Tettnanger Lager

Homebrew Talk - Beer, Wine, Mead, & Cider Brewing Discussion Forum

Help Support Homebrew Talk:

larrybrewer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2008
Messages
329
Reaction score
9
Location
Portland, OR
GRAINS:
9 lb German Pilsner

MASH:
Hold at 152F for 60 minutes.

HOPS:
Tettnanger 1.5oz for 60 min
Tettnanger 0.5oz for 10 min

Just curious what others think about this recipe. I got some tettnanger hops pellets and wanted to try them out to see the difference between hallertau, holding grains, yeast, and mash constant.

PROST!!
 
Joined
Oct 20, 2005
Messages
7,732
Reaction score
75
Location
Nanaimo, BC
Sounds like a SMaSH. I like tett. Solid noble hop. Hard to explain but a bit "spicier" than Saaz.

Have you already done this recipe with Haller?

I bought 5lbs of tett last year for 30 bucks, just before my wholesaler had to raise his pricing. So I have been using tett a lot more than I used to.
 

944play

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2008
Messages
2,725
Reaction score
50
Location
Portland
Sounds like a SMaSH. I like tett.
I also like Tett. I made a Munich/Tett SMaSH lager that I liked so much I'm doing it again!

If you're going for a German Pilsner like Bitburger, you want that sucker DRY. Consider a rest around 140F, then step/infuse/decoct up to alpha rest. Big ol' starter, aeration, yeast nutrient, blah blah blah.
 

Cpt_Kirks

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2008
Messages
3,704
Reaction score
60
Location
Lakeland TN
I also like Tett. I made a Munich/Tett SMaSH lager that I liked so much I'm doing it again!

If you're going for a German Pilsner like Bitburger, you want that sucker DRY. Consider a rest around 140F, then step/infuse/decoct up to alpha rest. Big ol' starter, aeration, yeast nutrient, blah blah blah.
My next planned brew is almost identical to this one.

When I saw 152, I thought 145 would be better, but working up from 140 sounds the best.

I just got some Tett, and am thinking about using it in combination with Saaz on this brew.

The Saaz I got was plugs, all I have ever used is pellets, so this will be interesting.
 
OP
larrybrewer

larrybrewer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2008
Messages
329
Reaction score
9
Location
Portland, OR
My next planned brew is almost identical to this one.

When I saw 152, I thought 145 would be better, but working up from 140 sounds the best.
Cool, glad this has been done/attempted before.

Thanks for catching the mash profile. I generally do a 3 step like this (straight from Palmer chapter 19):
125°F 20 minutes
140°F 30 minutes
158°F 30 minutes

Only with my most recent lager did I try the single mash step at 152F, and that was with Mt.Hood hops just for fun (instead of Hallertau which I love). I just reread the top of the thread and for the record I have not tried the single mash step with Hallertau. So many hops so little time, especially with lagers that take forever! I just rolled out a cascade pale ale that was drinkable in three weeks, ah but lagers are soooo smooth. Anyway, back to the thread:

The Mt.Hood version is about ready to be kegged, hopefully I can keg while I'm mashing or boiling the tettnanger batch this weekend. The OG was 1.044, and when I racked after three weeks the reading was 1.009. The FG is probably going to be ~1.008. We'll see how the flavor turns out.
 

AquaDementia

Member
Joined
Jan 6, 2009
Messages
24
Reaction score
0
Location
Minneapolis
''What's the advantage of the 90 min boil?''

90 minute boil reduces DMS associated with pilsner malt.
 

menschmaschine

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2007
Messages
3,259
Reaction score
51
Location
Delaware
I generally do a 3 step like this (straight from Palmer chapter 19):
125°F 20 minutes
140°F 30 minutes
158°F 30 minutes
I'd skip the 125°F rest. Palmer's info is a bit dated in regards to protein rests and current malt modification. What brand of Pilsener malt are you using? Unless it's specifically undermodified, you'll get better head retention by just using the 140°F and 158°F rests. Also, to gain a good attenuation, you might consider increasing the 140°F rest to 1 hour.
 

Ryan_PA

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 11, 2006
Messages
1,881
Reaction score
22
Location
Newtown Square
As previously stated, the 90 minute reduces DMS associated with pils. If you have not ever done a 90 minute, you have to remember to adjust your pre boil volume to compensate for the additional boil off.
 

giligson

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 1, 2008
Messages
758
Reaction score
4
Location
Vancouver Area - Canada
Is this German Tettnanger?
I want to include some in my next pilsner to try.
I understand that North American Tettnanger is identical to the Fuggles hop but owing to growing conditions the German plant tastes very different.
 
OP
larrybrewer

larrybrewer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2008
Messages
329
Reaction score
9
Location
Portland, OR
I'd skip the 125°F rest. Palmer's info is a bit dated in regards to protein rests and current malt modification. What brand of Pilsener malt are you using? Unless it's specifically undermodified, you'll get better head retention by just using the 140°F and 158°F rests. Also, to gain a good attenuation, you might consider increasing the 140°F rest to 1 hour.
I'm using Best Malz Pilsen, got a sack of it for $0.90/lb !!
 
OP
larrybrewer

larrybrewer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2008
Messages
329
Reaction score
9
Location
Portland, OR
Is this German Tettnanger?
I want to include some in my next pilsner to try.
I understand that North American Tettnanger is identical to the Fuggles hop but owing to growing conditions the German plant tastes very different.
Its domestic tettnanger pellets from Brewcraft. The packaging says this is a 'recently' introduced hop to the US. 4.8AA
 

menschmaschine

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2007
Messages
3,259
Reaction score
51
Location
Delaware
I'm using Best Malz Pilsen, got a sack of it for $0.90/lb !!
I also use BestMalz pilsen malt along with the lot-specific malt analysis. The last two years I bought it, the soluble nitrogen ratio was 42.X. So, it seems to be typical with BestMalz. This means that the 125°F rest would probably do more harm than good.
 
OP
larrybrewer

larrybrewer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2008
Messages
329
Reaction score
9
Location
Portland, OR
Well, I just racked it to the secondary for lagering.
OG 1.049
Gravity after racking: 1.010
Looks like I'm on target for 80%+ attenutation with German Lager Yeast - I love that stuff!
 

944play

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2008
Messages
2,725
Reaction score
50
Location
Portland
I liked the attenuation of German Lager, but it always gave me diacetyl. I'm trying Munich Lager now. It floccs out nicely but the beer is pretty heavy.
 

menschmaschine

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2007
Messages
3,259
Reaction score
51
Location
Delaware
Well, I just racked it to the secondary for lagering.
OG 1.049
Gravity after racking: 1.010
Looks like I'm on target for 80%+ attenutation with German Lager Yeast - I love that stuff!
Next time try Saflager W34/70. It's allegedly the same in a dry version. I was a big WLP830 user. I recently brewed a German Pils with W34/70 which is lagering right now. So far, taste and peformance is identical to WLP830.
 
OP
larrybrewer

larrybrewer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2008
Messages
329
Reaction score
9
Location
Portland, OR
Thanks for the tip on the dry yeast. This yeast was second generation (saved the yeast from one previous batch), went with a 3 pint starter, fired right up.

As for dialectal - I pull it out of the fridge for 2 days, then rack it, have not had issues with dialectal flavor at all.
 
Top