Time to Start Kegging

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A1sportsdad

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Finally ready to bite the bullet and get away from bottling and start kegging. Got a few initial questions, then more later for sure.

1. Corny kegs for sure. Have to find some reconditioned. Looking to pick up four. What’s a good price for a reconditioned Corny keg?
2. Pin lock or Ball lock? Any pros and cons?
3. What size CO2 tank? 5 or 10 lb tank? What’s a good price for a used tank?
4. What about regulators? Reconditioned okay with these?

Thanks for your input.
Tom
 

Konadog

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1. Seems the going price for used kegs is typically $39.99 (ball lock) from most places, you may find them cheaper on CL.
2. This depends on what your storing them in. Pin lock kegs are shorter than ball lock, and are a bit larger in circumference. Ball lock are taller and thinner.
3. C02 is cheaper in larger quantities, you may pay only a few $$ less to fill a #5 tank "vs" a #20 tank. Go with the largest you can.
4. You may find a used one from someone that works, but this is where I would buy new.

Check out some of the sponsors for keg and regulator deals, or watch HomeBrewFinds for sales and reviews.

Be patient and do your research before you purchase, good luck!
 
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A1sportsdad

A1sportsdad

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1. Seems the going price for used kegs is typically $39.99 (ball lock) from most places, you may find them cheaper on CL.
2. This depends on what your storing them in. Pin lock kegs are shorter than ball lock, and are a bit larger in circumference. Ball lock are taller and thinner.
3. C02 is cheaper in larger quantities, you may pay only a few $$ less to fill a #5 tank "vs" a #20 tank. Go with the largest you can.
4. You may find a used one from someone that works, but this is where I would buy new.

Check out some of the sponsors for keg and regulator deals, or watch HomeBrewFinds for sales and reviews.

Be patient and do your research before you purchase, good luck!
Thanks Konadog. Appreciate the feedback. Didn’t realize about the height difference of pin vs ball. Guess I better figure out freezer dimensions. I’ll also have to look at height of the CO2 tank. That sits in the freezer as well, correct?
 

sibelman

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Somehow I've formed the impression ball lock is far more common, which could simplify buying parts down the road. CO2 bottle can go in or out -- out requires finding a safe place to drill (or adding a collar to the freezer), but leaves more room inside. There are many HBT threads showing lovely keezer/kegerator builds. Best of luck with your move to kegging, @A1sportsdad.
 

Konadog

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Your choice on where to put your CO2 tank. I keep mine outside so I have more room inside, but I have 4 kegs on tap and try to have 1 or 2 waiting. I use ball lock so I can fit 6 kegs in mine. If it were pin lock, 5 would fit I think, if not, only 4.

There is a huge thread somewhere on freezer sizes and how kegs fit.

I would first decide on what you want to build and how many kegs, and search from there.
 

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Ball lock kegs are easy to locate both used and new. It also means you'll have one set of QDs for every keg and not need to worry about future keg purchases needing different QD types. Pin lock are ONLY available used.
There are a good amount of online stores that sell used/recon ball lock kegs. Or, as mentioned already, look on CL or the classifieds here for some in your area.
Check your LHBS to see what they carry for tanks. If they do swaps, then see what sizes they do that with. I have four sizes right now. A 2.5#, 5#, 10# and 20#. The 20 is connected up to the kegs in my keezer. The 10# is currently for my conical fermenters for either purging/sealing, carbonating a batch (via a carbonating stone) or pushing beer out when filling serving kegs and cans (or if I decide to put a batch into bottles). I'll probably be looking to get rid of the 2.5# at some point since it's not convenient for me for a few reasons.
I would always go with a new regulator these days. My first was one that a local person reconditioned that I got for a decent rate. But my other regulators have all been new Taprite models. Both single and dual body, CO2 and nitro mix.

Also, for the CO2 source/tank, check to see if you have any welding gas suppliers close to you that also carry beverage gasses. I have two chains in my area, as well as my LHBS where I can get CO2 and nitro mix. There's a third supplier that I'll probably go to when I need to get a new O2 tank.

For the keezer, do yourself a favor and build at least a short collar. You'll be able to run your faucet shanks through that, making it easier. You can also run the gas line(s) through it and keep the CO2 tank outside. Get a gas manifold and put that inside to feed all your kegs. There are more benefits to having the gas bottle outside the keezer than having it inside.
1. More room for kegs. Even if you put the CO2 tank on the hump, you're removing a potential spot for a keg (3 gallon kegs fit on the hump).
2. Zero cold influence on the CO2 tank. Cold will change the reading on the high pressure side.
3. Easier to see the regulator and make pressure level changes without opening up the keezer. Which means no temperature fluctuations that the keezer will then need to offset.

I've had my 20# tank outside the keezer I have now (with a collar built with 2x8 boards) since the start. I also had it outside the 10 cubic foot fridge I used before the keezer. I have room in the keezer for 8 full size (up to 6 gallon Torpedo) kegs plus two more up to 3 gallon on the hump. Although part of the space is being used for beer I put into cans.
 
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A1sportsdad

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Ball lock kegs are easy to locate both used and new. It also means you'll have one set of QDs for every keg and not need to worry about future keg purchases needing different QD types. Pin lock are ONLY available used.
There are a good amount of online stores that sell used/recon ball lock kegs. Or, as mentioned already, look on CL or the classifieds here for some in your area.
Check your LHBS to see what they carry for tanks. If they do swaps, then see what sizes they do that with. I have four sizes right now. A 2.5#, 5#, 10# and 20#. The 20 is connected up to the kegs in my keezer. The 10# is currently for my conical fermenters for either purging/sealing, carbonating a batch (via a carbonating stone) or pushing beer out when filling serving kegs and cans (or if I decide to put a batch into bottles). I'll probably be looking to get rid of the 2.5# at some point since it's not convenient for me for a few reasons.
I would always go with a new regulator these days. My first was one that a local person reconditioned that I got for a decent rate. But my other regulators have all been new Taprite models. Both single and dual body, CO2 and nitro mix.

Also, for the CO2 source/tank, check to see if you have any welding gas suppliers close to you that also carry beverage gasses. I have two chains in my area, as well as my LHBS where I can get CO2 and nitro mix. There's a third supplier that I'll probably go to when I need to get a new O2 tank.

For the keezer, do yourself a favor and build at least a short collar. You'll be able to run your faucet shanks through that, making it easier. You can also run the gas line(s) through it and keep the CO2 tank outside. Get a gas manifold and put that inside to feed all your kegs. There are more benefits to having the gas bottle outside the keezer than having it inside.
1. More room for kegs. Even if you put the CO2 tank on the hump, you're removing a potential spot for a keg (3 gallon kegs fit on the hump).
2. Zero cold influence on the CO2 tank. Cold will change the reading on the high pressure side.
3. Easier to see the regulator and make pressure level changes without opening up the keezer. Which means no temperature fluctuations that the keezer will then need to offset.

I've had my 20# tank outside the keezer I have now (with a collar built with 2x8 boards) since the start. I also had it outside the 10 cubic foot fridge I used before the keezer. I have room in the keezer for 8 full size (up to 6 gallon Torpedo) kegs plus two more up to 3 gallon on the hump. Although part of the space is being used for beer I put into cans.
Lots of good information there. Will definitely keep the CO2 tank outside. More room for beer or storing some that’s bottled.
Yeah, I was planning on adding a collar regardless for mounting the taps.
All good. This will be fun. 😁
 

Dland

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Finally ready to bite the bullet and get away from bottling and start kegging. Got a few initial questions, then more later for sure.

1. Corny kegs for sure. Have to find some reconditioned. Looking to pick up four. What’s a good price for a reconditioned Corny keg?
2. Pin lock or Ball lock? Any pros and cons?
3. What size CO2 tank? 5 or 10 lb tank? What’s a good price for a used tank?
4. What about regulators? Reconditioned okay with these?

Thanks for your input.
Tom
Answers to ones I know;

Ball lock supposed to be better, but since I've got a lot of pin locks, they are what I use.

I have 20# tanks, one for carbonating & dispense, one for transfers and similar, one in reserve. All are Airgas exchange tanks as that is all that is availble. If you are somewhare you can get own tanks filled easily, it is a different story of course.

Splurge and buy yourself a decent two gauge regulator. They are not that expensive and makes me wonder what reconditioned means, (like someone filled Bourdon tube w beer by mistake and returned?), would skip the small savings. That said, a well made older regulator that has not been abused could work for decades.
 

Spundit

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Good info above. I bought a kegging system recently so I can give you my experience.

1. I bought the loose bottom kegs at AIH. These are under $30. They look a little rough but mine were fully functional.

2. I went ball lock. They are a bit cheaper and more fit in my keezer.

3. I went with a 10lb tank as it was the biggest that would fit in the keezer. I would go bigger if it would fit. I bought a used steel tank online for $60ish and then swapped it at the local AirGas welding shop for $20.

4. I would buy a new name brand regulator. I bought a taprite dual gauge.

I also recommend you look at the Evabarrier tubing and duotight fittings. I am using them for both gas and air. They are affordable and Real easy to install and uninstall.
 

Golddiggie

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I'm "old school" on the connections on my system using swivel nuts everywhere. I also use Oetiker clamps since worm clamps SUCK.
I wouldn't go with a steel tank for CO2. Aluminum tanks are easy to get and much lighter. More important once you go above the 5# tank size. You also don't need to worry about condensation causing surface rust on them.

I have been changing my tubing over to the Ultra Barrier lines (from MoreBeer). Especially the gas lines since they're more flexible than the old red, double wall, lines I have been using. I need to get some more to keep plugging away at changing things over.

When you build the collar, put some kind of insulation on the inside of the wood. I went with 1/2" thick neoprene on mine (adhesive backed making installation easy). It does a really good job of keeping the temperatures stable, thus the keezer runs less often.

Get a controller that has a probe that can go inside the keezer. I simply drilled a hole through the collar, at the back, and ran that inside. Set your compressor delay (on the controller) to at least 3 minutes (mine is set to 5 minutes) to prevent killing the compressor by 'short cycling' it. Years back, before the controllers became more affordable (and there were more options) people used to hack the control on the freezer itself. IMO, you no longer need to do that since you can easily get an affordable controller that offers a regular socket for the freezer power cord to plug into. You can get one where you'll need to wire the power feeds up to it, but I'd still configure that so you simply plug the freezer into a socket. That way, IF you ever want to change it back into a regular freezer, it's easy.

There are also threads posted by people that made keezers. Good to get ideas from at the very least.

Also, make sure you look at the sizing of the freezers and how many kegs will fit. Get the actual inside dimensions of the freezer (both the hump and full depth) so you can see how many kegs will fit. I'd highly recommend getting one that will hold more than the four kegs you originally posted. Getting one that will hold 5 or 6 means you're ready in case you have a batch ready but the tap isn't available. Of course, you COULD always install more taps. ;) I currently only have six on my keezer collar.
 

day_trippr

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fwiw, "Ultra Barrier" tubing - or any tubing product from EJ Beverage Tubing Inc - is a huge step back in current performance compared to EVABarrier tubing. As compared to standard solid PVC tubing such as Bevlex 200, "Ultra Barrier" oxygen permeability is 70% lower. Good, but meanwhile, EVABarrier tubing is a couple of orders of magnitude lower, even better than PET...

Cheers!
 

Spundit

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I wouldn't go with a steel tank for CO2
Just to clarify, I recommend buying a used steel tank if you will be using a co2 vendor that does exchanges (basically any of the national gas suppliers like Airgas, Praxair, etc). I bought cheap steel tank and was given an aluminum tank on every subsequent swap.
 

Golddiggie

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Just to clarify, I recommend buying a used steel tank if you will be using a co2 vendor that does exchanges (basically any of the national gas suppliers like Airgas, Praxair, etc). I bought cheap steel tank and was given an aluminum tank on every subsequent swap.
To me, that's just less than honorable. Sure, it might seem "OK" if you're a skinflint, but why not just get a cheap aluminum tank from the start if you're getting an used one? Even one that's out of date would be better. Since those CAN be tested and put back into circulation.

I bought my 20# tank back in 2011 with a good date stamp on it. Got it filled and been using it ever since. Yes, I'm still on that initial filling of the tank. When it finally shows empty, I'll take it for a swap. BUT, I bought it with a good date on it initially. It's no one's fault that it's lasted this long. I COULD get it tested and then filled, but I'll probably not want to wait for that. So I'll just swap it for a currently filled tank and probably go another 10+ years before needing to do it again.
 

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Ball lock cornies. As large a tank as you can get locally swapped. (consider swapping 20 lb tanks at your local hydroponics store) I'd setup all your connections with flared thread fittings for versatilty of using DUOtight fittings that can interchange with commercial kegs. You didn't ask, but I'd look for a bottom fridge/top freezer. These make great kegerators. For the regulators, it's up to you. I've rebuilt them and they work fine. It's just a diaphragm that dries out over time. They either leak or they dont.
 
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A1sportsdad

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Ball lock cornies. As large a tank as you can get locally swapped. (consider swapping 20 lb tanks at your local hydroponics store) I'd setup all your connections with flared thread fittings for versatilty of using DUOtight fittings that can interchange with commercial kegs. You didn't ask, but I'd look for a bottom fridge/top freezer. These make great kegerators. For the regulators, it's up to you. I've rebuilt them and they work fine. It's just a diaphragm that dries out over time. They either leak or they dont.
I was going to go with a chest freezer. Want the room for at least 4 Cornys in there.
 
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I have no strong opinions on any of this.
Look for reconditioned and pressure tested kegs for <$45
Go for a new regulator with a warranty - unless you get a super Craigslist deal with kegerator taps, kegs, reg and tank.
 

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I have built one over the last year for 4 taps and here’s my feedback.

for tank in/out you may find that a tank is a good spot inside for using the space over the compressor hump.

start everything with duotight fittings and Eva barrier lines. 4mm for beer and 5mm for gas. So easy to make changes and clean everything and the beer line is great for shorter length and keeping everything neat and tidy while getting good pours.

have more kegs than taps. I am expanding my kegs so that I can lager and bulk age beers in kegs. This can be longer term as well, don’t need to start with more than you need.

when you first build it keep things setup so you can move and adjust. I haven’t moved my taps but everything else has been moved more than once as I’ve learned how to set it up best.
It’s also a good place to store harvested yeast. I’ve built some shelves into it.

get fans and dehumidifiers. You will need it with a Keezer. In hindsight I would do a fridge but they are harder to find. When my freezer kicks this is what I’ll change over to.
 

apache_brew

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I was going to go with a chest freezer. Want the room for at least 4 Cornys in there.
Similar to what @Beermeister32 mentioned, a conventional fridge makes easy work of loading full kegs as well as not requiring additional temperature/humidity control. Also, depending on where you are, they're more likely to be available for cheap or even free via Craigslist and the like. I can fit 6 ball lock cornies in mine. (4) 1/6th bbl sankes (maybe 5..) I find the freezer section to be perfect for storing hops and keeping all things beer making related out of the house.


IMG_1177.JPG
 

Murph4231

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I agree with apache_brew, a used fridge is easier to get kegs in and out of plus they are easier to find. If you are young and plan on sticking with this hobby, I suggest you purchase new corny kegs. AIG and others offer them for $75. Why pay more than half price for some ugly tank that may or may not last very long. And for your regulator, buy a new taprite or perlic, they will last a life time and are easy to repair when the time comes, and the time will come. I agree with those here who suggest a 20lb CO2 tank, if your LHBS does refills then get a new aluminum tank that too will last a lifetime.

Good luck, keep brewing, relax and have a homebrew,
 

Spundit

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To me, that's just less than honorable. Sure, it might seem "OK" if you're a skinflint, but why not just get a cheap aluminum tank from the start if you're getting an used one?
Ugh.. I am only replying here so the OP understands his options. I have bee called worse than a dishonorable skin flint. Haha

If you live in an area we're the CO2 vendors only do CO2 swaps it makes little sense to pay more for the aluminum tank or to buy a new tank. When you show up to have your tank filled you will be given a different used tank that may be steel or may be aluminum. The big vendors do not differentiate between aluminum and steel. Search this forum and you will find lots of threads from unhappy folks who bought a nice new aluminum tank only to have it swapped out for a beat up steel one.

If you really want an aluminum tank, be sure to call your local co2 suppliers to ensure someone will refill tanks (not swap). I would have to drive 60 miles to have a tank refilled and I don't think that's uncommon.
 

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Ugh.. I am only replying here so the OP understands his options. I have bee called worse than a dishonorable skin flint. Haha

If you live in an area we're the CO2 vendors only do CO2 swaps it makes little sense to pay more for the aluminum tank or to buy a new tank. When you show up to have your tank filled you will be given a different used tank that may be steel or may be aluminum. The big vendors do not differentiate between aluminum and steel. Search this forum and you will find lots of threads from unhappy folks who bought a nice new aluminum tank only to have it swapped out for a beat up steel one.

If you really want an aluminum tank, be sure to call your local co2 suppliers to ensure someone will refill tanks (not swap). I would have to drive 60 miles to have a tank refilled and I don't think that's uncommon.
Or you can simply go to your LHBS and get the tank from them and then swap it out each time with them as well. I bought my aluminum tanks many years back. I got aluminum due to the weight saving on that initial fill/volume. Not to mention how I don't need to worry about rust issues on the tank body. Even getting an aluminum tank that's outside of it's date stamp would be better (should be cheap too) since they'll inspect them and then decide if they're worth getting tested and certified again. From what I've been seeing, there are very few steel tanks actually out there or in distribution these days. 10+ years ago it was different. Distributing aluminum tanks makes a LOT more sense than sending the steel ones around. Weight difference for the truck is just one reason.
 

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I swap my CO2 tanks out and they don't worry about the certification date. I've asked them about it and they just said they get expired tanks all the time and the testing/certification is just built into the swap out price.
 

IslandLizard

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Re: CO2 tanks.
Check around in your area (call around!) and get the skinny on swaps, refills, and pricing. Pricing may vary wildly. (e.g., I was quoted $3.60 a pound regardless of fill size, $72 for 20#, while I can get a 20# swap for $25 pretty much anywhere). Are refills done while you wait or do you have to leave it there, which incurs a 2nd trip, etc.

It only makes sense to buy a brand new CO2 tank if you can get it filled for a decent price, and preferably while you wait. Otherwise it will be swapped for whatever is in their yard when you show up.

If you decide to get your tank filled, it will need recertification (hydro test) every 5 years (there's a stamp in the neck), at around $30 and a week or so turn around. Or then just swap it for something amicable.
 

odie

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I swap my CO2 tanks out and they don't worry about the certification date. I've asked them about it and they just said they get expired tanks all the time and the testing/certification is just built into the swap out price.
Not always...

one of the big gas suppliers here will look at your tank and not take an expired one. But they will gladly take your brand new tank and give you one that's almost expired in return...not very equitable...

Another big gas supplier here doesn't even look at the dates...the recert is just factored into the price so it averages out fairly for everyone...the price difference? less than a buck....

so guess who gets all my business now? I have ten 20# tanks...it's a disease...
 

IslandLizard

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Ball lock = VHS

Pin Lock = Betamax

that's about it...both are perfectly fine but more options with ball lock
:off:
Interesting comparison!

Betamax was far superior to VHS, quality wise. We can't say the same about pin locks, they're equal in quality to ball locks which were introduced later. Ball locks are now much more common.

If you want to connect your pin lock kegs to a ball lock jockey box, make sure to bring adapters or your own pin lock QDs and lines. We get pin lock kegs at homebrew events, occasionally.
 

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To me, that's just less than honorable. Sure, it might seem "OK" if you're a skinflint, but why not just get a cheap aluminum tank from the start if you're getting an used one? Even one that's out of date would be better. Since those CAN be tested and put back into circulation.

I bought my 20# tank back in 2011 with a good date stamp on it. Got it filled and been using it ever since. Yes, I'm still on that initial filling of the tank. When it finally shows empty, I'll take it for a swap. BUT, I bought it with a good date on it initially. It's no one's fault that it's lasted this long. I COULD get it tested and then filled, but I'll probably not want to wait for that. So I'll just swap it for a currently filled tank and probably go another 10+ years before needing to do it again.
Less than honorable? That what exchanges do. You might buy a very nice shiny tank, and exchange for a grungy old steel tank. Depends on what they have. Refilling is different. You can keep your tank. Exchanges are built around the idea that you do not have to check the Cert Date, just bring in an exchange for what they have (and they may give you one that is only good for a month). I prefer the Al tanks because of the weight, but have had to take steel as that is all they had.

Same with propane exchanges. I had a Barn fire (unrelated to brewing) and had several propane tanks that were outside the barn cook off. I found that Americagas will recycle the old burnt tanks. I called the corporate office, and they told me to just recycle (exchange) them at any of their location, even if they were in a fire and "toast" (literally).
 

IslandLizard

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Re: Propane tanks

I found that Americagas will recycle the old burnt tanks.
That's what Amerigas (Blue Rhino, and similar ilk) are only good for, exchange of old, outdated, worn out or burnt out tanks. :D
They shorten fills to 80% of nominal... so you only get 16# instead of 20#. The expansion reserve is already built in a tank, doh!

I always get my propane filled at a local concrete plant/rental outfit. I get a true 20# fill. They've never really checked the date (it's 10 years for propane tanks), the tanks look splendid and are heavy!
Many U-Haul places also fill them (convenient), as does BJ's (best pricing!)
 

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I use Tractor Supply to get fills but they do check the date. I am very familiar with how the dates work. If we have one get out of date, we exchange it. Unfortunately, you may get an exchange that only has a little time left as you have no choice. We have found that the fill method is also about half the cost and you do get a full tank (they use a scale for the fill).

There is also a limited amount of tanks they will fill if you have an enclosed transport (3, I think.)

There is a place that used to fill tanks, but charged a set fee similar to exchange so you lose the benefit of lower cost. I have not been back there and do not know if the fill tanks anymore.
 

Romex2121

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(It only makes sense to buy a brand new CO2 tank if you can get it filled for a decent price, and preferably while you wait)

Before I bought my new kegging set up I did call the welding supply store prior to verify they would fill the NEW 5 gallon tank and they said yes , what they didn’t tell me was it would be at their leisure meaning it could be a week or more before they filled it .
It was almost like they were punishing me for not giving up the shiny new tank and doing the swap thing, I eventually gave in and started swapping tanks just because it was such a hassle not to …
Buy a used tank and swap that sucker !!
 

superiorsat

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Can't go wrong with taprite, ball lock, and big CO2 tanks. There is a reason people build hoists for getting beer in and out of keezers just saying.
Then there is this😲.
I bought my 20# tank back in 2011 with a good date stamp on it. Got it filled and been using it ever since. Yes, I'm still on that initial filling of the tank. When it finally shows empty, I'll take it for a swap. BUT, I bought it with a good date on it initially. It's no one's fault that it's lasted this long. I COULD get it tested and then filled, but I'll probably not want to wait for that. So I'll just swap it for a currently filled tank and probably go another 10+ years before needing to do it again.
I wish I could find a magic tank like this! I've got 4 20# ( all steel), and 2 5#( both aluminum) tanks that all are on a regular fill or swap rotation. 4 on kegerators and 2 for stand by or mobile processes.
 
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RolandD

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Interesting comparison!

Betamax was far superior to VHS, quality wise. We can't say the same about pin locks, they're equal in quality to ball locks which were introduced later. Ball locks are now much more common.

If you want to connect your pin lock kegs to a ball lock jockey box, make sure to bring adapters or your own pin lock QDs and lines. We get pin lock kegs at homebrew events, occasionally.
I'm going even further off topic with it.

Not only is it an interesting comparison, but apt as well.

Sony introduced Betamax as a proprietary format with expensive licencing to use. JVC introduced VHS as an open format available to be used by anyone. This caused VHS to become the dominant format.

Coca-cola introduced pin-lock as a proprietary QD. Pepsi introduced ball-lock and allowed others to use it without licensing. This caused ball-locks to become the dominant QD.

I buy used pin-lock kegs and convert them to ball-lock. Initially, this was so they would fit in my mini-fridge. Now it's just for convenience.

+1 On EVA Barrier tubing, Duotight fittings, and Oetiker clamps. For the collar, look into PVC lumber. I used 5/4" x 6" PVC for my collar. Easy to work with and none of the drawbacks of having a wooden collar.

Also, spend the extra on forward sealing, stainless steel taps, and tap springs if you have a cat.Keezer.jpg
 

eric19312

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Another vote for EVA barrier tubing for beer and gas. Get the duo tight fittings and the system goes together like legos.
Also another vote for Ball lock kegs. They have that useful PRV and don't require a special socket wrench to tear down. Usually more will fit in a freezer or keezer.
I did add a sanke tap to my kegerator so I can run a commercial "guest" keg.
 

IslandLizard

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Also another vote for Ball lock kegs. They have that useful PRV and don't require a special socket wrench to tear down. Usually more will fit in a freezer or keezer.
3 pluses for using (real) ball lock kegs instead of (converted) pin locks. Due to their slightly narrower profile, I can fit 5 ball locks in my upright keezer, but only 4 pin locks, if I had those.

I did acquire a few (used) ball lock kegs that came with pin lock lids, PRVs unaccessible under a dome. They've become spares now, although it's also fairly easy to pop a QD on the gas post to vent a keg when needed, but a bit harder to control exactly.
 
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