transporting homebrew across state lines

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wstaufe

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The non-member search sucks, didn't see a sticky, and I'm tired of looking. Driving from SC to OH with about five kegs + bottles...bad idea??
 

mosquitocontrol

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Probably illegal. I'm currently driving from dc to ct as we speak with a keg, growlers, and bottles in the backseat of my convertible. Lots of sketchy towels tied around everything covering it up.
 
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wstaufe

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Probably illegal. I'm currently driving from dc to ct as we speak with a keg, growlers, and bottles in the backseat of my convertible. Lots of sketchy towels tied around everything covering it up.
LOL on sketchy towels- nice move. Found a full thread here:

https://www.homebrewtalk.com/f14/transporting-homebrew-across-state-lines-68602/

Telling people to drive safely so as to not get pulled over is lame- what if you get in an accident that was not your fault?
 

carnevoodoo

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I wouldn't worry about it. If there is a law about it at that level, I'm pretty sure any cop that stops you wouldn't know it either. Just be a good driver and not a dick and you'll be fine.
 

Decypher

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I ran into this problem last year when I drove from Central PA to Oregon for my buddy's wedding with eight kegs inside of my kegerator in the back of my pickup. I did a lot of research and found out that it depends on the state that you're driving through. It is NOT illegal to transport home made beer across state lines... as long as you're going from a state where homebrewing is legal, to a state where homebrewing is legal. As soon as you cross into a state where homebrewing isn't legal, it's a crime.

There's also restrictions on amounts. Say you're driving from a state that allows the production of 200 gallons of beer per person per year, and you're going to a state that allows the production of 200 gallons of beer per person per year, but you have to go through a state that only allows the production of twenty gallons of beer and you have six kegs, now you're breaking the law. I think some states also have laws on how much you can transport (Washington for example limits you to twenty gallons of beer that you can transport.)

The best way to find out which states allow homebrewing and transport is to go to the Homebrewers Association site and look up each individual state that you'll be driving through for laws on brewing and transport.

When I drove to Oregon, I had to go through Utard, and it was before they legalized homebrewing, so I was technically breaking the law.

I'll be heading to NC in two weeks to spend a week at the Outer Banks with my girlfriend's family. I'll be bringing six kegs with me and know that PA, MD, VA, and NC all allow brewing with volume restrictions greater than thirty gallons. However, Virginia has a limit on the transport of up to 15 gallons. Luckily, all six kegs are only half full. :D

My advice, figure out you're route, print off the statutes from each state for home production, and take them with you in case there is any question.

Enjoy you're trip.

~Darren
 

Brewmoor

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You should be good. Just don't take the long way and drive through Utah. They are really sketchy about transporting beer across their state. They still give out bootlegging tickets.
 

jjones17

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I ran into this problem last year when I drove from Central PA to Oregon for my buddy's wedding with eight kegs inside of my kegerator in the back of my pickup. I did a lot of research and found out that it depends on the state that you're driving through. It is NOT illegal to transport home made beer across state lines... as long as you're going from a state where homebrewing is legal, to a state where homebrewing is legal. As soon as you cross into a state where homebrewing isn't legal, it's a crime.

There's also restrictions on amounts. Say you're driving from a state that allows the production of 200 gallons of beer per person per year, and you're going to a state that allows the production of 200 gallons of beer per person per year, but you have to go through a state that only allows the production of twenty gallons of beer and you have six kegs, now you're breaking the law. I think some states also have laws on how much you can transport (Washington for example limits you to twenty gallons of beer that you can transport.)

The best way to find out which states allow homebrewing and transport is to go to the Homebrewers Association site and look up each individual state that you'll be driving through for laws on brewing and transport.

When I drove to Oregon, I had to go through Utard, and it was before they legalized homebrewing, so I was technically breaking the law.

I'll be heading to NC in two weeks to spend a week at the Outer Banks with my girlfriend's family. I'll be bringing six kegs with me and know that PA, MD, VA, and NC all allow brewing with volume restrictions greater than thirty gallons. However, Virginia has a limit on the transport of up to 15 gallons. Luckily, all six kegs are only half full. :D

My advice, figure out you're route, print off the statutes from each state for home production, and take them with you in case there is any question.

Enjoy you're trip.

~Darren
:off: It amazes me that some of my American comrades call us Canadians socialists with crappy laws like this. Wow... I mean... wow. These laws are like very minor fascism with only 1 beneficiary in mind: the huge beer corporations. :off:

Anyway, rant off: Darren makes a great point, I would be doing this if I lived in the US also. Whether you like a law or not, its not worth a fine or worse if you get caught IMO.
 

carnevoodoo

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These laws are like very minor fascism with only 1 beneficiary in mind: the huge beer corporations. :off:
That's actually not true at all. Most of these stupid laws are just left over from prohibition and people who are afraid of alcohol. Sure, there are laws that the big guys like, but these have nothing to do with it.
 

remilard

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Hahaha, a Canadian criticizing US alcohol laws as fascist or overreaching. From a European it might be a valid criticism.
 

shamrockdoc

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We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the drugs began to take hold. Suddenly, there was a terrible roar all around us, and the sky was full of what looked like huge bats, all swooping and screeching and diving around the car,
 

Decypher

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Hahaha, a Canadian criticizing US alcohol laws as fascist or overreaching. From a European it might be a valid criticism.
I don't know, I'm with jjones17 on this one. At least he's from BC and not Ontario. The LCBO makes most US liquor laws look lax, with the exception of Pennsylvania of course.
 

Denny

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A lot will depend on the state. In OR, the OLCC has recently ruled that it's illegal to even transport homebrew outside of your home. We've formed a group to get that changed.
 

jjones17

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That's actually not true at all. Most of these stupid laws are just left over from prohibition and people who are afraid of alcohol. Sure, there are laws that the big guys like, but these have nothing to do with it.
Well, it still sucks pretty bad. I guess its more accurate to say the laws are not REPEALED because it does not benefit any 'campaign contributing' corporation.

There are no laws in Canada that prohibit transporting homebrew accross 'provincial' lines. Not saying we're better (in fact our law system sucks worse than a broken vaccum, they may as well be handing out prizes to people who break the law), just saying that law is LAAAAAME. So lame. Lame lame lame.
 

shamrockdoc

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A lot will depend on the state. In OR, the OLCC has recently ruled that it's illegal to even transport homebrew outside of your home. We've formed a group to get that changed.
Are you serious oh crap I've been running my beers down to the family and father in law for about a year WA/OR. Plus FinL brews as well and I take his beer all the time...this is awesome ...I need to put a supercharger on the yellow sub sos ah kin out run Roscoe PeeKooTrain...GEEGEE GEEGEE GEEGEE
 

jjones17

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That's a pretty bold statement that I doubt is backed up by fact.
:off:
No offense, but I think the statement is anything but 'pretty bold', this type of thing is pretty standard practice. While it may not be 100% "historically accurate, backed up by references dating back to your forefathers", are most laws not made and unmade by political will? Geepers dude, you must be a politician !

Here, right back at ya:

Denny, you tell me my statement is bold. That itself is a bold statement. I doubt your assumption is backed up by fact. Provide references now. If you type something, it must be backed up by actual fact or it is too bold for the internet. Stand and be counted. Give me a break, D.

:off:
 
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:off: It amazes me that some of my American comrades call us Canadians socialists with crappy laws like this. Wow... I mean... wow. These laws are like very minor fascism with only 1 beneficiary in mind: the huge beer corporations. :off:

Anyway, rant off: Darren makes a great point, I would be doing this if I lived in the US also. Whether you like a law or not, its not worth a fine or worse if you get caught IMO.
Next time you are looking for that OT smiley, how about just not doing it. Thanks.
 
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We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the drugs began to take hold. Suddenly, there was a terrible roar all around us, and the sky was full of what looked like huge bats, all swooping and screeching and diving around the car,
woah, thanks hunter. I love that movie.

I'd say this is all much ado about nothing. Just don't be drinking it while traveling and I'm sure you have nothing to worry about.
 

Palefire

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Originally Posted by shamrockdoc
We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the drugs began to take hold. Suddenly, there was a terrible roar all around us, and the sky was full of what looked like huge bats, all swooping and screeching and diving around the car,

woah, thanks hunter. I love that movie.

I'd say this is all much ado about nothing. Just don't be drinking it while traveling and I'm sure you have nothing to worry about.

Man, if you liked the movie (I actually haven't seen it), go buy the book right now. Fun stuff. (Sorry, guess that's :off: - apologies).
 

MVKTR2

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When pondering topics such as these I find it best to inquire of the saints.

"An unjust law is no law at all", St. Augustus.

Schlante,
Phillip
 

brewmonk

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We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the drugs began to take hold. Suddenly, there was a terrible roar all around us, and the sky was full of what looked like huge bats, all swooping and screeching and diving around the car,
great book(s)!

they left hotel rooms in worse shape than *I* do!
 

abbot555

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" (c) Family beer or wine is removed from the home for private use, including use at organized affairs, exhibitions, or competitions such as homemaker's contests, tastings, or judging."

For WA. So would the "private use" mean I could take my homebrew camping, or even other places and drink it?
 

DoctorHops

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Not sure what the Utah laws are now, but when I lived there 30+ years ago, bootlegging tickets were nothing to sneeze at. Lots of Salt Lake City citizens would drive up to Evanston Wyoming to choose from the wider selection of beers that had been stored properly. The Utah State Liquor Monopoly had a very limited selection of beers that were not 3.2% abv in those days and everything was stored in unheated/uncooled warehouses. Same for wine.

Anyway, the Utah state police used to regularly go up to Evanston and cruise the liquor store parking lots for Utah cars. They would pull these same cars over when they returned to Utah and search the cars for liquor that did not have a Utah state liquor tax stamp on it. If found the liquor would be confiscated and sold at auction. The car would be confiscated and sold at auction. The car's occupants were cited for tax evasion. They had to pay the liquor tax.

Eventually Wyoming put their foot down and several times escorted Utah state police back to the state line.

I am not sure if this still goes on or not.
 

Brewmoor

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Not sure what the Utah laws are now, but when I lived there 30+ years ago, bootlegging tickets were nothing to sneeze at. Lots of Salt Lake City citizens would drive up to Evanston Wyoming to choose from the wider selection of beers that had been stored properly. The Utah State Liquor Monopoly had a very limited selection of beers that were not 3.2% abv in those days and everything was stored in unheated/uncooled warehouses. Same for wine.

Anyway, the Utah state police used to regularly go up to Evanston and cruise the liquor store parking lots for Utah cars. They would pull these same cars over when they returned to Utah and search the cars for liquor that did not have a Utah state liquor tax stamp on it. If found the liquor would be confiscated and sold at auction. The car would be confiscated and sold at auction. The car's occupants were cited for tax evasion. They had to pay the liquor tax.

Eventually Wyoming put their foot down and several times escorted Utah state police back to the state line.

I am not sure if this still goes on or not.
They are not as strict now as far as I know. They have changed a few laws so getting into a bar does not necessitate a membership. Though they still hand out bootlegging tickets. They profile cars coming in from Colorado to places like Moab and other spots where people go to camp and have fun. They were doing "random" checks (which means anyone with a colorado plate) two years ago, a guy from a mountain bike forum I am on got a ticket. He had to go back to court in moab. He tried to reason with the cop because all he had was a six pack in his cooler. The cop basically said, this is my town and the judge does not like outsiders so you better show up in court.

I have personally seen what the law does in moab if you are not careful. This spring I saw some guys in the campsite next to me get searched. They had some herbal issues, but I heard the cop asking about their "Colorado" beer. I have always been super careful going to or through Utah.
 

chemman14

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They are not as strict now as far as I know. They have changed a few laws so getting into a bar does not necessitate a membership. Though they still hand out bootlegging tickets. They profile cars coming in from Colorado to places like Moab and other spots where people go to camp and have fun. They were doing "random" checks (which means anyone with a colorado plate) two years ago, a guy from a mountain bike forum I am on got a ticket. He had to go back to court in moab. He tried to reason with the cop because all he had was a six pack in his cooler. The cop basically said, this is my town and the judge does not like outsiders so you better show up in court.

I have personally seen what the law does in moab if you are not careful. This spring I saw some guys in the campsite next to me get searched. They had some herbal issues, but I heard the cop asking about their "Colorado" beer. I have always been super careful going to or through Utah.
Just trying to protect their status as the most uncool state. haha
 

MaxStout

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They are not as strict now as far as I know. They have changed a few laws so getting into a bar does not necessitate a membership. Though they still hand out bootlegging tickets. They profile cars coming in from Colorado to places like Moab and other spots where people go to camp and have fun. They were doing "random" checks (which means anyone with a colorado plate) two years ago, a guy from a mountain bike forum I am on got a ticket. He had to go back to court in moab. He tried to reason with the cop because all he had was a six pack in his cooler. The cop basically said, this is my town and the judge does not like outsiders so you better show up in court.

I have personally seen what the law does in moab if you are not careful. This spring I saw some guys in the campsite next to me get searched. They had some herbal issues, but I heard the cop asking about their "Colorado" beer. I have always been super careful going to or through Utah.
Neighboring states are now profiling Colorado motorists, looking for weed.

The more things change, the more they stay the same. :mad:
 
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