Two Hearted IPA

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Clint Yeastwood

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First, I want to complain about the beer selection in my local Publix in rural Florida. When I visited today, they only had about 300 IPA's. The big problem with this scant selection is that some wise guy might manage to take advantage of the 3" of unused fridge space and put some other type of beer in there. We definitely need more IPA's and bad wheat beers with catchy names, because otherwise, someone might be corrupted by a lager or stout.

The last beer I reviewed was Funky Buddha Hop Gun, which surprised me by being excellent. This beer should have been much better. For one thing, it hadn't been sitting in my pantry for at least two years, and for another, some online beer site said it was THE best beer. Everyone else, stop brewing, because some 25-year-old beer website kid who got into microbrews in 2015 has ruled. This is THE best beer.

It may be THE best beer, but it doesn't taste that way. It's pretty good, but I won't be buying it again.

This is an all-Centennial beer. I don't know why anyone would do that after Sierra Nevada and everyone else embraced Centennial, but there it is.

The first thing that punches you in the face is a huge blast of hop smell.

I get it. Aroma is a big deal now. But this was overpowering. All I smelled was hops. And they smelled like hops. I don't want hops that smell or taste like hops and nothing else. I want citrus, pine, spices...whatever. That pure hop smell is not really that good. And I could not smell the malt at all. Nothing but hops. This stuff is the Vick's Vaporub of beer.

It was very clear, or at least it appeared so during the few seconds before the glass fogged over. The color was a pleasant light amber. The head was okay. It seemed to me that the carbonation was on the light side. That makes it go down faster, but I like a little carbonation, and who doesn't feel cheated when beer doesn't come with a belch? On the Alphabetic Belch Scale, where a perfect score is belching all the letters from A to Z, I would give this a C.

The taste is hard to describe. It's like you taste IPA at first, and then a taste like a sweetish lager sneaks in behind it. I kept drinking it, trying to find interesting flavors, but I came up with nothing. Zero complexity. I hope it's the beer, because otherwise, I have coronavirus.

I hate the thought of being seen drinking something with a name like Funky Buddha, but that beer was much, much more impressive to me. I have nothing but contempt for beer competitions, so I don't know anything about them. Maybe Two Hearted ticks off the boxes on beer judges' lists, and that makes it THE best. I don't know what those boxes are. I thought this was a perfectly good beer, but in the end, I was glad it was a 6-pack and not a 12-pack.
 
I got a slight headache after drinking this beer, so that's one more reason to buy it again. I don't ordinarily get headaches, so the beer is the most likely cause.
 
Let me be the first to disagree with you.

First off it is a west coast IPA and it's been around awhile, it's not a NEIPA so you can expect the hops to be a little more "old school" than your modern juice bomb fad, and have plenty of bitterness. I also get routinely frustrated with the overwhelming selection of IPA's in my local beverage superstore. I also routinely find myself picking up Sierra Nevada and Bells as a "go to" when I just want an unfussy but delicious and consistently good beer to drink.

Bell's Two Hearted is a phenomenal beer. It is perfectly in balanced between malt and hops for an IPA (you said so yourself that you get a "sweetish lager flavor" which would be the malt profile coming through), I get a load of grapefruit, pine resin, noble hops and all the other things you say you didn't pick up. It's an extremely flavorful beer especially given that all of the flavors come from a single hop used in a variety of different ways.

No offense but from your description, you kinda sound like you don't like IPA's.

As for your contempt of beer competitions, I'd love to try to change your mind if you're open to it. I agree that they are extremely limited in terms of deciding whether Beer A is objectively better than Beer B, but they do have their uses and they have provided valuable feedback to many brewers I know including myself. I have also found that since becoming a beer judge, my brewing has improved because I learned to look at my own beers more methodically and critically and pick up individual flavors and correctly attribute their causes. They are also just plain fun.

If beer competitions are meaningless and contemptible, then you must also believe that the sensory panels used by every major brewery in the world to evaluate their own brands to be equally as contemptible and meaningless.
 
If I don't like IPA's, why do I like IPA's?

I don't know what a juice bomb is. One of the things that materialized while I was in hibernation, I guess? Things have changed so much.

As for competitions, I was just expressing my own opinion. I don't have any interest in changing anyone's mind.

Comparing a competition to a brewery panel doesn't make any sense to me. A brewery panel serves a useful purpose, trying to help an important capitalist enterprise design products that will make a profit so people will be able to earn a living. A beer judge at an amateur competition is just helping competitive people win trophies of dubious validity, and even in real competitions for professionals, bias can't be eliminated.

It would amaze me if useful information didn't come out of competitions, and I have no doubt that they do a lot of good, but that doesn't mean they should be taken seriously when one beer is declared "better" than another.

It makes me think of Arthur Rubinstein, who was one of history's greatest pianists. You probably know who he is. He was in the same league as Horowitz and Richter. He lost a regional piano competition when he was a young man. And of course, we all know the man who won first place, because a panel of real experts said he was better than Rubinstein. Only we don't, because he was completely inferior to Rubinstein, and he died in obscurity.

Think about this: Cher and Marissa Tomei won Oscars. In 2007, a rich politician won the Nobel Peace Prize for making a documentary, and he beat a woman who was sentenced to death for saving 2500 Jews from the Nazis. A lot of trophies are worth less than the pot metal they're made of.

I went to a restaurant belonging to a Michelin-starred chef, and the meal was not a lot better than dog food. Frozen potatoes, stale scallops, a thin, lukewarm steak, and a warm martini they couldn't get right with three tries. Go to Trip Advisor, and you'll see one 5-star review after another. The stars don't mean the food was good. They mean the diners knew the chef's name.

I know a person who participates in competitions will disagree with me. I just don't respect competition results.
 
If I don't like IPA's, why do I like IPA's?

I don't know what a juice bomb is. One of the things that materialized while I was in hibernation, I guess? Things have changed so much.

As for competitions, I was just expressing my own opinion. I don't have any interest in changing anyone's mind.

Comparing a competition to a brewery panel doesn't make any sense to me. A brewery panel serves a useful purpose, trying to help an important capitalist enterprise design products that will make a profit so people will be able to earn a living. A beer judge at an amateur competition is just helping competitive people win trophies of dubious validity, and even in real competitions for professionals, bias can't be eliminated.

It would amaze me if useful information didn't come out of competitions, and I have no doubt that they do a lot of good, but that doesn't mean they should be taken seriously when one beer is declared "better" than another.

It makes me think of Arthur Rubinstein, who was one of history's greatest pianists. You probably know who he is. He was in the same league as Horowitz and Richter. He lost a regional piano competition when he was a young man. And of course, we all know the man who won first place, because a panel of real experts said he was better than Rubinstein. Only we don't, because he was completely inferior to Rubinstein, and he died in obscurity.

Think about this: Cher and Marissa Tomei won Oscars. In 2007, a rich politician won the Nobel Peace Prize for making a documentary, and he beat a woman who was sentenced to death for saving 2500 Jews from the Nazis. A lot of trophies are worth less than the pot metal they're made of.

I went to a restaurant belonging to a Michelin-starred chef, and the meal was not a lot better than dog food. Frozen potatoes, stale scallops, a thin, lukewarm steak, and a warm martini they couldn't get right with three tries. Go to Trip Advisor, and you'll see one 5-star review after another. The stars don't mean the food was good. They mean the diners knew the chef's name.

I know a person who participates in competitions will disagree with me. I just don't respect competition results.

A juice bomb is a common term for the modern interpretation of IPA - low bitterness, tropical fruit, floral, citrus, sometimes even sweet. Usually they are served in obnoxiously psychedelic cans that all look the same after awhile of browsing through aisle after aisle of "hazy juicy DIPA with mango and passionfuit". Bells Two Hearted, and Sierra Nevada Celebration Ale, and Pliny the Elder are examples of what a classic west coast IPA SHOULD taste like.

A brewery panel and a competition judge are using the exact same methods to evaluate beer. BJCP competitions also evaluate professional beer (I've judged several pro competitions myself), and Bell's two hearted was evaluated as the best beer by a panel of BJCP judges working for the American Homebrewer's Association using the same evaluation standards as amateur competitions. The line between amateur and professional in brewing can get pretty blurry sometimes, and I've even seen a number of amateurs use a string of competition wins to springboard "going pro".

If a person wins one gold, it's of dubious validity. If a person wins 20 golds, they are usually doing something right. there are certainly those brewers who play the numbers game and enter 100+ beers per year in competitions to chase medals, and that's not my thing either.

The amateur competitions are really no different from a professional evaluation, the same judges, methods, and (often) the same sensory training is used for the evaluators. A professional sensory panel just says "yes this is off brand, or yes this is on brand" where a competition judge says "this is to style or not to style".

They also have a real world effect on capitalist enterprises by improving the ability to market a beer as award winning or say "the best beer in America".

I'd also like to point out that there's a difference between not believing competitions are valid vs. believing anyone who has won a competition is overhyped. Some people win because they are genuinely good at what they do. If a person walks into a Michelin star restaurant expecting the food to be overrated, they'll find bad food. People's perception is heavily influenced by their underlying beliefs.
 
I should also add that one more huge difference between an in-house panel and a panel of competition judges is that the in-house panel chooses beers that will be sent out to the final judges, the public, later. A huge unseen panel of beer drinkers can then post reviews all over the web, and the opinions of more than a few people from a small community with its own cliques and orthodoxy can add input. Competition judges hand down their decisions and medals, and that's that. Then someone who listens to them says Two Hearted IPA is THE best beer, without realizing how crazy and wrong that is. Like anyone who disagrees should be canceled.

Saying any beer is "the best beer" is facially ridiculous. It's like saying Gaugin is the best artist or blue is the best color. Any high school graduate ought to know better. It's amazing that an adult wrote it without realizing what it said about his understanding of the world. There is no best beer. There are good beers, and there are beers almost everyone can agree are bad, but there is no best beer.

Anyway, sorry you didn't like my review, but there was nothing wrong with it. A review is an opinion, and people have differing opinions about beers. The site's rules don't say reviews have to come from beer judges or that I can only say things other people agree with. I will keep reviewing things honestly without any thought as to who agrees, and when other people post reviews I disagree with, I will never be offended.

I thought this was a good beer, but for the reasons I provided, I won't be drinking it any more.
 
I should also add that one more huge difference between an in-house panel and a panel of competition judges is that the in-house panel chooses beers that will be sent out to the final judges, the public, later. A huge unseen panel of beer drinkers can then post reviews all over the web, and the opinions of more than a few people from a small community with its own cliques and orthodoxy can add input. Competition judges hand down their decisions and medals, and that's that. Then someone who listens to them says Two Hearted IPA is THE best beer, without realizing how crazy and wrong that is. Like anyone who disagrees should be canceled.

Saying any beer is "the best beer" is facially ridiculous. It's like saying Gaugin is the best artist or blue is the best color. Any high school graduate ought to know better. It's amazing that an adult wrote it without realizing what it said about his understanding of the world. There is no best beer. There are good beers, and there are beers almost everyone can agree are bad, but there is no best beer.

Anyway, sorry you didn't like my review, but there was nothing wrong with it. A review is an opinion, and people have differing opinions about beers. The site's rules don't say reviews have to come from beer judges or that I can only say things other people agree with. I will keep reviewing things honestly without any thought as to who agrees, and when other people post reviews I disagree with, I will never be offended.

I thought this was a good beer, but for the reasons I provided, I won't be drinking it any more.
#triggered?

I never said anything about cancelling you, or that your opinion was invalid, or that I even agreed that Bell's is the best beer. I was offering an opposing opinion that Bells is a very good beer and explained my reasons, which are just as valid as yours. I also was attempting to maybe offer up a different take on competitions which you may not have considered, and this blind hog meant no offense, and it was not an attack on your personal beliefs.

Companies make grandiose claims about products all the time.. #1 doctor recommended... worlds best cheesesteak... Worlds best cheeseburger... America's most reliable network. It's just noise and just one opinion, just like yours.

I highly doubt that anyone believes (including Zymurgy or Bells) that Two Hearted is objectively the best beer in America, that would be silly. So the person you're railing against probably doesn't exist, it's just a fun thing to do... proclaim something the best in the world.


It's still a very good beer
I still enjoy competitions

😁
 
First, I want to complain about the beer selection in my local Publix in rural Florida. When I visited today, they only had about 300 IPA's. The big problem with this scant selection is that some wise guy might manage to take advantage of the 3" of unused fridge space and put some other type of beer in there. We definitely need more IPA's and bad wheat beers with catchy names, because otherwise, someone might be corrupted by a lager or stout.

The last beer I reviewed was Funky Buddha Hop Gun, which surprised me by being excellent. This beer should have been much better. For one thing, it hadn't been sitting in my pantry for at least two years, and for another, some online beer site said it was THE best beer. Everyone else, stop brewing, because some 25-year-old beer website kid who got into microbrews in 2015 has ruled. This is THE best beer.

It may be THE best beer, but it doesn't taste that way. It's pretty good, but I won't be buying it again.

This is an all-Centennial beer. I don't know why anyone would do that after Sierra Nevada and everyone else embraced Centennial, but there it is.

The first thing that punches you in the face is a huge blast of hop smell.

I get it. Aroma is a big deal now. But this was overpowering. All I smelled was hops. And they smelled like hops. I don't want hops that smell or taste like hops and nothing else. I want citrus, pine, spices...whatever. That pure hop smell is not really that good. And I could not smell the malt at all. Nothing but hops. This stuff is the Vick's Vaporub of beer.

It was very clear, or at least it appeared so during the few seconds before the glass fogged over. The color was a pleasant light amber. The head was okay. It seemed to me that the carbonation was on the light side. That makes it go down faster, but I like a little carbonation, and who doesn't feel cheated when beer doesn't come with a belch? On the Alphabetic Belch Scale, where a perfect score is belching all the letters from A to Z, I would give this a C.

The taste is hard to describe. It's like you taste IPA at first, and then a taste like a sweetish lager sneaks in behind it. I kept drinking it, trying to find interesting flavors, but I came up with nothing. Zero complexity. I hope it's the beer, because otherwise, I have coronavirus.

I hate the thought of being seen drinking something with a name like Funky Buddha, but that beer was much, much more impressive to me. I have nothing but contempt for beer competitions, so I don't know anything about them. Maybe Two Hearted ticks off the boxes on beer judges' lists, and that makes it THE best. I don't know what those boxes are. I thought this was a perfectly good beer, but in the end, I was glad it was a 6-pack and not a 12-pack.
The overlapping layers of sarcasm and double speak have me confused. Buddha’s hop gun was not good but when compared to Two Hearted it was? Or the other way around? Or neither were good? Or were they both good?
 
I like the 2 hearted ale and have had fun trying to get close with the clone recipes. I am currently fermenting one with the Cascade hops as a substitute for Centennial. Yes, pretty basic stuff but hoping to isolate the contribution for a bit of compare and contrast. Having fun and brewing a drinkable product is the name of the game. Overall, I agree that "best" is relative. Budweizer or Miller lite could be considered "best" if evaluated based on commercial longevity or their annual sales.
 
The overlapping layers of sarcasm and double speak have me confused. Buddha’s hop gun was not good but when compared to Two Hearted it was? Or the other way around? Or neither were good? Or were they both good?
I had to read the post 3 times to finally make sense of it. After that it was slightly funny, but wrong.
 
I just want to second the praise for Bell's Two Hearted ale. It really is exceptionally well-balanced, to my tastes anyway. (Also, might be my wife's favorite beer so I guess I'll have to try a clone one of these days.)

And that's the point, isn't it? Tastes vary. What anyone likes best is subjective, by definition. Hell, there are people who like their steaks well done.

Chasing some platonic ideal of what is objectively best is kinda silly, but that doesn't mean that competitions or judging standards are silly.
 
Centennial is one of my favorite hops for single hopped beers. I have a super simple centennial DIPA on tap right now with 10lbs of pale malt and 5lbs of crystal and constantly hopped through the boil. TIL that Two Hearted is also one of these beers, which makes sense since it has been a beer I have bought many, many times over the years.
 
Centennial is one of my favorite hops for single hopped beers. I have a super simple centennial DIPA on tap right now with 10lbs of pale malt and 5lbs of crystal and constantly hopped through the boil. TIL that Two Hearted is also one of these beers, which makes sense since it has been a beer I have bought many, many times over the years.

5lbs of crystal malt???

oofah
 
66% base malt and 33% crystal?

With 5 oz crystal, it's 97% base malt and 3% crystal.



Can you describe the process in more detail? Thanks!
5 pounds

I don't have the recipe in front of me, but it's basically the hop schedule of the 60 minute IPA. 20-25ish grams added at 60, 50, 40... down to 0 - then there's a big dry hop addition that I choose to put in during the whirlpool because I don't like how much it impacts my clarity. I know crystal (especially in these quantities) is shunned around these parts, but it's a really good beer. I made it in one gallon batches a few times before going to a full five gallons and kegging it.
 
I'm a fan of Two Hearted when I'm away from home and want a good IPA. I have brewed a couple of clone recipes in the past and they have been OK not great.

a couple of months ago I discovered that Bell's has an online Homebrew store and they sell all-grain brew kits of their beers. I picked up both a Two Hearted and Official Hazy kit. both are now in my kegerator and they are great.

I just checked their store and the Official kit is out of stock but the Two Hearted kits are available. The Two Hearted kits are $30, not including yeast (great price for 6 oz centennial and over 13# of grain). to check shipping costs, I put one in my cart and it was $20+ for shipping, but for 2 or 3 (maybe more, who knows) shipping is $5. I also noticed that when I put one in my cart the price went down to $25.50, and the note said "House Yeast" which is ambiguous because the ingredient list clearly said yeast not included.

(I have no affiliation with Bell's.)
 
a couple of months ago I discovered that Bell's has an online Homebrew store and they sell all-grain brew kits of their beers. I picked up both a Two Hearted and Official Hazy kit. both are now in my kegerator and they are great.
It's good to see they are still offering kits after the change in ownership.

A couple of years ago, they also offered a number of varieties of "Select Hops" separately from the kits. If those items return over time, I will buy hops from them again - as I found the hops to be better than what I was getting from other online stores.

Imperial Yeast A62 Bell's House Yeast vs "How to Culture Bells House Yeast From A Bottle Or Can (currently in Internet Archives")?
 
Two Hearted is one of the clones I always have on tap, one of these days I will get their kit. Used to also make Hopslam but didn't like it nearly as much.
 
What L for the crystal? and what SRM are you getting for the DIPA?

With a crystal 20, it appears that SRM is the 15+ range - which feels like it's too dark for a DIPA.
Crystal 20. It’s definitely on the darker side, but nothing I haven’t seen in some commercial brews. It’s more of a red ipa, bordering in a clear purple. I don’t get too hung up on labels, the recipe calls it a DIPA, I just call it good, lol
 
What L for the crystal? and what SRM are you getting for the DIPA?

With a crystal 20, it appears that SRM is the 15+ range - which feels like it's too dark for a DIPA.
 

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Anyone notice it's called two hearted IPA now and not ale? Is that new from the acquisition?
 
I just call it good
+1.

33% crystal 20 in 2023. When almost everyone else is thinking 0% crystal. 🤔

There's a clone recipe for Pete's Wicked Ale over in AHA forums. It's roughly brewers malt + 20% crystal 60 + 3% chocolate (ABV around 5.5%). When I brewed it, I enjoyed the result. Point? I often enjoy a "sweeter" beer.

I had an open afternoon, so I brewed something similar to your DIPA. If it comes out good, +1 to your. If it's #epicfailure, -1 to me. :mug:
 
My new beer glasses arrived today, so I decided to give this beer another shot. I wanted to make sure I didn't get it wrong the first time.

The head looked great. For some reason, the hop aroma face punch I didn't like last time was not there, though. There was less empty space in the top of the glass this time, so maybe it didn't push the aroma to my nose like last time.

When I drank it, it seemed sweet and watery. It made me think of Budmilcoors. I'm not making that up. Beers like Bud have a soapy, slightly sweet taste with nothing to balance it, and it makes me gag a little. This beer, bad as it was, was much, much better, but it did remind me of the cheap stuff.

I'm wondering if this six-pack sat in a hot truck too long. Something is going on. The first one was nice, but I poured most of this one out. I thought, "I want to be fair, but life is short, and I'm not going to ruin my only beer experience of the night to make some forum people happy."

Now I'm having my last Rasputin Imperial Stout. I honestly think this may be the best beer I've ever had, and I never thought I'd say that about a store beer. Drinking it has actually changed the way I see beer. It has given me ideas about my own beers. After I drink one, I sit and relive it for half an hour.

I don't have a proper imperial stout glass, but I really like this beer in a pint Ball jar. It makes sense. Inside, a Ball jar has a somewhat similar shape.

Flame away! I know you want to. I don't take it personally. I love you anyway.
 
First of all, don't go lumping Miller High Life in with Bud and Coors. They don't call it the champagne of beers for nothing.:)

Ad sorry, but if Bell's really reminds you of Budweiser there's something wrong with your taste buds. It's fine to not like it, but the only thing it has in common with the cheap stuff is bubbles. I suppose it is possible that you got a bad six pack, and the fact that you found the two bottles quite different might support that. But I wouldn't expect it to taste like Bud unless you're comparing it to a Bud that also sat in a hot truck too long.
 
The big problem with blaming my taste buds is that they work so well for everything else. It's basically an ad hominem fallacy, criticizing the man instead of what he says. I tasted what I tasted.

I'm an amazing cook. Guests stare at me in wonder when they taste my cheesecake and pizza. I have very good taste in Scotch. I was drinking 16-year-old Lagavulin years before Ron Swanson existed. Back when I smoked cigars, I had great taste in those. I had humidors full of aged Cohibas, Trinidads, CAO Brazilias (Gols are much better than Gordos) , Bauza pyramids, Romeo y Julieta Churchills, Partagas Lusis, and so on. I'm very particular about brandy. I don't really like anything below the quality of an XO, and some XO's don't make the cut. I love other highly-regarded beers. I hate cheap beers from places like America, Australia, and Mexico. If you gave me a pallet of Foster's or Tecate, I would give it away or use it for beer butt chicken.

There was a watery undercurrent in the Bell's I just poured out. No mistaking it. The first one was a lot better, but it had it, too. The malt was low in flavor.

The Rasputin I just drank was magnificent. I felt like I could not leave the chair. I moved the glass from one nostril to the other to enjoy the sensation as the aroma followed the movement of the glass. I enjoyed the way the flavors changed and became more complex as the glass warmed up.

Let's see. Beer Advocate gives Rasputin a 95% rating. So my taste buds worked at least once.

It's not a good idea to tell people they can't taste anything unless you know something about them. If I had come here and praised Michelob or Kronenbourg, you would have a point, but that's not me. I didn't start homebrewing all those years ago because I had no taste in beer. You don't know anything about me except that I found something wrong with a beer you like.

Surely you don't think everyone who finds fault with products you like is wrong.
 
Sorry you took it that way. IMO, it's quite possible for there to be exactly one thing wrong with someone's taste buds, and for this to be your one thing.

As an immunologist by training, I'd call it a hole in your repertoire. Google it for funsies if you like.
 
RE the date, I was wondering about that.

The date is about seven weeks ago. I don't know if that's the packaging date or the best-by date. This is Florida, and we have had hot days since then. Even when it's not that hot, the sun can beat down on vehicles and heat them up inside.

Maybe it sat near something hot in the store.

I think this beer would look a lot better if I hadn't been drinking Rasputin for the last three days. I would have finished it if the Rasputin hadn't been here, making it look like dishwater. I don't drink a lot, and I knew how much better the evening would be if my only beverage was a Rasputin.

I'm done trying new IPA's for now. I feel reasonably caught up, and I am satisfied with my own IPA-ish recipes as they are. I will try a different type of beer next. I am trying to gain knowledge after a long layoff, so continuing to buy IPA's is not the right move at this time.

Maybe I can find some barleywines.
 
Out of curiosity, why would a store bought beer never be the best beer you’ve ever had?
I brew beer to suit my own tastes and no one else's. To me, that's the whole point of brewing. To get what I want. If some corporation makes a certain type of beer perfectly well, and I'm not determined to have beer that's exactly what I want, I think I should go to the store and buy their beer instead of spending money and working hard to make something identical or not as good. I don't see any point in struggling to make Warsteiner or Murphy's if I can buy them.

Back when I quit brewing, I was making things I liked better than anything I could find in stores. That was my goal, and it worked. You probably know how that is. It's the same way with food. When you get a recipe exactly the way you like it, you may never be satisfied with the same dish in a restaurant. I've paid for a lot of good pizza, but for my tastes, none of it comes close to what I make for myself. If I buy pizza, it means I don't feel like cooking and I'm willing to compromise.

I tried a lot of beers after that, but I can't say I liked any of them as much as what I had made. It discouraged me from drinking beer. I still drank beer, but I drank a lot less.

When I wrote, "best beer I've ever had," I wasn't trying to be perfectly correct. I meant Rasputin may be the beer I LIKE the most. I'm sure that over the years, there have been times when I've said my beers were better than anything I had bought, but if I did, I didn't really mean they were objectively better than every other beer. That wouldn't make any sense. I meant I liked them better.
 
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