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morris1980

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i have brewed three batches of beer that were all different but they all had the same off flavor. Could this just be my water or is there something else that could cause this
 

Yooper

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could you define the flavor you're getting? Is it "plastic-y" or like band-aids? How about twangy? Maybe it could be described as "hot"? What about like green apples, or cider-like?

Different flavors have different causes. Some common causes are chlorine or chloramines in the water, or high temperatures during fermentation. If you can nail down the flavor, and/or give us the ingredients and some of the details about each brew, we could help you figure it out.
 
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morris1980

morris1980

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it is twangy the brews where all kits red ale, nut brown and american cream ale the first 2 i got the temp to 80 df and the third to about 70
 

llazy_llama

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Sounds like it might be extract twang to me. Try a late extract addition (adding extract in the last 15 minutes or so of the boil) and see if that helps.

Edited: This is assuming you're talking about extract brewing, not all grain brewing.
 

carnevoodoo

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it is twangy the brews where all kits red ale, nut brown and american cream ale the first 2 i got the temp to 80 df and the third to about 70
You are fermenting your beer way too hot. You need to pitch your yeast and keep it controlled to around 68 degrees. 80 degrees will throw a ton of fusels and an almost fruity off taste.
 

llazy_llama

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Ah, good catch. I assumed he was talking about pitching temps with numbers that high.

morris: each yeast strain has a specific recommended temperature range that you'll want to keep your beer within while it's fermenting. You should be able to find that info on the packet/vial, or on the yeast producers website.
 

beersydoesit

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What yeasts and what steeping grains? I am just curious. Morris and Lazy surely are surely correct about the fermentation temp
 

carnevoodoo

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Ah, good catch. I assumed he was talking about pitching temps with numbers that high.

morris: each yeast strain has a specific recommended temperature range that you'll want to keep your beer within while it's fermenting. You should be able to find that info on the packet/vial, or on the yeast producers website.
Yeah. But even pitching at 80 and then getting it down to proper temps is going to stress the heck out of the yeast. If he's using kits (or even if he isn't) those styles all use a fairly neutral yeast, so I'm assuming something like Munton's, S-05, or WLP001. All should be below 70 for best results.
 

Grinder12000

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Too hot and probably too young. Beer needs a good 3 months before it really starts to take on it's own character.

Don't be afraid of extract twang, it's a default excuse for NORMALLY bad technique OR very very old extract which is hard to find these days if you buy from almost ANY LHBS.

80 is WAY too high and 70 is something I'll get to DURING fermentation if I want a certain style.

I think the biggest mistake a new brewer makes is pitching too early which equals too warm.
 
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