The stupidest comment on your beer

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chefchris

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He knew me on a first name basis (not for good reasons), lol. I was always in trouble as a teen lol.
Man, this is blowing my mind right now. I called my mom and told her. I tell you, Charles was a great man. If the world was filled with more people like him it'd be a lot nicer place. I do miss him.

While we're at it, you don't know any Holland's by chance do you?
 

Bodie

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While we're at it, you don't know any Holland's by chance do you?
I'm a Holland. My family is from the Eupora area.
 

Ketchepillar

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Him: "hmmm this beer is thicker than I like" *turns to sink and pours a bunch of water in the beer.
Me: "Gah!"

Brother in-law all the time no matter what beer I make: should be more smooth. I like smooth!

I don't understand BMC drinkers and their concept of "smooth". To me, overcarbonated pale lagers are anything but smooth.
 

Reno_eNVy

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I don't understand BMC drinkers and their concept of "smooth". To me, overcarbonated pale lagers are anything but smooth.
Hooray! Back on topic!

But yeah, I think their idea of "smooth" is like their idea of "drinkability."

They're so adorable sometimes ^_^
 

Kauai_Kahuna

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I tend to bring two 5gal kegs to parties, and I try to bring beers that match the people. But lately I have been bringing more specialty beers and the kegs float. I have noticed in the last three years I got tired of talking about how I made the beer to everyone that wants to know so I instead of a basic label I now print out the recipe, brewing details, etc and put them on top of the picnic tap.
Also inside is the meads, ciders, and deadly stuff that I talk about with the people who really know their drinks.

Usually I get, "You made this?"
 

s3n8

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Yesterday I got several...

On the very smooth, drinkable Fat Tire clone...

"Wow, this has a lot of flavor"

On the Belgian Blonde...

"This tastes bitey"

On the Vanilla Bourbon Porter...

"This tastes like snuff juice, like that Guiness stuff."

And the best anyone could muster...

"Its not bad"
 

svengoat

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Sorta off topic:

Yesterday I brought over a 3 month in the bottle Rougeon wine to my GF's house.. I've received plenty of good reviews from wine snobs but GF's mom busts out with..
"it tastes like beer" and she set it down.. BTW she's drinking 7 dollar a gallon swill at the time..:mad:

I thought I opened the wrong bottle as I did have a stout there also..
 

2-0turbo

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I am new to homebrewing, so I have only sprung one batch on friends and family. The most repeated comment I get is:

"It's a-c-t-u-a-l-l-y pretty good!" Thank goodness for me they had low expectations. : )
 

Austinhomebrew

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The one I hate the most is "Not Bad". My reply is usually "Of course it is not bad. If it was bad I wouldn't have served it to you."

To me it says, "I was expecting it to be bad, but I am suprised that it isn't"

I also don't like it when people ask questions before they even taste it. "Is this all-grain or extract?" or "What style of beer is it?"

These are questions posed to point out what you did wrong. They want to know before they drink it so they taste the imperfections. They need to know so that they don't say they can taste "Extract twang" on an all-grain batch.

I just simply tell them it is beer and they need to drink it.

Don't be that guy. Judge a beer that is offered to you on it's own merits. Beers do not have to fit into BJCP beer styles to be good.



There are a lot of people that know that they are suppose to hate Budweiser American Ale before they even taste it. It is an ok beer, I wouldn't buy it again.

I took some to work to stop some employees from being beer snobs.
I poured some into glasses and wrote up what I thought would be the recipe on a piece of paper. I had some employees try the beer and I showed them the recipe on the paper. I asked them if they think I should change anything or do they like it the way it is.

All of them said they liked the beer. A few had some minor suggestions. When I let them know that what they were drinking was Budweiser American Ale, some of them just walked away in disgust but one guy said he wishes he would have been told before he tasted it because he is not supposed to like the beer.

The experiment chipped away a little of the snobbery.

The way I see it is this: there are 2 kinds of beer. One you drink for flavor and one you drink to get drunk that has little flavor. There is nothing wrong with either. BMC has its place. No need to bash it. If someone says his favorite beer is Bud Lite you know he just drinks beer to get drunk and doesn't drink for flavor. Thats ok.

Forrest
 

the bunnay

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I took some to work to stop some employees from being beer snobs.
I poured some into glasses and wrote up what I thought would be the recipe on a piece of paper. I had some employees try the beer and I showed them the recipe on the paper. I asked them if they think I should change anything or do they like it the way it is.

All of them said they liked the beer. A few had some minor suggestions. When I let them know that what they were drinking was Budweiser American Ale, some of them just walked away in disgust but one guy said he wishes he would have been told before he tasted it because he is not supposed to like the beer.

The experiment chipped away a little of the snobbery.
Brilliant.

I am actually a fan of trying everything at least once. The only way to really figure out what you like is to taste a lot of things and figure out what things you don't like. Everyone's taste preferences are different. Beer appreciation is good, beer snobbery just makes everyone look bad.
 

Revvy

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The one I hate the most is "Not Bad". My reply is usually "Of course it is not bad. If it was bad I wouldn't have served it to you."

To me it says, "I was expecting it to be bad, but I am suprised that it isn't"

I also don't like it when people ask questions before they even taste it. "Is this all-grain or extract?" or "What style of beer is it?"

These are questions posed to point out what you did wrong. They want to know before they drink it so they taste the imperfections. They need to know so that they don't say they can taste "Extract twang" on an all-grain batch.

I just simply tell them it is beer and they need to drink it.

Don't be that guy. Judge a beer that is offered to you on it's own merits. Beers do not have to fit into BJCP beer styles to be good.



There are a lot of people that know that they are suppose to hate Budweiser American Ale before they even taste it. It is an ok beer, I wouldn't buy it again.

I took some to work to stop some employees from being beer snobs.
I poured some into glasses and wrote up what I thought would be the recipe on a piece of paper. I had some employees try the beer and I showed them the recipe on the paper. I asked them if they think I should change anything or do they like it the way it is.

All of them said they liked the beer. A few had some minor suggestions. When I let them know that what they were drinking was Budweiser American Ale, some of them just walked away in disgust but one guy said he wishes he would have been told before he tasted it because he is not supposed to like the beer.

The experiment chipped away a little of the snobbery.

The way I see it is this: there are 2 kinds of beer. One you drink for flavor and one you drink to get drink that has little flavor. There is nothing wrong with either. BMC has its place. No need to bash it. If someone says his favorite beer is Bud Lite you know he just drinks beer to get drunk and doesn't drink for flavor. Thats ok.

Forrest
Too cool Forrest, too cool!!!

:mug:
 

Matt Up North

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The one I hate the most is "Not Bad". My reply is usually "Of course it is not bad. If it was bad I wouldn't have served it to you."

To me it says, "I was expecting it to be bad, but I am suprised that it isn't"

I also don't like it when people ask questions before they even taste it. "Is this all-grain or extract?" or "What style of beer is it?"

These are questions posed to point out what you did wrong. They want to know before they drink it so they taste the imperfections. They need to know so that they don't say they can taste "Extract twang" on an all-grain batch.

I just simply tell them it is beer and they need to drink it.

Don't be that guy. Judge a beer that is offered to you on it's own merits. Beers do not have to fit into BJCP beer styles to be good.



There are a lot of people that know that they are suppose to hate Budweiser American Ale before they even taste it. It is an ok beer, I wouldn't buy it again.

I took some to work to stop some employees from being beer snobs.
I poured some into glasses and wrote up what I thought would be the recipe on a piece of paper. I had some employees try the beer and I showed them the recipe on the paper. I asked them if they think I should change anything or do they like it the way it is.

All of them said they liked the beer. A few had some minor suggestions. When I let them know that what they were drinking was Budweiser American Ale, some of them just walked away in disgust but one guy said he wishes he would have been told before he tasted it because he is not supposed to like the beer.

The experiment chipped away a little of the snobbery.

The way I see it is this: there are 2 kinds of beer. One you drink for flavor and one you drink to get drink that has little flavor. There is nothing wrong with either. BMC has its place. No need to bash it. If someone says his favorite beer is Bud Lite you know he just drinks beer to get drunk and doesn't drink for flavor. Thats ok.

Forrest
You sir are my long lost twin. I HATE it when someone says, "Not Bad." Couldn't you say something more productive like, "This is good and I wasn't expecting to enjoy it." Or just tell me that it is nasty. I am not going to serve something that I think tastes like monkey butt. Now, if I have a lambic and you don't know it is going to be sour, then by god I will explain to you the characteristics, let you know that I am not going to give you a glass, but you can taste. If you like it, we will go from there.

I did that experiment with some Two Buck Chuck at a wine party. I put it into a $120 bottle of wine bottle and told everyone that it was a very expensive bottle, that I only wanted the people that really enjoy wine to try it and if you don't think you are snobby enough then don't drink it. Every one of the people were so freaking high up that they tasted things in it that I didn't even know existed. Here they were waxing poetic under the assumption that the wine was expensive and meanwhile I just sat back and let them have a good time. They even clapped me on the back and thanked me for bringing such a rare and spectacular treat.
 

Austinhomebrew

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Grape expectations
What wine can tell us about the nature of reality
By Jonah Lehrer
February 24, 2008

SCIENTISTS AT CALTECH and Stanford recently published the results of a peculiar wine tasting. They provided people with cabernet sauvignons at various price points, with bottles ranging from $5 to $90. Although the tasters were told that all the wines were different, the scientists were in fact presenting the same wines at different prices.

The subjects consistently reported that the more expensive wines tasted better, even when they were actually identical to cheaper wines.

The experiment was even more unusual because it was conducted inside a scanner - the drinks were sipped via a network of plastic tubes - that allowed the scientists to see how the subjects' brains responded to each wine. When subjects were told they were getting a more expensive wine, they observed more activity in a part of the brain known to be involved in our experience of pleasure.

What they saw was the power of expectations. People expect expensive wines to taste better, and then their brains literally make it so. Wine lovers shouldn't feel singled out: Antonio Rangel, the Caltech neuroeconomist who led the study, insists that he could have used a variety of items to get similar results, from bottled water to modern art.

Expectations have long been a topic of psychological research, and it's well known that they affect how we react to events, or how we respond to medication. But in recent years, scientists have been intensively studying how expectations shape our direct experience of the world, what we taste, feel, and hear. The findings have been surprising - did you know that generic drugs can be less effective merely because they cost less? - and it's now becoming clear just how pervasive the effects of expectation are.

The human brain, research suggests, isn't built for objectivity. The brain doesn't passively take in perceptions. Rather, brain regions involved in developing expectations can systematically alter the activity of areas involved in sensation. The cortex is "cooking the books," adjusting its own inputs depending on what it expects.

Although much of this research has been done by scientists interested in marketing and consumer decisions, the work has broad implications. People assume that they perceive reality as it is, that our senses accurately record the outside world. Yet the science suggests that, in important ways, people experience reality not as it is, but as they expect it to be.
 

Austinhomebrew

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Simply put, if something is cheap you look for flaws. If it is expensive, you look for positive things that justify you spending that much money.

If any of you start a brewery, being a slave to cheap six packs only devalues your product no matter how good it is.

If you make $5 22oz bombers the beer is twice as expensive so it will taste considerably better, even if it is the same exact beer.

Work smarter not harder.

Forrest
 

the bunnay

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Grape expectations
What wine can tell us about the nature of reality
By Jonah Lehrer
February 24, 2008

SCIENTISTS AT CALTECH and Stanford recently published the results of a peculiar wine tasting. They provided people with cabernet sauvignons at various price points, with bottles ranging from $5 to $90. Although the tasters were told that all the wines were different, the scientists were in fact presenting the same wines at different prices.

The subjects consistently reported that the more expensive wines tasted better, even when they were actually identical to cheaper wines.

The experiment was even more unusual because it was conducted inside a scanner - the drinks were sipped via a network of plastic tubes - that allowed the scientists to see how the subjects' brains responded to each wine. When subjects were told they were getting a more expensive wine, they observed more activity in a part of the brain known to be involved in our experience of pleasure.

What they saw was the power of expectations. People expect expensive wines to taste better, and then their brains literally make it so. Wine lovers shouldn't feel singled out: Antonio Rangel, the Caltech neuroeconomist who led the study, insists that he could have used a variety of items to get similar results, from bottled water to modern art.

Expectations have long been a topic of psychological research, and it's well known that they affect how we react to events, or how we respond to medication. But in recent years, scientists have been intensively studying how expectations shape our direct experience of the world, what we taste, feel, and hear. The findings have been surprising - did you know that generic drugs can be less effective merely because they cost less? - and it's now becoming clear just how pervasive the effects of expectation are.

The human brain, research suggests, isn't built for objectivity. The brain doesn't passively take in perceptions. Rather, brain regions involved in developing expectations can systematically alter the activity of areas involved in sensation. The cortex is "cooking the books," adjusting its own inputs depending on what it expects.

Although much of this research has been done by scientists interested in marketing and consumer decisions, the work has broad implications. People assume that they perceive reality as it is, that our senses accurately record the outside world. Yet the science suggests that, in important ways, people experience reality not as it is, but as they expect it to be.
This very closely mirrors Dan Ariely's work on placebos. If it costs more it works better. Weird wild stuff.

[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bHBwHVbUwig]YouTube - Dan Ariely - Why Do Placebos Work?[/ame]
 

MBasile

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Simply put, if something is cheap you look for flaws. If it is expensive, you look for positive things that justify you spending that much money.

If any of you start a brewery, being a slave to cheap six packs only devalues your product no matter how good it is.

If you make $5 22oz bombers the beer is twice as expensive so it will taste considerably better, even if it is the same exact beer.

Work smarter not harder.

Forrest
Thats even something they teach you in intro to business classes, people assume more expensive products are better.
 
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My comment this weekend.
Cousin - Did you bring any of your home made stuff?
Me - No
Cousin - Good

This is the guy that told me last weekend that my Black pepper wit was good, if I wouldn't have put the pepper in it.
I don't get offended. He drink Busch light religiously and that what his taste buds expect from a beer.

I can't wait until next weekend when I take a couple bombers to the Brewer at Smokey Mountain Brewery. Get some (hopefully) honest feedback from a pro. :) Needs to get my Fat Tire on tap to carb up in time.
 

Brew Runner

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I brought some Pacifico to a friend's on Saturday thinking it was benign enough for BMC drinkers, yet something I would enjoy. Believe it or not, they turned their noses up at it. :confused: The situation became a little more clear when I put it in his fridge filled with Budweiser, Bud Light, and Bud Lime. I think I saw some Miller Chill also. Oh well, I got to drink the Pacifico at least. :)

Said friend also asked a few weeks ago if I had any homebrew. I do have homebrew, but not intentions of sharing anything but small quantities with that circle. They may genuinely want to try it, but I know they won't like it.
 

Roman Brewer

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About an IPA I made and brought to my company picnic to share:

Me: "You want to try one?"
Boss: "Sure. What's it taste like? Is it good?"
Me: "Yeah, it's great." (pour in picnic cup, hand to boss)
Boss: "Ugh, that's awful." (Pours the beer out on the grass)

Yeah.

DB

Roman
 

jamesnsw

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My coworker is convinced that either hops or ales make him sleepy, and likely wouldn't take more than a couple sips of my homebrew. Only will drink BMC. Any backing to this idea?
 

ODP

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ha ha- As a live sound engineer, this thread reminds me of how non-industry types try to describe sound.

"it sounds rubbery"

or

"it sounds plastic-y"

always crack me up
 

Schlenkerla

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About an IPA I made and brought to my company picnic to share:

Me: "You want to try one?"
Boss: "Sure. What's it taste like? Is it good?"
Me: "Yeah, it's great." (pour in picnic cup, hand to boss)
Boss: "Ugh, that's awful." (Pours the beer out on the grass)

Yeah.

DB

Roman
I don't bother sharing anything with non homebrewers/ beer officiandos thats non-bmc like, its a waste IMO.

SWMBO's friend thinks she's a beer snob, but cringes at anything that has any hop bitterness. I gave her one of dudes pub ale, I think it was 18 IBU. She complained it was too bitter. I told her that I was revoking her self-proclaimed beer snobb status. I suggested she go back to Rum & Coke.

Its funny how some people hate any percieved bitterness but can be AOK with the funk in an authentic german hefeweizen. That's her...

I think most people will be ok with a slight bitterness but hate the hefe character. I have heard the dirty socks comment from BMC'rs before with a perfect tasting hefe.
 

MeatyPortion

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About an IPA I made and brought to my company picnic to share:

Me: "You want to try one?"
Boss: "Sure. What's it taste like? Is it good?"
Me: "Yeah, it's great." (pour in picnic cup, hand to boss)
Boss: "Ugh, that's awful." (Pours the beer out on the grass)

Yeah.

DB

Roman
Wow, he would have fired me after the fire department removed my fist from his mouth.
 

TXCrash

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On Saturday I brewed up a batch of Eds Haus ale. Decided to share some of the spent grains with the "adopted ducks" who hang out by my neighbors house (lots of bread...) every summer.

Him: Won't that get the ducks drunk?
Me: Nope - not fermented yet
Him (as sparrows pick at grains): One of them comes flying all drunk like into the house I'm blaming you


*sigh
 

dataz722

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My coworker is convinced that either hops or ales make him sleepy, and likely wouldn't take more than a couple sips of my homebrew. Only will drink BMC. Any backing to this idea?
There is some validity to that actually. Most homebrews have more alcohol and I have had them make me tired before. Some nights if im really tired I have to drink BMC or it will put me to sleep.
 

MeatyPortion

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Once in awhile I'll drink Blatz, Schlitz (the beer that made Milwaukee famous lol) or PBR. One of my buddies does the same thing but we both mostly like other beers e.g. Guinness, Dogfish Head's IPAs, New Glarus ales, and some Belgian sours. He gave me a hand with one of my brew days last year and he and his girlfriend really like the Warbler Pale Ale I brewed. Having them taste different beers/wines/whiskys/etc is good since they won't play around: they'll tell you if they like it or hate it immediately.
 

Schlenkerla

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About an IPA I made and brought to my company picnic to share:

Me: "You want to try one?"
Boss: "Sure. What's it taste like? Is it good?"
Me: "Yeah, it's great." (pour in picnic cup, hand to boss)
Boss: "Ugh, that's awful." (Pours the beer out on the grass)

Yeah.

DB

Roman
Wow, he would have fired me after the fire department removed my fist from his mouth.
No $hit, I was thinking what a F'ng Dyck! :mad:
 

Boerderij_Kabouter

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I get a lot of the "is this beer or ale?" questions, but mostly people are really happy to try it. I have also gotten the "Man this doesn't taste like the crap I brewed." thing a couple times. Those people are the most impressed by good beer brewed at home because they thought Mr. Beer or whatever they brewed was the end of the line.
 
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