Use of fruit squash for hard seltzer

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milobrews

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I have been working through some hard seltzer kits I got at half price and would like to continue making it for my partner. It’s pretty simple, to make, but I think finding flavourings we like will be the hardest part outside of kits.

In the UK we have fruit squash, which is a fruit syrup. Sugar, flavourings, sweetener and some colour. We also have cordials which are similar, elderflower is a common one. They are not the same as juice concentrate, it’s hard to explain the taste if you haven’t had one.

I’m wondering if it’s possible to use these for the flavouring. The sugar content would necessitate it being added early on and factoring this into the total sugar added.

Is it ok to add flavourings this early? Will the yeast eat or do stuff to anything other than the sugars it can eat?

If you’ve done this before please let me know, the idea of making an alcoholic sparkling version of Ribena for example sounds great, as well as a bunch of other cordials and squashes.
 

Rish

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You can do this but you need to check the label to make sure there are no preservatives that might hinder fermentation, like potassium sorbate. Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is okay. I usually wait until heavy fermentation is done (3-4 days)before adding flavo(u)rings😉 like this so the aromas aren't blown away in the CO2. There will be no residual sweetness because the yeast will eat any additional sugars so you'll need to backsweeten if you want a sweet seltzer.
 
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milobrews

milobrews

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You can do this but you need to check the label to make sure there are no preservatives that might hinder fermentation, like potassium sorbate. Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is okay. I usually wait until heavy fermentation is done (3-4 days)before adding flavo(u)rings😉 like this so the aromas aren't blown away in the CO2. There will be no residual sweetness because the yeast will eat any additional sugars so you'll need to backsweeten if you want a sweet seltzer.
Thanks Rish, great points.
 
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