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Two Questions: BIAB Huge Trub Amt. & Mash Temp.

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cskid

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Brewed a Blvd Tank 7 Clone yesterday which generally whet terribly wrong. We'll see what the results will be. Of note this brew day was completed outside in 97F Florida heat.

Item 1: First time using my Wilser Brewing bag which I love. Great product. That said, I could not believe the incredible amount of trub that I had in the kettle post cooling. Reading a few threads appears much of this is actually fluffy proteins and above the hob trub etc. Either way there was probably close to two gallons worth of trash in the bottom of the kettle and I've not experienced in the past. After my brew day yesterday I created a copy of the recipe in beersmith entering my actual measured numbers and changing my brewhouse efficiency (an incredible 55.4%....terrible) in my equipment profile to reflect what went on. Also as I did not measure the mess in the bottom of the kettle but estimated and changed my trub loss to the fermenter from .5 gallons to 1.5 gallons (could have been more) in my equipment profile. Point was to see what beer smith would adjust. Just told me to add more water and recipe stayed the same? Does that sound accurate? Why so much trub with a fine mesh bag? Any help appreciated. For reference here is what was in the kettle:

11 lbs of pale malt
3 lbs flaked corn
12 oz biscuit malt
5 oz white wheat
Appox. 4.5 oz of Amarillo, Magnum, Simcoe hops added at various times in the boil
1 whirl floc tab

Item 2: Usually, even though it's hot constantly in Florida, I brew in my garage which is a bit cooler. Yesterday I had to brew outside. Typically in the garage I heat my mash water to the temp suggested in beer smith, add grains and hit near my target mash temp pretty regularly. I mash in with gas using a 15 gallon bayou stainless kettle wrapped in a heavy wool blanket. Yesterday I used the same process. Instructions were to heat mash water to 164.5 F and mash at 156 F for 60 mins. My mash temp never really dropped at all. Because I never have problems I did not check the mash temp until only 25 mins were left in the mash. The entire mash was between 160-162 F instead of the target 156 F for the entire 60 mins. What outcome can I expect or should I look for as a result of the high mash temp? Guess because it was blazing hot outside I should have left the wool blanket off? Thought the grains cool down the mash water some but that really did not seem to occur. Is there a setting in beer smith where I can enter the ambient air temperature that I'm brewing in? Seems to have had a big effect.

Thanks in advance for any feedback on these two items. Guess I should just expect an incredible amount of trub with BIAB moving forward?
 

cgriffith

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I'm in FL too and use a strike water temp at about 158 for mash temp of 152-154. I think it is because my grains must be at like 85-90.
 
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cskid

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I'm in FL too and use a strike water temp at about 158. I think it is because my grains must be at link 85-90.
Yeah I will certainly target something above but much closer to the target mash temp next time I'm outside and it's as hot as it was yesterday. Thanks for getting back to me.
 

Oginme

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Item 1: How long did you allow the trub to settle before transferring the wort into the fermenter? I give my wort at least a half hour after chilling to allow the protein mass on the bottom to settle and compact a bit. This provides a good clean transfer and the trub on the bottom of my kettle usually does not move much even when I tip my kettle to drain extra out. Also, the wheat malt usually brings in a higher amount of protein than most barley varieties.

Item 2: Did you take the temperature of your grains and enter them into the mash tab in BeerSmith to recalculate the strike temperature? The heat loss was probably reduced a bit with the higher ambient temperature.
 

zacster

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I always transfer my wort from the kettle to a carboy to let it settle so I can actually see it. I then siphon to the carboy and leave the trub behind. It can take a few hours though to fully settle. I use whirlfloc too, half a tab for a 5gal batch. It tends to make for fluffy settling,
 
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cskid

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Item 1: How long did you allow the trub to settle before transferring the wort into the fermenter? I give my wort at least a half hour after chilling to allow the protein mass on the bottom to settle and compact a bit. This provides a good clean transfer and the trub on the bottom of my kettle usually does not move much even when I tip my kettle to drain extra out. Also, the wheat malt usually brings in a higher amount of protein than most barley varieties.

Item 2: Did you take the temperature of your grains and enter them into the mash tab in BeerSmith to recalculate the strike temperature? The heat loss was probably reduced a bit with the higher ambient temperature.
Good questions. At the end of the cooking period I removed my immersion chiller and used my spoon to create a whirlpool. Hope was to create a cone on the bottom of the kettle. After 15-20 mins returned to see no cone but everything had settled out actually quite clear. However when I put my home made device in to measure final boil volume is when I saw how fluffy and deep the trub/fluff was on the bottom. So you think even with all of that fluff had I let things go longer it would have compacted quite a bit more?

Also, I did not measure my grain temp. How would you go about that. Stick a thermopen in the middle of the grist before soaking? Guess I could also use my laser thermometer also? Either way I’m sure it was warm. It was sitting out on the table near my kettle. So even with my canopy overhead yesterday everything was hot. Does grain temp typically stay close to the temp of the ambient air surrounding it? Never actually thought about it.
 
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cskid

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I always transfer my wort from the kettle to a carboy to let it settle so I can actually see it. I then siphon to the carboy and leave the trub behind. It can take a few hours though to fully settle. I use whirlfloc too, half a tab for a 5gal batch. It tends to make for fluffy settling,
Did use a full Whirlfloc tab. Your method sounds like it works well. My only issue is my time is limited these days with family commitments. On the few days I get to brew I feel really rushed. Not sure at this point I could take much more time than I am currently in my brew day.
 

odie

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you can either dump it all in the ferm and let it settle over the next week or 2 and then cold crash.

Or you can filter/strain the kettle into the ferm. I do this with 200 micron bucket strainers and then harvest a pure yeast cake. Everything in the fermenter makes it to the keg except about 1 pint (which is almost pure yeast cake).
 
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