Unintentional carbonation

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Brewer dad

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I have a Mead I bottled last week which I Mead with Voss kveik, with all nutrients added up front due to expected fermentation timeline. Noticed the Mead itself was bubbling for a while, which I assume is maybe excess C02 production? I did get some sulphur early on. Bottled after a month, and finished higher than expected at 1.030(from 1.105).

Opened a bottle yesterday (capped beer bottle), and had some carbonation. Very slight, and seemed to dissipate quickly. Opened two more bottles with same result. After about 5-10 minutes in the glass all carbonation seemed gone.

In trying to diagnose this, my first thought goes to infection. It really is a tasty Mead, though I understand sometimes infection may not result in off flavor. I am puzzled by how quickly carbonation dissipates though. The other thought is maybe it was just not quite finished fermenting and dropped just enough to out some temporary bubble in, though I think this unlikely.

Any other potential ideas?
 

jrgtr42

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Assuming it tastes fine, I'm going with the second thought - that it's not quite done fermenting and whatever yeast is still there is still slowly eating whatever sugars are left; of which there are still plenty.
 
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Brewer dad

Brewer dad

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Thanks! I've taken all of it and put it in the fridge as a precaution, no bottle bombs yet thankfully. Took a gravity reading of an opened bottle and no change, but doesn't take much to get some carbonation. Still tasting good!
 
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Brewer dad

Brewer dad

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I didn't, I do degas during fermentation but honestly didn't do as much of it on this one. I did notice as stated in OP some more more bubbling than usual after a week or two, figured that might be some c02.

How do you degas before bottling? Would racking to bottling bucket achieve this? Maybe I misunderstand but I'd be concerned about oxidation doing much more than typical racking.

This went probably a month from pitching to bottling
 

dwhite60

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I've found degassing is the only way I can get true still mead or wine.

They sell degassing tools. You can bend a coat hanger, stick it is a driil, then put the other end in your mead and spin it. Go slow at first or you'll have a volcano.

I have a small automotive hand-operated vacuum pump which works great. I usually make mead and wine by the gallon so it works for me.

You should be able to find some videos on Youtube.
 
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Brewer dad

Brewer dad

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Just took gravity sample on nearly identical Mead, just slightly less honey. This one I was more diligent with degassing, and used my Lee's stirrer. Also went 85 degrees instead of 80. Mead in OP went to 1.030, this one is sitting at 1.008. I believe I can reasonably assume the carbonation encountered in OP Mead was from it not being done. Wanted to update this in case someone encounters similar issue, especially with the popularity of kviek.

On a side note at sampling I prefer the first Mead. Which is surprising given I usually do not prefer things to be sweet. But with this being in the 11% range it may need to mellow out a bit.
 

dwhite60

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Same lot of honey? Sugar concentration can vary.

Same lot of yeast? Performance can vary.

Did you take a gravity reading of the latest batch before pitching?

If the first batch was indeed stuck, and you bottled it, you need to be burping those bottles regularly to relieve the pressure. Just crack the cap a bit and let some gas out, then re-crimp the cap.
 
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