Using wheat DME and maltodextrin to bottle??

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BitterBomz

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I recently brewed a Piraat clone, and it came out way too dry with hardly any sweetness. OG was 1.076, FG was 1.010. Piraat is recognized for being on the sweet side. Since the fermentation has already completed, I'm about to throw it into the secondary to let it condition. After that, bottling time. I'm thinking about using maltodextrin to add some mouthfeel, but I'm (moreover) searching for something I can use to bring up the sweetness and balance out the spiciness of the yeast and hops. Any ideas?

Also, I have never used any DME to prime. The recipe calls for 1 1/4 cup wheat DME at prime time. Not sure what flavor or sweetness effect the DME will have on the beer once it has been bottled. I know that DME is very fermentable, but I'm not experienced enough to know its priming and flavoring/sweetening charactaristics. Does anyone have a standard solution to make this? How many cups of water should I boil?:confused:
 

juzdu

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Wow, you have yourself a very strong beer there, ABV of nearly 9% before you add your priming sugar. Can you post the exact recipe you used for this beer?

In general, don't bother with DME or maltodextrin for priming, it'll add alcohol and maltiness during fermentation, but won't do much as a primer. Just use dextrose or even table sugar for priming.
 

zachattack

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DME is usually about 70-75% fermentable depending on the brand and style (as opposed to sucrose/dextrose, which are basically 100%). So it will add some sweetness and body, maybe not much though. It will certainly work as a primer, not sure why juzdu doesn't think it will? Lots of people prime with DME.

I'd use one of the online calculators to get an exact amount of DME, and add it by weight, not volume.

http://www.tastybrew.com/calculators/priming.html

:mug:
 
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BitterBomz

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zachattack said:
DME is usually about 70-75% fermentable depending on the brand and style (as opposed to sucrose/dextrose, which are basically 100%). So it will add some sweetness and body, maybe not much though. It will certainly work as a primer, not sure why juzdu doesn't think it will? Lots of people prime with DME.

I'd use one of the online calculators to get an exact amount of DME, and add it by weight, not volume.

http://www.tastybrew.com/calculators/priming.html

:mug:
Thanks, zach. I bottled a few days ago, ill let you know how the final product is.
 

juzdu

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It will certainly work as a primer, not sure why juzdu doesn't think it will? Lots of people prime with DME.

I'd use one of the online calculators to get an exact amount of DME, and add it by weight, not volume.
Sorry for the misunderstanding, but I didn't say it wouldn't work as a primer. What i meant was it won't add much/any body/flavour to the beer as opposed to using say table sugar. DME will work just as well as any other fermentable at carbonating your beer.
 
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