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Thoughts on moving pail or carboy during fermentation?

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XXXXX

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I need to move my pail during fermentation. How will this affect the beer? The move will be within my home, so I expect relatively little agitation during the move.

I imagine some sediment will be kicked up, and will re-settle with additional racking time. Is this the only detriment to moving a pail or carboy during fermentation?

Thanks,

XXXXX
 

ChshreCat

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There's some possibility of oxidation, so you'll want to be as careful and gentle as possible to keep splashing and whatnot to a minimum. Beyond that and leaving it for a few days or a week after to settle, it's not a big issue.
 

tbel

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Now I am very new, so bear with me. Wouldn't there be a head of CO2 built up in the bucket? Thus minimizing even more the risk of oxidation?
 

woodstone

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Now I am very new, so bear with me. Wouldn't there be a head of CO2 built up in the bucket? Thus minimizing even more the risk of oxidation?
Yes...move it and don't worry. Might actually help settle some of the yeast from the sides of the vessel and help to clear before transfer. I say this trusting you are not moving to another state via horse and buggy on a rutted dirt road! Oh yea, you said in the house. Seriously, move it...don't worry one bit.
 
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XXXXX

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Right on, fellas. I've moved it and other than some minor rocking action, there was no splashing, so whatever oxygen was in the headspace is very unlikely to have dissolved into the beer.

Thanks!

:)
 

SKMO

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Oxidation is a really jacked-up topic. Everybody talks about it, but few people on the homebrewing level have actually experienced it, to the extent it was a "problem". Everybody looks for problems that generally do not exist, and regurgitates internet chatter they have no basis to form an opinion upon.

When you move your fermenter around you will stir up the yeast bed, and might see a bit of increased fermentation activity for a day or two, as you woke up some sleepers.

Otherwise, chill. The beer / yeast is going to do do what it is designed to do, no matter how much you worry about it.

It's a done deal.
 

ChshreCat

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Now I am very new, so bear with me. Wouldn't there be a head of CO2 built up in the bucket? Thus minimizing even more the risk of oxidation?
Yep, but once you start to move it you're going to start disturbing that layer. Didn't say it was a huge danger. Just something to be cautious of. :mug:
 

paraordnance

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I move my fermenting carboys around all the time. From closet to freezer, from freezer to countertop. As long as you carefull you should be ok, oxidizing is not an issue in this case, you really have to shake it hard to oxidize your brew.
 

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If you're moving a pail or a plastic carboy you may experience suck back, where the water in your airlock ends up in the beer. You can get around this problem by draining the airlock before moving it, but don't forget to refill the airlock when the move is complete.

-a.
 
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XXXXX

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If you're moving a pail or a plastic carboy you may experience suck back, where the water in your airlock ends up in the beer. You can get around this problem by draining the airlock before moving it, but don't forget to refill the airlock when the move is complete.

-a.
That's a good point too, especially in the plastic carboys. The plastic lids on my pails aren't exactly air tight (I rarely see airlock movement, regardless of how much fermentation...it comes out around rim).

Because the bung would make such a good seal on a plastic carboy at the opening of an otherwise-impermeable vessel, I would imagine suck-back would be substantial.

This thread is good. Good thoughts and perspectives being thrown around. Keep it up! :)
 

flabyboy

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I would think that the CO2 production would push whatever O2 was in the fermenter out the airlock. There is probably very little to no o2 in that headspace to oxygenate your beer with. i have moved mine without any problems
 

emjay

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There's a fair amount of O2 in the headspace, just somewhat less than the air outside the airlock. It's not even close to oxygen free though, but it's only touching the surface of the beer so it's not going to produce a noticeable oxidized taste unless you're constantly swirling it, sloshing it around, etc. Bottom line... don't ferment your beers in the back of a truck.
 

tbel

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I would think that the CO2 production would push whatever O2 was in the fermenter out the airlock. There is probably very little to no o2 in that headspace to oxygenate your beer with.
That's what I was getting at.
 

tbel

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CO2 is what about 32% heavier than O2. O2 being 32 amu and CO2 44amu. It stands to reason the heavier gas (CO2) will sit on top and push (displace) the lighter (O2) out. I'm not claiming ALL O2 is pushed out but I'd bet 90% or more is. Does anyone have any actual data on this?
 
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XXXXX

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CO2 is what about 32% heavier than O2. O2 being 32 amu and CO2 44amu. It stands to reason the heavier gas (CO2) will sit on top and push (displace) the lighter (O2) out. I'm not claiming ALL O2 is pushed out but I'd bet 90% or more is. Does anyone have any actual data on this?
Yes, that's correct. CO2 is heavier than air (O2--oxygen--included), it's the same reason people die of asphyxiation in enclosed areas where there is a leak; it displaces the air (and oxygen).

I was more concerned about disturbing the yeast physically than oxidizing the beer.
 

emjay

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CO2 is what about 32% heavier than O2. O2 being 32 amu and CO2 44amu. It stands to reason the heavier gas (CO2) will sit on top and push (displace) the lighter (O2) out. I'm not claiming ALL O2 is pushed out but I'd bet 90% or more is. Does anyone have any actual data on this?
Just consider the composition of air at ground level and the fact that you're nit choking on CO2 at this very moment.
 

SilentAutumn

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If you're moving a pail or a plastic carboy you may experience suck back, where the water in your airlock ends up in the beer. You can get around this problem by draining the airlock before moving it, but don't forget to refill the airlock when the move is complete.

-a.
That's one of the reasons I use whiskey in my airlocks. No bugs are going to grow in that, so a little suck back won't hurt anything.
 

tbel

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Just consider the composition of air at ground level and the fact that you're nit choking on CO2 at this very moment.
But if I were in a closed system with an airlock on it I would be choking. ;)

I really don't think this is going anywhere and we are apperently not helping the OP.
 

ajf

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That's one of the reasons I use whiskey in my airlocks. No bugs are going to grow in that, so a little suck back won't hurt anything.
Even if you use water (like I do), I doubt you would get any problems if you put the cap on the airlock, but not replacing the fluid after the move could cause problems, especially if you drop the temperature.

-a.
 
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