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grumpyn55

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Is there any advantage to a triclad pot ( mega pot) verses a single layer pot ( stout blicmen) for boiling wort thanks in advance
 
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On paper, yes. Practically, not really.

Now we offer single layer kettles BUT we used to sell the same exact kettles the MegaPots are made from so I'll try and give an unbiased answer...

The tri-ply kettles can be marketed very easily as a 'no scorching kettle'. But in real life the tri-ply kettles are designed for making thick soups and sauces in restaurants; not making beer. The sauces and soups have a much higher tendency to scorch than beer.

Out of all the kettles we've sold I have NEVER had even one person mention anything about scorching with their kettle. Companies like Blichmann and Stout would also not be around if all single layer kettles did was scorch the wort.

The three main reasons we ditched the tri-ply kettles and moved exclusively to the single layers were:
1. Add cost with no real added benefit
2. Added weight
3. MegaPots are wider than tall
 
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grumpyn55

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Thanks for the info. Am looking to upgrade to 10 gal. Pot so am try ing to get as much info am leaning toward s eather one of yours or a stout
Thanks again
 
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I have a similar question to the OP, but more around durability and size-to-performance considerations. I'm looking for a setup that could take heavy use (potentially in a Brew-on-premise application), without the pain of dealing with the internal surfaces on keggles.

Also, what's the driver (other than space) on a taller kettle vs. a wider kettle (both for mash and for boil)? I'm more concerned with heating speed and utility efficiency than use of space. I'd think a shallower, wider kettle with an aluminum plated bottom would heat faster, and would work better for a whirlpool. A taller kettle might be better for a mash tun, since the false bottom would be smaller and the grain bed would make for a better filter. Since I'm looking at HERMS for the mash tun I'm not worried about direct fire efficiency.
 

Golddiggie

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I have a similar question to the OP, but more around durability and size-to-performance considerations. I'm looking for a setup that could take heavy use (potentially in a Brew-on-premise application), without the pain of dealing with the internal surfaces on keggles.

Also, what's the driver (other than space) on a taller kettle vs. a wider kettle (both for mash and for boil)? I'm more concerned with heating speed and utility efficiency than use of space. I'd think a shallower, wider kettle with an aluminum plated bottom would heat faster, and would work better for a whirlpool. A taller kettle might be better for a mash tun, since the false bottom would be smaller and the grain bed would make for a better filter. Since I'm looking at HERMS for the mash tun I'm not worried about direct fire efficiency.
Care to explain what you're talking about here?? I've yet to have any 'pain of dealing with the internal surface on keggles'...

BTW, keggles are typically 1.3mm thick 304 stainless steel. I've had no issues with using them in my brewing setup. I have a keggle mash tun, keggle BK and I'm making a short pony keggle HLT to use this weekend. LOVE the built-in handles that cannot be broken. Only things that stick out from them are the fittings as you install (or have installed).

Don't be too fast to dismiss keggles.
 
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I have a similar question to the OP, but more around durability and size-to-performance considerations. I'm looking for a setup that could take heavy use (potentially in a Brew-on-premise application), without the pain of dealing with the internal surfaces on keggles.

Also, what's the driver (other than space) on a taller kettle vs. a wider kettle (both for mash and for boil)? I'm more concerned with heating speed and utility efficiency than use of space. I'd think a shallower, wider kettle with an aluminum plated bottom would heat faster, and would work better for a whirlpool. A taller kettle might be better for a mash tun, since the false bottom would be smaller and the grain bed would make for a better filter. Since I'm looking at HERMS for the mash tun I'm not worried about direct fire efficiency.
Durability wise anything stainless will work just fine.

The tri-clad bottom kettles actually heat slower than single layer kettles. We've also done heating tests with our kettles vs keggles. Keggles take longer because of the thicker materials.
 

Golddiggie

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Durability wise anything stainless will work just fine.

The tri-clad bottom kettles actually heat slower than single layer kettles. We've also done heating tests with our kettles vs keggles. Keggles take longer because of the thicker materials.
IME, with the right burner, used the right way, the time difference you're talking about is negligible. I've been able to get more wort to a boil in my keggle than another brewer in an aluminum kettle. Two different make/model burners were used which helps to indicate how it's more burner dependent than kettle/keggle.

BTW, I don't even mind if it takes a few more minutes (if that) to heat up in my keggle compared with a thinner walled kettle. Durability of keggles is almost legendary. Thin wall kettles, not so much. :eek: As a test, kick both as hard as you can and see which one is deformed.
 
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IME, with the right burner, used the right way, the time difference you're talking about is negligible. I've been able to get more wort to a boil in my keggle than another brewer in an aluminum kettle. Two different make/model burners were used which helps to indicate how it's more burner dependent than kettle/keggle.

BTW, I don't even mind if it takes a few more minutes (if that) to heat up in my keggle compared with a thinner walled kettle. Durability of keggles is almost legendary. Thin wall kettles, not so much. :eek: As a test, kick both as hard as you can and see which one is deformed.
You are a huge advocate of keggles, which is fine but I'm trying to answer the OPs question. It's a fact that a single wall kettle will heat up faster than a keggle or multi layered kettle with all other factors the same. We've done extensive testing and would be happy to send along the raw data.

As for kicking your kettle... I don't advise anyone to kick a few hundred dollar item they purchased. If I have time tomorrow I will shoot a video though. I've personally done much worse than kicking one (dropped from the top of a pallet 10ft high) with no damage. Stainless is some tough stuff!
 

Golddiggie

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The typical thin wall stainless you find in many kettles/pots is not as sturdy as what you find in keg construction. Even a Blichmann kettle isn't as strong.

I'm a fan/advocate of keggles due to being able to customize them 100%. Not something you can do with pretty much all other kettles I've seen. You're always locked into some configurations that you might not want.

I have my oxy acetylene torch where I live once again. So, there's tons more I can do to customize my keggles (current and future). I also have the ability to bend my own 1/2" OD stainless dip tubes. I know most brewers don't go this far into making their hardware (most just buy their stuff or do minor fabrication). I'm more of a fan of doing things that I can.

I still want to know what was meant by the original comment I posted about... "without the pain of dealing with the internal surfaces on keggles." IME, there's no difference between keggles and kettles... With the exception, maybe, that kettles [inside] are more shiny... IMO, NBD. I've shined up keggles really nice without too much effort. So the outside of a keggle can be just as finished/polished as any kettle out there.
 

day_trippr

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I still want to know what was meant by the original comment I posted about... "without the pain of dealing with the internal surfaces on keggles."
I'll go out on a limb and point out the "return" at the top of the typical keggle wall that has no counterpart on a kettle. It can cause some issues, albeit minor for the most part...

Cheers!
 

Golddiggie

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I'll go out on a limb and point out the "return" at the top of the typical keggle wall that has no counterpart on a kettle. It can cause some issues, albeit minor for the most part...

Cheers!
If that's the case, then [IMO] he's a p***y... :eek: It doesn't take much effort to trim that down to a very small amount. I did it in my BK, but left more on the MLT so that there was less heat loss and such. Can still get the mash paddle in there really well (into the MLT). There are some that have gone further to remove material from the opening. I chose to not do that with my current BK since I want to be able to easily stack it.
 

Markd27

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The typical thin wall stainless you find in many kettles/pots is not as sturdy as what you find in keg construction. Even a Blichmann kettle isn't as strong.

I'm a fan/advocate of keggles due to being able to customize them 100%. Not something you can do with pretty much all other kettles I've seen. You're always locked into some configurations that you might not want.

I have my oxy acetylene torch where I live once again. So, there's tons more I can do to customize my keggles (current and future). I also have the ability to bend my own 1/2" OD stainless dip tubes. I know most brewers don't go this far into making their hardware (most just buy their stuff or do minor fabrication). I'm more of a fan of doing things that I can.

I still want to know what was meant by the original comment I posted about... "without the pain of dealing with the internal surfaces on keggles." IME, there's no difference between keggles and kettles... With the exception, maybe, that kettles [inside] are more shiny... IMO, NBD. I've shined up keggles really nice without too much effort. So the outside of a keggle can be just as finished/polished as any kettle out there.
Yes, you love keggles. WE GET IT.
 

Dog House Brew

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To each his own. I have all three. Mega Pot, Keggle, and a home fabricated BK. My least favorite is the keggle. Love how durable it is for sure. Heats slower than the other 2, but the tall narrow design I like. My favorite is the home fab kettle, The thickness is awesome, even though it's too heavy to move around. I really like the Mega Pot. Heavy duty and easy to move. I say get what is in the budget and easy to obtain.
 
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If that's the case, then [IMO] he's a p***y... :eek: It doesn't take much effort to trim that down to a very small amount. I did it in my BK, but left more on the MLT so that there was less heat loss and such.
Reasons I don't like keggles:
#1 - Many of the keggles circulating are stolen. It's a PIA to get them legally where I am (e.g. from CHI or other places - not worth the shipping cost in IMO)
#2 - I don't see the point of cutting the rim down to nothing, and I'm too big to get in there otherwise. The lack of being a p***y is more my problem(1).
#3 - They come in 1 size - 15 gallon - and the height doesn't translate well for a hop spider and a 5 gallon batch.
#4 - If i'm doing 50-100 batches a month on a kettle, you bet your @$$ the heating time makes a difference. Especially brewing indoors where I'll be forced to use NG instead of LP.

@Spike - post that drop-test video when you get a chance. Would love to see it!


(1) Goldie - I'll grant you I'm more of a p***y than i used to be - was able to get up to my shoulder in a corney keg the other day (vs up to my forearm). I need to get back in the gym.:(
 

maida7

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Is there any advantage to a triclad pot ( mega pot) verses a single layer pot ( stout blicmen) for boiling wort thanks in advance
I have a morebeer pot with the triclad bottom. I use it to boil my work. It works great and makes awesome beer. I have a friend who has a blichmann. His pot also makes great beer. I don't see a big difference. For a brew pot I would not base my decision on the triclad bottom.

I will say the morebeer pot is way heavy duty. Super thick steel very strong and very heavy. It will last a life time. Blichmann pots are thinner and lighter but definitely strong enough to do the job.

Keggles are nice and can be very affordable if you can find one without steeling it from a brewery. They make good pots. I prefer regular pots over keggles. I like to scrub everything when I finish brewing and reaching the bottom of a keggle is more difficult then most standard pots. I also find the flat bottom of regular pots will sit better on various burners. But these are minor things that can be easily worked around so if you have access to a legal keg that's definitely a good solution. Keggles definitely can make excellent beer.

But really it's yeast and fermentation that make great beer so while you need a pot, don't obsess over brands and such. They all will get the job done. :mug:
 
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