Taste issue. Beer lines?

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Yesfan

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I'm thinking about changing my beer lines on my keezer. I have experiencing a sharp bite in the after taste of some of the maltier beers I've made.

I have a 4 tap keezer, so thought about maybe changing the lines on two taps for now. If there is a difference, then I would change out the others as well. The lines I have now are from kegconnection and it's their basic line. It's about two years old, but I regularly clean the lines with rinse/BLC/rinse/starsan after every other keg. They still look to be ok, so I don't know. I thought about buying some of their lines with the barrier/BPA free and is anti-microbial. A lot more expensive than the $0.49/ft line.

On another note, the inline filter I have been using on brew day has had one of the hoses develop this white film. The last beer I brewed, extra pale ale, I chose to NOT use the filter in case the filter's hoses were the culprit. Could that have an effect too, or does boiling the wort take care of that?

If so, then I'm thinking the beer lines won't make a difference as the taste was already there before kegging. If I'm right, I won't even bother, but wanted to ask those more in the know before I placed an order. Thanks and sorry for the winded post.
 

brewcat

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I have the silver lines from kegconnection. They are awesome. You should try them out regardless.

Another thing you can look at is your CO2 psi. Running too high could impart a carbonic bite.
 
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Yesfan

Yesfan

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I have the silver lines from kegconnection. They are awesome. You should try them out regardless.

Another thing you can look at is your CO2 psi. Running too high could impart a carbonic bite.
CO2 pressure is 12 psi. That's where it's been at since the day I started kegging. I don't think that would be an issue, since my draft beers haven't always had this taste. I'm willing to bump it down a few if 12 is too high.

I always thought 8-12 was middle ground for typical serving pressure. I'll also go ahead and order those lines from KC. I've got some other things to get as well.
 

day_trippr

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[...]I always thought 8-12 was middle ground for typical serving pressure. [...]
That could be true - there's a temperature relationship that could make any of those pressures perfect for carbing and dispensing at 2.4-2.5 volumes of CO2 - pretty much center field for ales.

So, you decide what your dispensing temperature wants to be, then use our favorite carbonation table to find the pressure to hit and maintain that middle ground, then use the only beer line length calculator worth using to find how long your lines need to be to handle the prescribed CO2 pressure.

Simple, really...

Cheers!
 
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Yesfan

Yesfan

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That could be true - there's a temperature relationship that could make any of those pressures perfect for carbing and dispensing at 2.4-2.5 volumes of CO2 - pretty much center field for ales.

So, you decide what your dispensing temperature wants to be, then use our favorite carbonation table to find the pressure to hit and maintain that middle ground, then use the only beer line length calculator worth using to find how long your lines need to be to handle the prescribed CO2 pressure.

Simple, really...

Cheers!

The hose calculator is new to me (bookmarked), but I remember the CO2 chart. Thank you for the links.



I really don't think my issue is a pressure issue. Temps are 45F, pressure at 12psi, so I'm still in the green going by the co2 chart (2.26). The hose calculator tells me I'm about three ft short, but in all honesty you would think I always had this tastes since I started kegging. I've been kegging for 2-2.5 years now and this problem has only been around for a few months tops.


I did place an order for new beer line (the BPAfree/antimicrobial line from keg connection). I'm going to try it on two of my taps. That might not fix it, but at least it will (hopefully) eliminate that as a possibility.

The last beer I brewed I didn't use my water filter because of the hose lines looking shabby. That's where I'm leaning for now as being the most suspect on my beers' tastes. On another note, I ordered a water test kit from Ward Labs. Figured it couldn't hurt.

I really appreciate the help guys. Wished I could offer up a pint.
 

cyberbrew

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I'm a huge fan of this (I have no affiliation with birdman):
http://www.birdmanbrewing.com/accuflex-bev-seal-ultra-barrier-tubing-3-16-id-100ft-free-shipping/

You have to use John Guest fittings with it (birdman has them as well), but honestly that just makes everything easier (plug and play). I've run beer through this line then switched to carbonated water and there were no off flavors in the water at all. They're definitely stiffer than your standard vinyl but worth it in my mind. If you do go this route use somewhere around 20' for your lines as they have less resistance and tend to foam with shorter lengths at 12+ PSI.
 

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