Too Intense?

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DieselBrewery

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Would an Imperial Stout brewed from all these ingredients be too intense? If so, please critique.

Base Malt and Specialty Grains:
Roasted Barley
Acidulated Malt
American Vienna
German Dark Munich
American 6-row Pale
Black Roasted Barley
Chocolate Rye Malt
Chocolate Wheat Malt
Belgian Chocolate Malt
English Chocolate Malt
American Chocolate Malt

Hops:
Warrior
Hallertau Mittelfruh
Tettnanger
Spalt Spalter

Adjuncts:
Rye Raw
Oats Raw
Wheat Raw
Barley Flaked

Yeast:
White Labs Irish Stout
 

FishinDave07

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Holy crap! That seems like a bit much...Why not 1 base malt (maybe another base malt, just half the amount of the first one), roast barley, 1 type of chocolate, and 1 adjunct. Check out some recipes in the database and maybe modify from there.
 

Chriso

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Is your goal to use up extra malts in your inventory? What is the main thing you're trying to accomplish with this recipe?

I vote to use Warrior for bittering, and then whichever of those Low-AA% hops you have for flavor/aroma. Just don't use all three of them, it'll "muddy" things up too much.

Malt-wise... well, without quantities, it's really hard to say.
- You'll want the roasted barley for sure. Up to 1 lb per 5 gallons is fairly safe for an Imperial Stout.
- Use some of the various Chocolate malts, again, up to about 3/4-1 lb, but I would personally leave the Choc Rye and the Choc Wheat out. Just blend the different Choc Malts as you see fit. If you have enough of just one variety, use that.
- You'll want a little Black Patent (Black Malt / Black Barley) - maybe 1/4 lb tops? If it is indeed Black Roasted Barley and the same ingredient as the Roasted Barley that you already listed, then ignore this line.
- You'll want mostly Pale malt for your base. Easily in excess of 14 lbs, depending on how high-alcohol you want this Imperial Stout to be.
- You could use a couple pounds of Munich, but you should try to find some Caramel or Crystal malts instead. Add about 1 lb of that to the recipe.

If you need some ideas for where to start, I'd read over the 888 RIS recipe. It's a great Russian Stout that almost everyone who was involved in the swap, has been enjoying the results of.

And beware of the White Labs Irish Ale Yeast, as it only has about 73-75% attenuation tops. So if your recipe is 1.100 OG, it will only attenuate down to 1.025-1.030. There's nothing WRONG with that on an Imperial Stout, I just wanted to make sure you were aware.
 

jrhammonds

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I love that you're putting this much in your batch. I'm all about the complexities. However, I might simplify it just a tad. My theory is that if you are using "substitution malts" (i.e., malts with the same lovibond and technique) then you can leave those out. For instance, are the chocolates THAT different? If so--put em in! But if the nuances are to slight--you might be better to save the belgian chocolate for another recipe.
In all, I'd say pick one chocolate--and put all the rest in there!
I did, however, notice that there was no caramel/crystal malts in your bill; and this is where I WOULD get complex. Throw in some 40L, 80L, and/or 120L to boost the mouthfeel and residual sweetness.

Good luck!
 
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