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SnakeAnthony6375

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So, I've got an APA sitting in the secondary right now. It's been in there for 5 days with 1 oz. of Cascade pellets. It was in the primary for 2 weeks - too long, I know. The extended time in the primary brought on a bit of a soapy flavor - not awful or overpowering, but it's there nonetheless. That being said, should I not leave it in the secondary as long? I imagine that the yeast is still working (although slowly) in the secondary. I don't want the soapy flavor to intensify with the time spent in the secondary. Should I pull it out and bottle sooner because of this? I originally intended for it to be in the secondary for at least 1 week - most likely was going to be 2. Next batch of this APA is going to be in the primary for 7-10 days max and then be racked to the secondary for 2 weeks. Hopefully this will alleviate the soapy off-flavor.

Thanks!
 

McKBrew

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The two weeks in the primary did not contribute to what you perceive as a soapy flavor. There is actually newer information out there and several of us leave beer in the primary for a minimum of three weeks.

The off-flavor could be just "green" beer, or something else, but you really won't isolate it until it's bottled and aged a bit.
 

DonkeyShoes

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Actually, 10-14 days in primary is a minimum for many around here. I leave by beer in primary at least 14 days, often times longer. I only use secondary for extended aging (more than a month), or if I were to dry hop (like you are). Yeast autolysis, from what I've read, shouldn't occur until much longer than 14 days. Also, fermentation should be finished by the time you move to secondary.
 
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SnakeAnthony6375

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So what should I do to prevent this off-flavor from happening the next time? I'm not sure what 'green' beer is. My guess is it's just young or 'un-ripe'? If that's the case, this may just diminish on its own...?
 

Clonefarmer

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So what should I do to prevent this off-flavor from happening the next time? I'm not sure what 'green' beer is. My guess is it's just young or 'un-ripe'? If that's the case, this may just diminish on its own...?
Green is a term for young beer and wine. It does diminish after time.
 
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SnakeAnthony6375

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Damn you guys are fast on here!

Thanks for the help and advice...

Cheers!
 

Matt Up North

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Not only what they said, but that dry hopping is going to cover up a lot of the "off flavors" that you perceive, along with some time in the bottle. Patience, grasshopper, is a woman worth waiting for because she has some delicious beer at the end of the tunnel.

I personally, btw, go 2 weeks in primary and then crash cool it (to clarify) and then into my keg to begin carbing up. I drink it from then on, though it really tastes nice after about three weeks in the keg.
 
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