trying to minimize o2 in a bucket

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Nickles66

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i'm stil using the buckets from a starter kit. i was wondering if i could use wine preserver to remove o2. i have read that when brewing in buckets, you increase the risk of tainting your wort when taking measurements. at the restaurant, i noticed the servers using a can of wine preserver (carbon dioxide, argon, nitrogen) to help extend the life of our wine. would this help reduce the risk?
 

Revvy

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What you read is a little of the typical fear mongering by the glass carboy industry. The whole oxygen permeability of plastic things is a lot more overblown than the actuality. The actual numbers are realy negligible Folks, myself included have left beer in buckets for 6 months to a year with no noticeable issues.

Honestly it's nothing most of us really worry about.
 

TopherM

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Unless you are storing long term, like 8-12 months in a bucket, oxidation really isn't an issue. The plastic is ever so slightly permiable, but the fermentation keeps a blanket of CO2 above the beer and always below any oxygen, because CO2 is heavier than air. As long as you keep the top closed and don't open it over and over, there is a negligable chance of oxidation.

Adding the wine perserver would present a higher risk of oxidation than just leaving it be!

Just always do a 2-3 week primary for average to low gravity beers (anything under 1.07 or so), and 99% of the time fermentation will be complete without you having yto open the bucket at all to take a reading, THEN take your FG reading, instead of trying to rush it and time it to pull out of the primary exactly when it hits FG. The extra time in the bucket will not only get you to FG, the yeast will also clean up off flavors AND the beer will start bulk conditioning.

Don't overthink it or try to rush it. Patience is a key ingredient in good beer.
 

jphebbie2

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The o2 in the bucket from the initial seal after pitching your yeast isn't a problem. It will be blown out by the co2 produced during fermentation. O2 is a good thing to add to your beer ON BREWDAY. It helps yeast strengthen cell walls and reproduce healthy cells. As long as you keep your bucket sealed until racking day ( no peeking!) it shouldn't be a problem. You risk oxidation after about a month in a "sealed" plastic bucket. It's a very slow exposure
 

cooper

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I agree, I'd carry on with business as usual until you noticed something really off and that is the ONLY thing you can narrow it down to. The thing I like about buckets it you get more surface area exposure for a beer where the ester and yeastie charactaristics are important, such as a hefe. And those are only in the primary for 10 days and then I'm bottling.
 
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