types of rice? Colors and flavors?

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nathan

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I have this snippet stuck in my head of someone on a podcast talking about using some kind of asian rice in a saison that added a slight flavor they liked with it.

That little tidbit has been making me nuts. Does anyone remember it more clearly? I am sure it must be a brewing network show, and probably their "sunday session", but whether it's old or new I can't be sure.

I'm really wanting to listen to it again, as I've had this peach saison idea I want to work on when the season hits here in North Carolina later this spring/summer.

What kinds of rice have people used, and what are their effects? Where did you get them from? How did you use them?
 
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nathan

nathan

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hrm. Well maybe I'll just have to start cooking and eating a ton of rice to see what I can find.
 

Edcculus

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I've never heard of rice being used for anything other than to up fermentables and lighten body.
 

SpanishCastleAle

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Prob not much help nathan but:

I recently decided to try some other rices (for eating...I love rice) besides good ole Uncle Bens. You may have noticed that there is HUGE selection of rices at your grocery but many people in the US just use Uncle Bens (or a similar domestic long-grain rice). But there is SO much great rice out there.

Long grain is not very sticky. Short grain is very sticky (like many sushi rices...they want it sticky). Long grain has more amylose (i.e. 'straight starch') and short grain has more amylopectin (branched starch).

One of my favorites is Jasmine rice...very popular in India IIRC (EDIT: Jasmine rice is Thai). It is stickier than most long grain but not all that sticky.

How (and if) these difference translate in the final beer...sorry but I dunno. But buy some of the good stuff just for eating if nothing else...for me it was one of those; "Why did I wait so long to try this stuff!?!" moments.
 

boodyrischous

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I can tell you that a brewpub here called Barley John's has a signature beer called Wild Brunette that is a Wild Rice Brown Ale. Gives it lot's of vanilla and almond flavor. Absolutely delicious. Doesn't help for the Saison, but I thought I'd point out that Wild Rice can definitely be used in beer with great results.
 

giligson

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Wild rice is not a true rice grain - although I'm sure it would add an interesting dimension to beer.

I would also assume that most times true rice is used in beer it is only to lighten it up - once amylase has chewed on it, it will be all sugar.

Of course if your brewer had been using Jasmine rice - there is a flavouring component in that.
 

Edcculus

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Wild rice is not a true rice grain - although I'm sure it would add an interesting dimension to beer.

QUOTE]

I was just going to say that too. I'll bet wild rice varieties (really grasses) don't have much starch.
 
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nathan

nathan

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turns out it is Jasmine Rice (a type, not a brand). :)
 

snailsongs

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turns out it is Jasmine Rice (a type, not a brand). :)
Have you ever cooked up a pot of Jasmine rice? It has such a delicious floral smell.......My wife has declared any white rice to be worthless nutritionally, so I'm stuck with brown and wild, but if it were up to me, I'd probably eat Jasmine most of the time.
 

944play

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I have this snippet stuck in my head of someone on a podcast talking about using some kind of asian rice in a saison that added a slight flavor they liked with it.
Patrick from the Bruery?

Going on foggy memory.
 
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nathan

nathan

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white rice has carbohydrates, which you use as energy. If you have an active lifestyle the calories can be quite useful.

Anyway, another person said the Bruery as well, so I've downloaded it and started listening on my commute.

It's those floral characters I bet that are the goal in the final flavor. Any colored rices that impart actual color?
 

944play

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Anyway, another person said the Bruery as well, so I've downloaded it and started listening on my commute.
I listened to it yesterday. Apparently like Patrick uses flaked rice. From the sounds of the interview, that's the LEAST interesting adjunct he uses!
 
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nathan

nathan

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I'll have to try both in side-by-sides. The flaked rice with the creaminess might be an interesting switch-out for adjuncts in an american light lager style for some more body with the ultra-dry finish.
 
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