Using oats

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TasunkaWitko

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If I wanted to add oats to a recipe primarily for their flavor contribution ("creaminess" and/or body are secondary, but still could be a factor), what would be the best way to go about this?

Flaked? Malted? Should I toast them in the oven first? What kid of percentage should I be looking at as part of the total?

Any thoughts and guidance would be appreciated -

Ron
 

jjeffers09

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I don't think you could add it raw or toasted, I am just guessing that you would need to go through a full mash, boil, and chill it prior to adding it to a secondary. What brew are you wanting to add it to?
 
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TasunkaWitko

TasunkaWitko

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Whoops - I should have been more clear.

I do want to add oats to the mash, but as part of the flavor profile. My reading could be wrong, but my understanding was that oats are usually added for the texture and mouthfeel characteristics.

I'm thinking that my experimental "Das Otterweizen" could benefit from just a little toasted-oat-ish flavor, but I'm not entirely sure how to go about it, or if it could be done.
 

rhys333

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Oats are generally used for texture and mouthfeel as you say, but you can toast for a subtle flavor contribution if you like. Generally 5-15 minutes at 300F in the oven laid out on a baking tray will do it. Sometimes this can give them a bitterness as well, and it helps to leave them sit 1-2 weeks in a paper bag to mellow out a bit.

You can safely add 10% by weight of the total grain bill directly to your mash and they will convert as long as you have a good base malt like domestic 2 Row to complete the starch conversion. Instead of using flaked you can use grocery store quick oats (the 1 or 3 minute kind). They are essentially the same thing you'll get at the LHBS but for a lot cheaper. Don't buy the large flake oats though or they won't convert properly without first boiling them separately.
 

catdaddy66

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I boiled a small amount of 'rolled' oats (.25#) for my cream ale yesterday. Mostly was to improve mouthfeel and head retention. Didnt know if boiling was required but figured it couldn't hurt.

No issues currently but we will see in the fibal product how this affects the beer.
 

tzaccario

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I boiled a small amount of 'rolled' oats (.25#) for my cream ale yesterday. Mostly was to improve mouthfeel and head retention. Didnt know if boiling was required but figured it couldn't hurt.

No issues currently but we will see in the fibal product how this affects the beer.
How did this turn out? I am actually waiting for my cream ale kit to arrive, and also thought about adding some oats.
 
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