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bobcat1

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i am trying to figure out all these new terms....
i have heard lager all my life. But wasnt until i started brewing that i know it had to do with temp.

so what is the differnce in some of these terms? ale....stout....ipa ...porter...pilsner....malt....ect??????????????
 

GilaMinumBeer

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terms for dummies: idiot, knucklehead, dumbass, twit, meathead, a......

Oh, you mean beer terms?

Ale is the opposite of lager and refers to the yeast used for fermentation. The other words/acronyms are names of beer styles. Malt is processed barley. Necessary for the making of beer.
 
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kaconga

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i am trying to figure out all these new terms....
i have heard lager all my life. But wasnt until i started brewing that i know it had to do with temp.

so what is the differnce in some of these terms? ale....stout....ipa ...porter...pilsner....malt....ect??????????????
Ale- a broad classification of beer made using ale yeast strains.

Stout- a very dark beer brewed with a substantial amount of roasted barley. Stouts are ales.

IPA- India Pale Ale is a strong hoppy beer known primarily for its higher alcohol and bitterness. Note: IPA has come to be a moniker for any very hoppy beer, ie: Black IPA.

Porter- a dark style of beer brewed with large amounts of darker malts, though typically not a lot of roasted barley. Can be ale (brown porter) or lager (baltic porter).

Pilsner- a very light lager that originated in the town of pilsen. Many variants exist today, all are very light in color and lagers.

Malt- an ingredient in brewing beer. Malt is made by germinating grains until they are fully modified and then drying them. When fully modified the enzymes and starches become available for brewers to use in a mash. Note: crystal malts have undergone the enzymatic process already and have sugars instead of starches for the brewer to use. They don't need to be mashed.

Most all of these terms are explained in the HBT wiki that can be found in the full site online. Just look for the tab that says wiki to the right of forums. Hope that gets you started.
 

balrog

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Bobcat, as a noob myself I feel your confusion. I read a lot on here, on wikipedia, I generally do a monthly sacrifice of a virgin hard drive to the mighty and powerful Google, and then I will timidly ask on here and sometimes the mighty and powerful Yooper/Homercidal/Hunter_la/BobbyM/many-other-greats will kindly answer. Fear not asking, keep a thick skin, let the bastages have your sanity but never let them take your sense of humor, and brew on!
 

TasunkaWitko

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Lots of incredibly helpful people here - in fact, thanks to the help of those people, I myself am actually able to give intelligent advice, now and then.

Gila was being light-hearted and joking (terms for dummies), but as for PackersFan, I have no idea what his problem is. Of course, being a Packers Fan would probably be enough to make anyone mad - in both contexts of the word.....
 
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bobcat1

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wow just checked back....lol this escalated quickly. To those who helped thank you.
GILA.... it took a minute but i got your joke.

Packer.......... i'm new to brewing. But not new to internet idiots.
i joined a site to learn and ask questions. I do know what a dictionary is. I just looked up unprofessional, condescending, and imbecile. All are listed as synonyms for packers fans.
 
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OP: Almost all beers fall under ALE or LAGER. These are two different species of yeast, and they perform best at different temperatures (65F and 50F, respectively).

Inside those two major categories, there are a bunch of subcategories. You can sort them out at http://www.bjcp.org/2008styles/catdex.php

There is a wiki here, but it's incomplete. I'll drop the links here, but right away I see there's no entry for lager.

https://www.homebrewtalk.com/wiki/index.php/Category:Glossary
https://www.homebrewtalk.com/wiki/index.php/Category:Abbreviations

I'd like to also point you to a great online resource, from one of the most respected guys in the homebrewing world, John Palmer. This site is an condensed version of his iconic book on brewing, How To Brew. Higly recommended. http://www.howtobrew.com/
 
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bobcat1

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OP: Almost all beers fall under ALE or LAGER. These are two different species of yeast, and they perform best at different temperatures (65F and 50F, respectively).

Inside those two major categories, there are a bunch of subcategories. You can sort them out at http://www.bjcp.org/2008styles/catdex.php

There is a wiki here, but it's incomplete. I'll drop the links here, but right away I see there's no entry for lager.

https://www.homebrewtalk.com/wiki/index.php/Category:Glossary
https://www.homebrewtalk.com/wiki/index.php/Category:Abbreviations

I'd like to also point you to a great online resource, from one of the most respected guys in the homebrewing world, John Palmer. This site is an condensed version of his iconic book on brewing, How To Brew. Higly recommended. http://www.howtobrew.com/
cool thank you!
 

kaconga

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Yeah, definitely pick up how to brew! It is the single best reference I own.
 
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