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fl93

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I had 10 feet of 1/4" hose and was getting all foam. I switched to 10 feet of 3/16" hose and I am still getting all foam. My kegerator is at about 38 degrees and i have about 10 psi on the keg. Any help would be gratly appreciated.
 

Nuggethead

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If you carbed at 15psi and bled it off once before dropping to 10psi, it's probably still overcarbed. There is 5psi of carbonation that needs to come out of solution and equalize to 10psi. You may have to bleed it several times before it settles at 10psi. It took me over a week once to get an overcarbed keg to equalize. I run 10' 3/16 line and it would always foam, but once it equalized, I could run it up to 12psi and still have great pours, maybe even a little slower than ideal.
 
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I had major foaming issues when starting out kegging. Mostly because I was in too much of a hurry to get it carbed faster (high psi to start then lower to pour). Best bet is to leave the gas on at about 5-8 psi (serving psi) the whole time until it is ready. That worked for me for cobra picnic taps on a keezer, could be different depending on your line length and set-up etc.
 

TheBrewinator

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I recently did 21 PSI for 24 hours on my oatmeal cream stout then dropped to 7 PSI. After about a week it was just about perfect for a stout.

I decided to do an experiment with the APA I just kegged and did 30 PSI for 48 hours and ended up with nothing but foam after I dropped it to 10 PSI. It has since calmed down to good solid pours but I have determined boost carbing can't be much more than 24 hours if you want to get to a decent carb level relatively quickly. As other posters have said, you probably just need to get the keg purged and equilibrated at 10 PSI and your foaming issues should be solved.

I will note that this is all done with 10 feet of 3/16 tubing for both my serving lines.
 
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fl93

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I just Poured a beer and still getting foam. I am starting to wonder if my regulator is messed up. I shut off pressure to the keg and bleed off the keg off. When I turned the pessure back on it seemed like alot off pressure going in. Any ideas?
 

Nuggethead

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I had an ongoing issue like yours awhile back. No matter what I did, I never got a keg to stop foaming. Once I found the regulator was working fine I decided it must be the keg post/connector. I never could get it fixed, so I transferred to a ball lock keg and pressured up and no more problem. I had that happen with 2 different pin locks but it could be just bad luck on my part. I know several people that really like that style of keg.
 
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fl93

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I added another gauge inline and my regulator pressure gauge was way off. The inline gauge is reading 10 psi and the gauge on my regulator is at 0.
How many times should I purge the keg to get the beer to a normal carb level?
 

lotbfan

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Try turning off the gas and pour a few beers until nothing comes out. Let it sit a few hours and repeat. A few turns and the gas should have lost a lot of its punch with most of the co2 coming out of suspension. Once you have poured 4 or 5 beers, and it is coming out slow to nothing, turn your co2 to your serving pressure and let it sit over night (you just drank like 4 pints, it should be time for bed anyway).

In theory you could drop your co2 too far, but Ive never had that problem, with the beer cold in the fridge it takes a while for all of the gas to come out of suspension. If your setup won't allow any beer to flow without some sort of pressure going in, set it as low as possible, like 1 or 2, just to remove the vacuum lock.
 

brodie113

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I agree - seems like the beer still needs to let some CO2 out of solution.
 
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