Two Brew Days, One Fermenter

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Dregsy

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About to do my first BIAB brew day. I bought a 5 gallon kit and am planning on splitting it into two 2.5 gallon brew days as my kettle only has 5 gallon capacity. Originally, I was planning on just putting them in two separate fermenters and just combining them in the bottling bucket when fermentation is done as they are the exact same recipe. However, I started thinking what if I just brew the first one normally, let it cool overnight in the fermenter without pitching the yeast, then do the second brew day, cool it down with a wort chiller, transfer to the fermenter with the previous days wort, then pitch the yeast.

Are there any reasons not to do this beyond the risks of cooling wort overnight? Is there a better way to go about this?

Any insight is much appreciated
 

Velnerj

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I've never done this so perhaps someone else with actual experience can correct me. But it seems like a plan that could work. Throw the first wort in the fermenter hot (unless your fermenter is glass, the absolutely don't do that!), seal it up with an airlock and store someplace cool and dark.
The second wort chill add to the fermenter, pitch yeast when you've homogenized both worts at a good pitching temp.
 
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Dregsy

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I've never done this so perhaps someone else with actual experience can correct me. But it seems like a plan that could work. Throw the first wort in the fermenter hot (unless your fermenter is glass, the absolutely don't do that!), seal it up with an airlock and store someplace cool and dark.
The second wort chill add to the fermenter, pitch yeast when you've homogenized both worts at a good pitching temp.
Good thing you mentioned the glass part as I would have absolutely done that. bucket fermenter it is.
 

Jimmy_ute

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If it is a plastic bucket, you really shouldn't be putting hot wort in it either. Take a look at the no-chill method to get some ideas. Hoppy beers can turn out significantly different with no chill. I've done some non hoppy beers in corny kegs this way.
 
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Dregsy

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If it is a plastic bucket, you really shouldn't be putting hot wort in it either. Take a look at the no-chill method to get some ideas. Hoppy beers can turn out significantly different with no chill. I've done some non hoppy beers in corny kegs this way.
hmmm maybe I should just use my wort chiller on the first batch too, at least to bring the temp below 90 F or so before adding to the fermenter
 

NSMikeD

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I split 5 gal kits all the time. I brew 2.5gal batches. If this is your first BIAB, experience is priceless. Consider doing two brews fully separate.
I vacuum seal and refrigerate the second half and then brew that half after I keg (bottle in your case) the first one and free up the fermenter.

Odds are you’ll want to do a few things slightly differently the second time around.
 

hottpeper13

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Why not just leave it in the BK overnite,then transfer in morning and mash in BIAB ,pull, squeeze and boil the second one.
 

odie

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just pitch the yeast as soon as the first batch is cooled. Add the second batch to the active fermentation once it's cooled.
 

Miraculix

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just pitch the yeast as soon as the first batch is cooled. Add the second batch to the active fermentation once it's cooled.
I wanted to suggest exactly that. You don't have to wait till you got all the wort together. There are even benefits in pitching the yeast in the smaller part first and then add the rest the next day. Just don't wait too long.
 
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Dregsy

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I wanted to suggest exactly that. You don't have to wait till you got all the wort together. There are even benefits in pitching the yeast in the smaller part first and then add the rest the next day. Just don't wait too long.
Interesting, I'll definitely do that when I try this again. I guess I was just worried about messing with something once it already has yeast in it but I don't have any real reason for why it would mess with anything.
I ended up just pitching them once when they were combined and things seem to be going well. Airlock is bubbling away with a good looking head of krausen on it, and I have no reason to think it got infected or anything. Of course won't know for sure for a couple weeks.
 

RM-MN

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Interesting, I'll definitely do that when I try this again. I guess I was just worried about messing with something once it already has yeast in it but I don't have any real reason for why it would mess with anything.
I ended up just pitching them once when they were combined and things seem to be going well. Airlock is bubbling away with a good looking head of krausen on it, and I have no reason to think it got infected or anything. Of course won't know for sure for a couple weeks.
Of course it go infected, you just can't keep all the bacteria at bay. The first one probably got inoculated by a few million bacteria which then doubled every 90 minutes or so. Then you dumped in a couple hundred BILLION yeast cells which quickly created conditions that stopped the bacteria from propagating any more. Nothing to worry about.
 

zacster

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I've left my 5gal batch to settle overnight in a closed carboy before transferring to smaller carboys (that fit in fridge) and adding the yeast many times. Never had a problem and always get good clear beer.
 
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