Trappist breweries in Europe that offer tours? Looking for recommendations

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Presbrewterian Pastor

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I may be making a trip overseas in a year or so. I'd love to visit some Trappist Abbeys that have breweries on site and offer tours. Any you're aware of or have been to?
 

Vale71

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As far as I know none offer any tours of the brewery or of the monastery grounds. The monks like to keep to themselves.
 

Spartan1979

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Your best shot would be La Trappe (Konigshoeven Abbey). They are the one that is best set up to accommodate tourists. I was with a tour group when I visited there and had a tour, so I can't say for sure that they have open tours, but there were more tours that day than just ours. I also toured Orval, but I know for sure that was specially arranged.

This is the tour I went on: Lonely Monks Trappist Tour — BBM! Belgian Beer Me! Tours

If you happen to sign up for this tour, tell Stu that Jerry Mitchell sent you.
 

Vale71

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" Note, most of the abbey interiors are typically cloistered and off limits to visitors. Many of the Trappist breweries are also off limits to the public, but BBM! does have a few connections that may make visiting some places generally not accessible to the public available to us, such as at Orval. "
 

riceral

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Yep. I went on the Lonely Monks tour with Stu a few years ago. Great time. Well worth looking into.
 

Craiginthecorn

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I did a one week silent retreat at the Gethsemani Abbey in Trappist, KY, in the heart of bourbon country. They did not brew, but instead made cheese and fudge. Parts of the abbey were accessible to the public for the worship services, which occur 5 times each day, the first of which is at 4 am, if I recall correctly. However, none of the working areas, like the dairy, were open to the public.

Due to overbooking, I stayed in the section which houses the monks. It's referred to as a cell. An appropriate term, given the simplicity of the rooms. Well, that's overstating it a bit, but it was similar to a 1960s college dormitory room.

Due investments needed in new refrigeration equipment and a dwindling number of young, strong monks, they have ceased making their Port Salut cheese, which is labor-intensive. I didn't care for it, myself.
 
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