trub in keg

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keke

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Hi guys, I brewed my first NEIPA two weeks ago and kegged yesterday.
When I was transferring the beer I accidentally sucked up a nice amount of trub and hop particles (I'm guessing around a cup) and obviously when I poured me a glass it had a lot of hop particles and probably a nice amount of yeast. It has enough hop particles for it to be much less pleasant than it could have been. I am wondering how to go about fixing it.
Should I just let it be for a few days under cold temp so everything will drop down and then toss the first pour or should I keep taking out small amounts and shaking the keg about once a day in order to really make sure all the trub is out of there? Because if you notice the bottom part of the keg, there is a small circle area which is lower than the rest of the keg and I was thinking that trub will also surround that area and maybe some of the trub will come out in every pour instead of all of it coming out at once. That will make the beer lose much of its thing. I mean I know NEIPAs are supposed to be hazy, and trust me, it's VERY hazy, but I don't want to actually have hop particles in my glass.
Any suggestions? I would highly appreciate it ! :)
 

springinloose1

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Just leave it be for a week while it's carbonating up, all that gunk will collect and compact on the bottom. But if it's really "that" bad, then siphon transfer, otherwise the beer will clear up and you'll be pouring not-so-hazy NEIPA in no time.
 
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keke

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Just leave it be for a week while it's carbonating up, all that gunk will collect and compact on the bottom. But if it's really "that" bad, then siphon transfer, otherwise the beer will clear up and you'll be pouring not-so-hazy NEIPA in no time.
I sure do hope so. Do you think I should not touch it at all during that week?
 

homebrewer_99

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You have a couple of choices to make NOW that will impact your future decision.

If the keg has to be moved next week then you're going to rouse up some of the dregs on the bottom. This is what you want to avoid.

If you're going to be serving from a kegerator or keezer then you should set it up (connect lines) there NOW then let it to clear there. The first couple pours will suck up much of the dregs.

You can avoid the dregs several ways...the quickest and least costly is to shorten your "beer out" tube so it doesn't reach the bottom of the keg. This can be done by inserting about 6 inches of it into the keg and giving a slight tug to bend slightly, inserting another 2 inches and repeating 1 or 2 times more. Other people have cut their tubes. I think bending is a easier (and better) idea.

If you have to move it then you should probably think about using a clarifier (gelatin or Polyclar (Divergan F) and waiting a day or two before racking it to another keg.

All of this can be eliminated if you remember to cold crash BEFORE kegging. The clearer the beer going into the keg the clearer the beer in the glass.
 
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keke

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You have a couple of choices to make NOW that will impact your future decision.

If the keg has to be moved next week then you're going to rouse up some of the dregs on the bottom. This is what you want to avoid.

If you're going to be serving from a kegerator or keezer then you should set it up (connect lines) there NOW then let it to clear there. The first couple pours will suck up much of the dregs.

You can avoid the dregs several ways...the quickest and least costly is to shorten your "beer out" tube so it doesn't reach the bottom of the keg. This can be done by inserting about 6 inches of it into the keg and giving a slight tug to bend slightly, inserting another 2 inches and repeating 1 or 2 times more. Other people have cut their tubes. I think bending is a easier (and better) idea.

If you have to move it then you should probably think about using a clarifier (gelatin or Polyclar (Divergan F) and waiting a day or two before racking it to another keg.

All of this can be eliminated if you remember to cold crash BEFORE kegging. The clearer the beer going into the keg the clearer the beer in the glass.
I actually did cold crash it for like 3 days. But because I'm a genius I put the hose to low and it got to the trub on the bottom. I don't have another keg to transfer to so I don't think I will shorten the dip tube. I think I'll just wait a while and hopefully most of the trub will come out the first glass or two, I mean what else can I do really?
 

homebrewer_99

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I actually did cold crash it for like 3 days. But because I'm a genius I put the hose to low and it got to the trub on the bottom. I don't have another keg to transfer to so I don't think I will shorten the dip tube. I think I'll just wait a while and hopefully most of the trub will come out the first glass or two, I mean what else can I do really?
Gelatin, Polyclar, and cold crashing all work. They just work at different lengths of time.

Which one you decide to use really depends on your schedule. :)
 
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