American IPA The New West Coast IPA

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Dgallo

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This is first batch for this style, I did 2row with munich at about 9% and a little bit of carapils. Bittered with chinook then citra and cascade the rest of the way, no dry hops. It's pretty good but I think I'll up the citra on the next batch.
View attachment 806999
Looks great. I think you should dryhop it next time and just use biofine to clear it. I really think that will go a long way
 

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This is first batch for this style, I did 2row with munich at about 9% and a little bit of carapils. Bittered with chinook then citra and cascade the rest of the way, no dry hops. It's pretty good but I think I'll up the citra on the next batch.
View attachment 806999
Munich kicks butt in this style.
 

Dgallo

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Thanks. Maybe I'll leave my hot side additions alone a dry hop with citra and something or another.
Sounds like a plan. So I got some inside scoop from fiden’s who bases their west coast ipas from New Park and Steve told me they bitter to 30-40 ibus. Whirlpool at about 1lb/bbl and then dryhop at 3 lbs/bbl. They then use biofine at about 1.5-2x the recommended amount
 

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Sounds like a plan. So I got some inside scoop from fiden’s who bases their west coast ipas from New Park and Steve told me they bitter to 30-40 ibus. Whirlpool at about 1lb/bbl and then dryhop at 3 lbs/bbl. They then use biofine at about 1.5-2x the recommended amount
After using Biofine at 1oz per 5 gal, I realized I was dosing way too high as well. Morebeer has it anywhere between 1/10oz to 1oz per 5. It works so friggin good for my beer, I've continued with the 1oz per 5 gal.
 
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Dgallo

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After using Biofine at 1oz per 5 gal, I realized I was dosing way too high as well. Morebeer has it anywhere between 1/10oz to 1oz per 5. It works so friggin good for my beer, I've continued with the 10z per 5 gal.
I use it at 7.5-10 ml per 5.5-6 gallons in the fermenter and it’s crystal clear in about 3-5 days
 

Dgallo

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Sounds like a great product, I'll have to get me some. Is there a temp ppl are whirlpooling at for this style? I usually go for 170f
I’m right around there. 10% or lower alphaI’m 175*f. 10-15% I drop to 165-*f. Above 15% I drop to 155-160*f. I have no true science to back of the efficacy of this but it makes logical sense and it has worked lol
 
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Dgallo

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I can't say I've had this style from any of the pros but I like my first run of it and plan to fine tune it. In the meantime I'll have to try to get my hands on some fidens or similar.
Idk where you’re located, but if you have some solid local or semi locals I’d be down to trade fiden’s for it
 
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ihavenonickname

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This is first batch for this style, I did 2row with munich at about 9% and a little bit of carapils. Bittered with chinook then citra and cascade the rest of the way, no dry hops. It's pretty good but I think I'll up the citra on the next batch.
View attachment 806999
I'll have to try Pilsner malt as the base. This is my WC-ish ipa recipe for Citra/Mosaic, which has become a staple on my tap list. 1 pack US05. I used to use Vienna instead of Munich, and the color was nearly identical to yours. I'll have to take out the Munich, but damn does it give the beer that extra little umph!View attachment 806921
Both those beers sound, and look great! Up until the last year or so all my West Coast IPAs had some Munich. It may not be everyone’s preference, but you gotta try it without! I guess that’s one of the points of this thread… to get the balance with no Munich (and no crystal) the beer should also should go along with less early addition bitterness, lower final gravity, and a whopping DryHop!
 
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tracer bullet

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When do you guys add the Biofine? I figured it belonged after fermentation, and I didn't want to open the carboy and expose it to air. I used to use it and know it works but that was prior to changing my methods to avoid O2 exposure (and my beer flavors last far longer now as a result).

I also add some Munich to my Pale Ale base, and a little Caramel 40 as well. I typically play around with Cascade and Centennial in various ratios, amounts and times of addition. Never unhappy with the result. My last batch on tap now was about 2/3 Centennial, 1/3 Cascade, with whirpool and dry additions. With the 1272 American II yeast I truly get "tangerine" from it and am really enjoying it right now.
 

wepeeler

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When do you guys add the Biofine? I figured it belonged after fermentation, and I didn't want to open the carboy and expose it to air. I used to use it and know it works but that was prior to changing my methods to avoid O2 exposure (and my beer flavors last far longer now as a result).

I also add some Munich to my Pale Ale base, and a little Caramel 40 as well. I typically play around with Cascade and Centennial in various ratios, amounts and times of addition. Never unhappy with the result. My last batch on tap now was about 2/3 Centennial, 1/3 Cascade, with whirpool and dry additions. With the 1272 American II yeast I truly get "tangerine" from it and am really enjoying it right now.
I use it in the serving keg, others use it in the fermenter.
 

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Dgallo

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When do you guys add the Biofine? I figured it belonged after fermentation, and I didn't want to open the carboy and expose it to air. I used to use it and know it works but that was prior to changing my methods to avoid O2 exposure (and my beer flavors last far longer now as a result).

I also add some Munich to my Pale Ale base, and a little Caramel 40 as well. I typically play around with Cascade and Centennial in various ratios, amounts and times of addition. Never unhappy with the result. My last batch on tap now was about 2/3 Centennial, 1/3 Cascade, with whirpool and dry additions. With the 1272 American II yeast I truly get "tangerine" from it and am really enjoying it right now.
Biofine is intended to be used in cold beer where it is mixed in well. Pro breweries typically use it in line, in a hop back or similar vessel while they are transferring from fermenter to brite tank so that it mixes well. The way I found works the best at the Homebrew level is to use it in a secondary fermenter or keg with close transfer capabilities.


Use the typical process of liquid purging the secondary vessel. when purged, measure out the biofine in a syringe. Then you're going to start unscrewing the pressure relief valve. When your close to unscrewing it all the way, connect the co2 line to your gas bulkhead with low psi and then completely unscrew the prv. Then use the syringe to push the biofine into the keg/fv. Once in, let the gas run for a 10 second to prevent as much o2 from entering as possible. Then screw the prv back in.

After that you’ll close transfer as normal and rock the keg/secondary back and forth a few times to makes sure it’s completely mixed in. After that crash it and wait 3-5 days. After that you’ll be left with crystal clear beer.
846290C7-8A86-465C-BA85-962808ED079F.jpeg
E8D6C708-3ED9-420D-A41B-9030A51AE9D7.jpeg
 
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stickyfinger

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Biofine is intended to be used in cold beer where it is mixed in well. Pro breweries typically use it in line, in a hop back or similar vessel while they are transferring from fermenter to brite tank so that it mixes well. The way I found works the best at the Homebrew level is to use it in a secondary fermenter or keg with close transfer capabilities.


Use the typical process of liquid purging the secondary vessel. when purged, measure out the biofine in a syringe. Then you're going to start unscrewing the pressure relief valve. When your close to unscrewing it all the way, connect the co2 line to your gas bulkhead with low psi and then completely unscrew the prv. Then use the syringe to push the biofine into the keg/fv. Once in, let the gas run for a 10 second to prevent as much o2 from entering as possible. Then screw the prv back in.

After that you’ll close transfer as normal and rock the keg/secondary back and forth a few times to makes sure it’s completely mixed in. After that crash it and wait 3-5 days. After that you’ll be left with crystal clear beer. View attachment 807031 View attachment 807032
Do you just serve off of the top of the stuff that falls out with the Biofine?
 

Dgallo

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Do you just serve off of the top of the stuff that falls out with the Biofine?
If you put it in your serving keg and wait that time, your first 2 pints will be atrociously murky but it will all come out and you’ll be serving clear beer by 3rd or 4th pint.

I personally have been using a secondary as I can purge and close transfer well, so I’ll rack off of it using the floating dip tube to a serving keg
 

wepeeler

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Do you just serve off of the top of the stuff that falls out with the Biofine?
I add to keg when racking. I usually wait 24-48 hours after the keg has reached 38F or so and pour out about 2 pints. Ultra murky, like @Dgallo said. It gets clearer every day. For lighter beers, I'm usually clear by day 5ish. Only gets clearer from there. Brilliantly clear in a week, and even brighter as the keg conditions. Wonderful stuff.
 

Ulisses4677

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Biofine is intended to be used in cold beer where it is mixed in well. Pro breweries typically use it in line, in a hop back or similar vessel while they are transferring from fermenter to brite tank so that it mixes well. The way I found works the best at the Homebrew level is to use it in a secondary fermenter or keg with close transfer capabilities.


Use the typical process of liquid purging the secondary vessel. when purged, measure out the biofine in a syringe. Then you're going to start unscrewing the pressure relief valve. When your close to unscrewing it all the way, connect the co2 line to your gas bulkhead with low psi and then completely unscrew the prv. Then use the syringe to push the biofine into the keg/fv. Once in, let the gas run for a 10 second to prevent as much o2 from entering as possible. Then screw the prv back in.

After that you’ll close transfer as normal and rock the keg/secondary back and forth a few times to makes sure it’s completely mixed in. After that crash it and wait 3-5 days. After that you’ll be left with crystal clear beer. View attachment 807031 View attachment 807032
Looks amazing. What hops did you use?
 

stickyfinger

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If you use a non-haze-positive yeast like chico in a hoppy beer and then fine it does the hop flavor come across as less than in a hazy ipa?
 

wepeeler

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I got think I got this on Amazon for 44.99 or something. Def worth it if you plan on making a lot of clear beer
I got mine from morebeer for $44.99. I was showing him the data sheet, as he asked what temps to use it at, and I wasn't 100% sure. I put it straight into the keg.
 

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If you use a non-haze-positive yeast like chico in a hoppy beer and then fine it does the hop flavor come across as less than in a hazy ipa?
In my experience if you dont use enough hotside and depending on the fg you get a sweet ipa without balls
 

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This is a great thread. Glad to read posts from brewers discussing this style of beer. I’m going to be snarky, sorry, but IPA can be clear and still have amazing hop bitterness, flavor and aroma!
 

beervoid

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This is a great thread. Glad to read posts from brewers discussing this style of beer. I’m going to be snarky, sorry, but IPA can be clear and still have amazing hop bitterness, flavor and aroma!
Maybe I should elaborate on my above comment, what I meant to say is if you are following a hazy style ipa recipe and using chico yeast, you def miss the extra kettle additions which are necessary for a clear/bitter beer
 

Dgallo

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Maybe I should elaborate on my above comment, what I meant to say is if you are following a hazy style ipa recipe and using chico yeast, you def miss the extra kettle additions which are necessary for a clear/bitter beer
I will say that most us based breweries doing this style are truly just hitting their target ibus from their bittering addition and then waiting until whirlpool again to hop it again. That’s not to say I don’t disagree with you as I will use atleast 2 oz in boil to set that “foundation” for the flavor profile to build off
 

beervoid

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I will say that most us based breweries doing this style are truly just hitting their target ibus from their bittering addition and then waiting until whirlpool again to hop it again. That’s not to say I don’t disagree with you as I will use atleast 2 oz in boil to set that “foundation” for the flavor profile to build off
Ah I count whirlpool as kettle additions but yes shifting towards later additions.
I've read contrary experiences though, some prefer late additions vs whirlpool, I think it's very pallet specific. Boil seems to bring other flavors to the table, probably cause of thiol extraction. I also read people getting less IBU from late vs whirlpool so it all seems a bit black magic to me.
 
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ihavenonickname

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Regarding biofine, are there any issues with it sitting in the serving keg while getting purged during fermentation?
I think that’s a great idea. My general SOP is to use fermentation co2 to purge a dry hopping Kegmenter and a serving keg. Just pre loading the serving keg with biofine sounds great. I would imagine the biofine has some advantages over gelatin for this purpose.
 

Jesse Runowski

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Brewed this exact recipe a month ago, turned out fantastic! Everyone loves it. Been making hazies for awhile, it was nice to be able to keep it simple on brew day.

Anyone else thinking about different hop varieties that would play nice with this style? I wouldn't mind some classic C hop combos. Maybe Cascade / Centennial with a little Citra?

Used 15ml of Biofine, looks good but not clear. Might try 20ml next time.

IMG_2555.jpg
 
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