Targeting a dry IPA

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jtompkin

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I'm trying to make a dry IPA that is at about 7% abv. I'm new to all grain brewing. My first AG batch was good but is a little on the sweet side. The FG came in at was 1.012 but I wanted the beer that was a little less sweet.

I had this beer on primary for 5 days with the secondary at 15 days. To dry it out, my plan on my next attempt is to go 7 days on pri, and 21 on sec.

Is this adding a good plan?

I should also mention I keg the beer. Another thought I had was to keg it at 15 lbs @ 70 deg to let it finish out.

What do you think I should do?
JTBrewing
 

HopNutz

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If you want a dryer IPA, substitute a portion of the base malt for dextrose. Maybe 5-10%. You could also mash a degree or two lower as well.
 
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jtompkin

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Thanks for the advice. I'll share the recipe when I get back to my notes.
 

brewmeister13

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Remember that hops can also provide a perceived sweetness. Pliny the Elder finishes around 1.011 and it is a classical example of dry IPA.
 
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jtompkin

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That's a good point. I'll take another look at my hop selection. Thanks.
 

jro238

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As others have pretty much said, final gravity has everything to do with recipe, mash temp, and yeast health/pitch size and very very little to do with fermentation time.

I actually just got done brewing a pliny the elder clone recipe a few days ago. I have to admit that I haven't ever tried the actual beer since we don't have it out here but I used a 150F mash temp, about 10% dextrose as well as a very small % of crystal malt. This, along with a healthy yeast pitch, got me from 1.072 down to 1.009 in 9 days at 66F. Kegged a bit of it (the gallon or so that wouldn't fit in the dry hopped keg) and was drinking a very good, dry beer 2 days later. Pleasantly dangerous to have a 8-8.5% beer that tastes like a 6% beer and can be enjoyed pint after pint.

Even at a FG of 1.009 though, the hops do give an upfront sweetness as brewmeister mentioned above.
 

KIAKillerXJ

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Mash temp, dextrose, % crystal malts, and hops can all affect perceived sweetness. 1.012 is generally considered fairly dry


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Grannyknot

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For my dry 7% ipa, I shoot for a OG of around 1.064.
I mash at 148*, usually for around 75 minutes.
Keep the crystal malts at or below 5% of the recipe.
I ferment at 67*, then after 2 weeks, I bring it up to about 70-72* to try and finish it off.
For the hops, I steer clear of anything that could add an onion or sweet taste. Summit is a no-no for dry beers, IMO.

I can usually get it down to around 1.008 or 1.009

Some important things to strive for are good mash efficiency, low mash temp, full conversion, & very little crystal malts.
 

Calichusetts

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Don't be afraid to mess around with "drier" malt types, especially the English varieties. I've achieved a dryer beer even finishing as high as 1.014-18. Cut out the crystal completely if you really want a dry beer IMO.
 

KIAKillerXJ

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crystal is residual sweetness. So something like a SMASH could finish quite dry. IMO there is such a thing as too dry, so I'm not exactly sure where you are trying to target. I do like a dry IPA, Pliny being a good example.
 
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