Vermouth

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luis.salas

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Shouldn't we open a thread with vermouth recipes and discussion? I can't find nothing about it in this forum.
 

bracconiere

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infusionated and fortified wine.


like i said distilled? like distilled wine made like gin with different infusinations, and added back to wine?

maybe i'm off on this....but 'fortified' means distilled wine added back to the batch right? and in this case i 'assume' the distilling is made like they make gin?
 

z-bob

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like i said distilled? like distilled wine made like gin with different infusinations, and added back to wine?

maybe i'm off on this....but 'fortified' means distilled wine added back to the batch right? and in this case i 'assume' the distilling is made like they make gin?

I think the important distinction is "they make gin". (someone else with the proper license does the distilling) Making fortified wine should be fine for discussion here; you make wine and add a little Everclear or brandy to it.

What botanicals are in vermouth anyway?
 

bracconiere

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What botanicals are in vermouth anyway?


and the most important question is asked! ;)


maybe just heat up some ever clear to 160f, or something then strain it..

quainine, and lau'b'dnum, seem of interest....


there's a start...
 

z-bob

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and the most important question is asked! ;)


maybe just heat up some ever clear to 160f, or something then strain it..

quainine, and lau'b'dnum, seem of interest....


there's a start...
I thought it was more like wormwood (but not much), anise, and nutmeg.
 

bracconiere

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I was thinking of making my own, as well as possibly steeping vodka to make a bargain gin. Here's what I found on vermouth.



what about a magnet like the people trying to dry hop in kegs? and using a pressure cooker, to steam the bag off the lid?

just get it up to temp then lower the heat to keep the steam but not vent? could be risky though.....
 

z-bob

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I bought a bottle of dry white vermouth last week when I saw it in the bargain bin at the liquor store. Wasn't sure what to do with it, so I tasted it. It was really not that herbal, and not particularly bitter. Like some kind of a premixed white wine cocktail that wasn't very good (but it wasn't bad either.) I just drank it neat over several days and won't buy it again -- at least I won't buy that brand again and won't be in a hurry to try a different brand.
 

Dr_Jeff

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I bought a bottle of dry white vermouth last week when I saw it in the bargain bin at the liquor store. Wasn't sure what to do with it, so I tasted it. It was really not that herbal, and not particularly bitter. Like some kind of a premixed white wine cocktail that wasn't very good (but it wasn't bad either.) I just drank it neat over several days and won't buy it again -- at least I won't buy that brand again and won't be in a hurry to try a different brand.

Dry vermouth is used in martinis and other drinks as well.
 

mashpaddled

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You can make vermouth at home by fortifying wine with wine-based spirit (e.g. brandy, grappa) and infusing with herbs (some are always sweetened with sugar). You don't need a still to make it. You don't even need to make wine. You could just buy the ingredients and put them together.

Unless you have a real affection for vermouth or the idea of making your own recipe it is far cheaper to buy than make. Vermouth generally is made with lower quality wine that a winery might sell of as bulk grapes or wine to another producer. You're not buying wine or grapes wholesale which makes buying even jug wine more expensive. Of course, if you grow grapes your cost is different.
 

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