Third batch of brewing, still a beginner. Directions say to let ferment between 64-72 degrees, my basement is 62 but I have my fermenter insulated

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italianorose

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F30951BB-6D81-44C5-A5E3-FF7C22095CC7.jpeg

Is this okay? Sorry for poor quality, it’s in my basement that is going to be remodeled this summer.

Its going to be a yeungling clone, and it’s an ale yeast because doing lager is past my capability right now
 

RM-MN

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While there is an optimum temperature range for the yeast, I often start my beer at a cooler temp and let the yeast warm the beer as they eat the sugar. If possible, I put the beer in a room that is 62 degrees and at the peak of fermentation the beer temp will be about 64, right at the bottom of the recommended range. This gets me a very clean ferment with minimal esters.
 

IslandLizard

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The yeast will actually generate heat when it gets going - so it will usually be a couple of degrees above room temp. I‘d remove the insulation.
I removed, thank you. I didn’t think of the internal heat itself
Fermentation is a biochemical process. Most of those processes are exothermic, generating heat.
Higher temps usually speed up those processes, generating more heat, speeding up the processes even more, and so on. Faster is not better in the case of making beer, so we want to control the speed of fermentation, and we do that by controlling the temps, keeping them in a small, optimal range.

In the early stages of fermentation we need to curb the temp rise. While later on, after the "big event" is over and things slow down, we want to keep or even raise the temps somewhat to keep the yeast engaged and let her "do her thing."

Although it highly depends on the yeast strain used, 62F is a good environmental temp for the bulk of fermentation to take place, it may rise to 64F, that can be good. But once it slows down it tends to benefit to keep it at 64F (or a slightly higher temp) to finish out and condition.
 

hotbeer

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I've fermented all my ales at 68-69°F (≈20°C). Most with US-05 yeast.

Cooler temps might just mean longer in the fermenter. It will likely give you a cleaner taste with less fruity esters.

Which Yuengling? Most of their stuff is lager isn't it. Daring to be different with cloning it as an ale! :thumbsup: Good for you.
 

Beermeister32

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If you are doing a faux-lager, get online and research the temperature range of the ale yeast they gave you. Try to push the fermentation temperature to the bottom of that range. Keep in mind the fermentation temperature will add 2-5F degrees or so.

To mimic lagers you want to minimize fruity esters. Ale yeast can give off a lot of esters, you want to suppress that when making a faux-lager. You want a clean fermentation, usually that is at the bottom of the ale fermentation range. In fact, if it were me, I'd push it down even further by a few degrees.
 
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