The Saison "stall"?

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brownni5

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Be it Wyeast 3724 or WLP 565 or some other lab's variant of the yeast from the world's best-known Saison producer, home brewers are always warned of a stall at 1.030 or so. I've brewed with 3724 a few times now and have not witnessed it. 9 days ago, I brewed a Saison, used a fresh smack pack for a healthy pitch (2.5 gal), pitched in the upper 60's, ramped up to 80 somewhat gradually, and it's now at 1.014 (with temp correction on my hydrometer), or about 70%AA - from past experience with this yeast, I expect it to dry out nicely (the only reason I took a gravity sample was to see if I could catch it stalled). I suppose it's possible this one "stalled" at 1.014, but I bet when I package in a couple weeks, it's pretty low.

My question is, for those who see a stall, what are you doing? Keep in mind I'm not complaining that I don't see it, I just wonder where this idea comes from. No, it's not completely done in 4 days, but as a homebrewer, I don't need it to be. Are other Saison brewers just that impatient? Does 3711 reach terminal gravity that quickly (I've never brewed with it, and rarely take a gravity sample before 7days).
 

DBhomebrew

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Drew Beechum...

"Many brewers fear the dreaded “saison stall” seen with these strains. Your fermentation goes gangbusters for a day or two, and then all activity stops for two to three weeks. I’ve done experiments that give credence to these strains’ preference for open fermentation. Give your yeast room to breathe. Dupont uses large squarish fermentors with plenty of air space. For homebrewers, just slap aluminum foil over your fermentor instead of an airlock during primary fermentation. Once the active fermentation dies down, safeguard your beer with an airlock."

 
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brownni5

brownni5

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Drew Beechum...

"Many brewers fear the dreaded “saison stall” seen with these strains. Your fermentation goes gangbusters for a day or two, and then all activity stops for two to three weeks. I’ve done experiments that give credence to these strains’ preference for open fermentation. Give your yeast room to breathe. Dupont uses large squarish fermentors with plenty of air space. For homebrewers, just slap aluminum foil over your fermentor instead of an airlock during primary fermentation. Once the active fermentation dies down, safeguard your beer with an airlock."

Yup, I've read that. I've also found that to not be true - I always ferment with an airlock. FWIW, Brulosophy found the same thing - no difference with or without airlock.

Which brings me back to my original question - has anyone experienced the stall?
 

day_trippr

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Check the "Similar Threads" at the bottom, here. Should be an info-rich opportunity :)

Cheers!
 

Twinkeelfool

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Yes, with 3724. It doesnt bother me at all, I know about it and plan for it. It’s a great yeast, stall or no stall. I also like 3726, which I find has similar flavour characteristics but is done within 10 days. It’s a bit like lagers, I plan them out so I’m not waiting impatiently for it to finish. It’s no big deal for me
 

CascadesBrewer

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Which brings me back to my original question - has anyone experienced the stall?
I did. Several years ago I made a Saison with one of the Dupont yeasts (don't recall if White Labs or Wyeast...I believe the Saison was a kit from Northern Brewer). At the time I did not have fermentation temp control, and I don't recall what temp I was fermenting at or if I made a starter (I probably did). The beer stalled at around 1.020 as I recall. I moved it to an upstairs closet, roused the yeast now and then and it chugged along for a few more weeks and then finished out.

That said, I just fermented two batches using WLP565 and both were ready to keg at 2 weeks. For these ones I pitched at 68F, just covered with foil, let the beer rise in my chamber, then held the temp at 78F until ready to package.

So my fermentation schedule between these two beers was quite different making it hard to point out what may have impacted the fermentation. I see enough people post about the Dupont strain stalling for weeks, so I am pretty sure it happens fairly often.
 
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I love Saison and I love 3724, however I never use it without 3711. This combination IME has never stalled. I used to co-pitch on brew day, but now I like to add the 3711 after the kräusen has fallen.
 

Snuffy

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I love Saison and I love 3724, however I never use it without 3711. This combination IME has never stalled. I used to co-pitch on brew day, but now I like to add the 3711 after the kräusen has fallen.
So you mix the qualities of both Belgian and French styles. Sounds interesting if it didn't cost 20 bucks for yeast. Are you brewing larger than 5-gal batches?
 

monkeymath

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I feel like this is one of these topics that are perpetually discussed on this forum, ad nauseam.

Let the yeast stall or not stall - the only thing that never stalls is the discussion about the Saison stall on homebrewtalk.
 
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