheers!
 
Gave AI a shot at this.

Prompt: "John Palmer to cold crash slowly, no more than 3-5°F per day to ensure a nice foamy head"

"Monica" response:
  • 🍻 Cold Crashing for Foamy Head John Palmer recommends cold crashing your beer slowly, at a rate of no more than 3-5°F per day, to ensure a nice foamy head. This is because slow cooling allows the yeast to settle out gradually, leaving behind a clearer beer with more proteins for head retention. source
  • 🌡️ Optimal Cold Crashing Temperature The ideal temperature for cold crashing is around 35°F. This temperature is low enough to encourage yeast flocculation (clumping together) without affecting the flavor or aroma of the beer. source
  • ⏰ Duration of Cold Crashing The duration of cold crashing can vary depending on the size and type of beer. Generally, it takes 2-3 days for a typical batch of beer to cold crash. source

ChatGPT response:

"Cold crashing is a method used in brewing to clarify beer by rapidly lowering its temperature after fermentation. However, it seems like you're looking for information on a specific technique related to cold crashing, involving a slow decrease in temperature to preserve a foamy head on beers.

Maintaining a foamy head while cold crashing can indeed be crucial for certain beer styles, especially those that rely on a thick, persistent foam for aroma retention and mouthfeel. The idea behind a slow cold crash is to gradually reduce the temperature, allowing carbon dioxide to remain dissolved in the beer, which helps sustain a good head retention.

To achieve this slow cold crash, brewers typically adjust the temperature of their fermentation chamber or storage vessel incrementally over several days, usually no more than 3-5°F (1.6-2.8°C) per day. This gradual decrease in temperature minimizes the risk of sudden carbon dioxide release, which could result in a loss of carbonation and subsequently a less foamy head.

By controlling the cold crash in this manner, brewers can help ensure that their beers maintain the desired level of carbonation and foam quality, contributing to a more enjoyable drinking experience."

I'm left wondering if either of those responses are accurate...

Cheers!
 
Gave AI a shot at this.

Prompt: "John Palmer to cold crash slowly, no more than 3-5°F per day to ensure a nice foamy head"

"Monica" response:
  • 🍻 Cold Crashing for Foamy Head John Palmer recommends cold crashing your beer slowly, at a rate of no more than 3-5°F per day, to ensure a nice foamy head. This is because slow cooling allows the yeast to settle out gradually, leaving behind a clearer beer with more proteins for head retention. source
  • 🌡️ Optimal Cold Crashing Temperature The ideal temperature for cold crashing is around 35°F. This temperature is low enough to encourage yeast flocculation (clumping together) without affecting the flavor or aroma of the beer. source
  • ⏰ Duration of Cold Crashing The duration of cold crashing can vary depending on the size and type of beer. Generally, it takes 2-3 days for a typical batch of beer to cold crash. source

ChatGPT response:

"Cold crashing is a method used in brewing to clarify beer by rapidly lowering its temperature after fermentation. However, it seems like you're looking for information on a specific technique related to cold crashing, involving a slow decrease in temperature to preserve a foamy head on beers.

Maintaining a foamy head while cold crashing can indeed be crucial for certain beer styles, especially those that rely on a thick, persistent foam for aroma retention and mouthfeel. The idea behind a slow cold crash is to gradually reduce the temperature, allowing carbon dioxide to remain dissolved in the beer, which helps sustain a good head retention.

To achieve this slow cold crash, brewers typically adjust the temperature of their fermentation chamber or storage vessel incrementally over several days, usually no more than 3-5°F (1.6-2.8°C) per day. This gradual decrease in temperature minimizes the risk of sudden carbon dioxide release, which could result in a loss of carbonation and subsequently a less foamy head.

By controlling the cold crash in this manner, brewers can help ensure that their beers maintain the desired level of carbonation and foam quality, contributing to a more enjoyable drinking experience."

I'm left wondering if either of those responses are accurate...

Cheers!
Awesome! Thank you.
 
Gave AI a shot at this.

Prompt: "John Palmer to cold crash slowly, no more than 3-5°F per day to ensure a nice foamy head"

"Monica" response:
  • 🍻 Cold Crashing for Foamy Head John Palmer recommends cold crashing your beer slowly, at a rate of no more than 3-5°F per day, to ensure a nice foamy head. This is because slow cooling allows the yeast to settle out gradually, leaving behind a clearer beer with more proteins for head retention. source
  • 🌡️ Optimal Cold Crashing Temperature The ideal temperature for cold crashing is around 35°F. This temperature is low enough to encourage yeast flocculation (clumping together) without affecting the flavor or aroma of the beer. source
  • ⏰ Duration of Cold Crashing The duration of cold crashing can vary depending on the size and type of beer. Generally, it takes 2-3 days for a typical batch of beer to cold crash. source

ChatGPT response:

"Cold crashing is a method used in brewing to clarify beer by rapidly lowering its temperature after fermentation. However, it seems like you're looking for information on a specific technique related to cold crashing, involving a slow decrease in temperature to preserve a foamy head on beers.

Maintaining a foamy head while cold crashing can indeed be crucial for certain beer styles, especially those that rely on a thick, persistent foam for aroma retention and mouthfeel. The idea behind a slow cold crash is to gradually reduce the temperature, allowing carbon dioxide to remain dissolved in the beer, which helps sustain a good head retention.

To achieve this slow cold crash, brewers typically adjust the temperature of their fermentation chamber or storage vessel incrementally over several days, usually no more than 3-5°F (1.6-2.8°C) per day. This gradual decrease in temperature minimizes the risk of sudden carbon dioxide release, which could result in a loss of carbonation and subsequently a less foamy head.

By controlling the cold crash in this manner, brewers can help ensure that their beers maintain the desired level of carbonation and foam quality, contributing to a more enjoyable drinking experience."

I'm left wondering if either of those responses are accurate...

Cheers!
Yeah for AI. Pretty much spouting common knowledge or beliefs. This is what the future has in store for us!

I am pretty sure speed has little to do with how much yeast drops out which would not determine head retention. If one is still lagering for a period of time, the yeast will drop out. The brewing textbooks say to slowly lower fermenting beer so to keep the yeast alive and active through lagering. Sudden drops will put them to sleep and/or shock them which is a stressor resulting in possible off flavors. This is geared more towards lager beer as the traditional methods carbonate the beer during the lagering phase but still might have implications for all beer styles.

Does any of this affect head retention? I am not sure but a side by side would be a great test. And we all like tests!
 
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Anecdotal: but I noticed better head retention upon improving my wort chiller. Could've been a lot of other causes though as that was earlier in my brewing career.
 
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Ha. I have always thought slow ramp downs were associated with flavors rather than head retention. True great head retention is still kind of a mystery to me. I am always searching but it seems to be elusive.
 
although mash ph and temperature along with adding dexrin malts does affect the head. i have still found that good old maltodextrin works really really well. i stopped using it cause of the price but when i add 4 oz per5 gallons it really does give a long lasting creamy head. and its very reliable unlike mash ph temp or dextrin malts.
 
So the question is whether to be tough on your yeast or gentle to get the best head? My double blind experiments are still inconclusive.
Happy Father’s Day!
 

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