Super Bowl Wagyu Brisket

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amishland

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hey guys check out what I made for the super bowl.
15+ pound wagyu beef brisket
smoked with my weber smokey mountain
used 3 fist sized chunks of applewood
about 1 hour @ 190 deg/f
about 8 hours @ 250 deg/f
let rest wrapped tight in a cooler for 3 hours before slicing and serving



pre smoke pics













 

dap325

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Wow.. I have to stop opening these threads when I'm hungry and a few beers in. Looks like you had some happy guests for the game last week.
 

SpanishCastleAle

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May I ask how much a 15# Waygu brisket costs? Is this stuff fed beer, spent grains, and massaged like Kobe or is it just from Waygu cattle? Looks delicious.
 
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amishland

amishland

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SNF definition of Wagyu
American Style Kobe (Wagyu) Beef
During the second century A.D., a legendary breed of cattle- called Wagyu- were brought from their home on the Asian mainland to a new life in Japan. The breed was refined in the Kobe region of Japan and has become famous around the world for its intense flavor and tenderness. This ancient breed is the foundation for the elite quality of SNAKE RIVER FARMS American Kobe (Wagyu) Beef.

The meat cost was quite reasonable = $60
overnight shipping / packaging cost was $24

Buying steak cuts of wagyu is very expensive, but I assume that there is not as large of a market for brisket is why the price is so affordable.

At $60 next time I may remove the point and grind it and make some burger patties

Locally I have spent about $50 on a full brisket that was CAB Certified Angus Beef

Much different cook / smoke times with the wagyu
Wagyu = 9 hours
CAB = 16 hours

I won my fantasy football league this year so I decided to treat my buddies.

At my super bowl party I sliced and served all of the flat and left the tip for me and my wife to chop and eat as brisket enchiladas the following day.
 

SpanishCastleAle

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Thanks. I always mispell it. :eek: I kinda figured it was Kobe-styled (crossed with Black Angus) but not true Kobe beef. I might have to get some of this...and that Kurobuta pork.

Here is a decent short article on the differences.
 

weirdboy

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It seems kind of insulting to my intelligence to call it wagyu, when it's not, really. The "wa" means "Japanese" and "gyu" means beef. Maybe the cows are Japanese?

I suppose it is like calling a Kolsch-style beer a Kolsch, though.



That cut would probably cost $3000 in Japan.


EDIT:

I see from their website it is apparently the same breed of cattle:

During the second century A.D., a legendary breed of cattle- called Wagyu- were brought from their home on the Asian mainland to a new life in Japan. The breed was refined in the Kobe region of Japan and has become famous around the world for its intense flavor and tenderness. This ancient breed is the foundation for the elite quality of SNAKE RIVER FARMS American Kobe (Wagyu) Beef.
 

Matt Up North

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Praytell, WHY?

The whole idea behind the Wagyu is the marbling. Grinding it and making it into a burger will do nothing to showcase the very reason that it exists.
fat content is fat content and also it is about the texture of the patty. I did find it "funny" removing all of the fat in the first couple of pictures though. I think that if I spent that on that supple a piece of meat I very well might just leave it all on.
 

SpanishCastleAle

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EDIT:I see from their website it is apparently the same breed of cattle:
Actually it is cattle that is cross-bred from Wagyu and Black Angus. So not quite the same breed.

The fat that is layered on the outside isn't what it's all about, it's about the marbling and the fact that the fat itself it way less saturated.

EDIT: And this stuff is not fed beer and given sake massages. Don't know how much they restrict the movement but the true Kobe beef is kept in very tight corrals so they can't move (which they don't like so they are fed beer to keep them 'happy' and stress-free).
 
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Again, it's a texture thing with the beef, and grinding it destroys the texture. You are essentially overpaying for their scraps that they can't use as a steak. It makes zero sense.


Whatever you might say, I have eaten burgers made with all kinds of meat... and a Kobe Beef burger tastes really f'king good. So, how is that not what counts?
 

jmp138

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Looks amazing dude, what did you do as far as a recipe. I've read that alot of people will marinate their brisket over night then dry rub and smoke it. I'm looking at doing one this weekend for an oyster roast and was just looking for a good idea of best practices. Way to go on the wagyu, really quality stuff.
 
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amishland

amishland

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Looks amazing dude, what did you do as far as a recipe. I've read that alot of people will marinate their brisket over night then dry rub and smoke it. I'm looking at doing one this weekend for an oyster roast and was just looking for a good idea of best practices. Way to go on the wagyu, really quality stuff.


I only did some Worcestershire sauce and a bold spicy dry rub apply minutes before going on the smoker.
 
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amishland

amishland

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Again, it's a texture thing with the beef, and grinding it destroys the texture. You are essentially overpaying for their scraps that they can't use as a steak. It makes zero sense.
I am only considering on grinding the point/tip and smoking and serving the flat.
 

bierhaus15

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I kinda figured it was Kobe-styled (crossed with Black Angus) but not true Kobe beef. I might have to get some of this...and that Kurobuta pork.
//RANT//

I know Japanese cuisine is all the rage right now and everyone loves being able to list their favorite chic foods, but it seems like the more people become enamored in the idea of eating something special, the more they forget how simple and pedestrian the origins of their food really are.

As such, Kurobuta pork is nothing more than a Berkshire pig raised in the said prefecture of Japan. Yeah, the Brits have been eating the 'best' pig for centuries! Give something an exotic name and watch it explode in popularity and perceived quality. Actually, if we really want to talk about the best pig, then it would be the Mangalitsa.

Kobe/Wagyu beef. The Grey Goose of the beef world. Seems like a super premium product with a perfect lineage, but alas is a modern concoction produced for a modern and assuming clientele. This whole bit on how Kobe beef comes from cows isolated for thousands of years is a genuine load of BS.

Foremost, red meat wasn't a part of the Japanese diet until the Meiji Restoration (1866) and that change in diet resulted in the mass importation of western cattle into the country. Native cattle bred with western ones in attempts at gaining larger meat yields and long story short - the Wagyu lost it's virginity. It wouldn't be until 1959 that the Japanese decided to create a superior breeding stock out of its native cattle. They found the most inbred/unspoiled cattle they could and after a few generations of back breeding got a cattle that had the characteristics of the traditional wagyu, with the added benefits of european breeds (being larger, more meat).

Kobe beef in all its forms is good, I can't argue with that, though it's not some mythical product unspoiled by man and time with the perfect family lineage. No one was eating fatty wagyu steaks until some guy found out he could make a lot of money selling it as a premium product.
 

SpanishCastleAle

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Kobe beef in all its forms is good, I can't argue with that...
And that's all that really matters, weighed against the cost of course. I don't think most people care about the history/lineage, just the final product. Which as you say, is good in all it's forms. One never really knows until they actually try it. With all the talk of hormones/etc. it seems perfectly reasonable to want to try other sources. I'll prob cook it over mesquite and serve with a chipotle/wasabi/balsamic reduction.:p
 

weirdboy

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Kobe beef in all its forms is good, I can't argue with that, though it's not some mythical product unspoiled by man and time with the perfect family lineage. No one was eating fatty wagyu steaks until some guy found out he could make a lot of money selling it as a premium product.
To be fair, the reason people in Japan like wagyu is because the marbling makes it ideal for yakiniku and shabu shabu. While I'm sure there are some who eat wagyu steaks, most of the time they are freezing it, slicing it paper-thin, and cooking it quickly on a shichirin or in boiling water. The fat distribution makes them practically ideal for this purpose. If you go to a Japanese grocery store or butcher, usually they sell the beef already sliced very thin.

Also, if you go to Japan, Kobe beef is not really the top premium beef. The most expensive one is usually Omi beef, which is pretty rare, and the more commonly found "expensive" beef is Matsuzaka. If you go to an actual steak restaurant like Lawry's, they are still going to sell you prime rib, NY strip, etc.
 

z987k

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Whatever you might say, I have eaten burgers made with all kinds of meat... and a Kobe Beef burger tastes really f'king good. So, how is that not what counts?
Because it's in your head.(which can be enough to be fair)

He's right, grinding it into ground beef loses almost all the qualities of the meat that you pay so much for... so why do it?
 

friarjohn

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i just read the other day that scientist are trying to bring back an extinct bread of cow. can you imagine what a brisket of that will go for! wagyu is the best [email protected] meat out there, as claimed by the bbq king himself Mr. Myron Mixen.
 

z987k

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i just read the other day that scientist are trying to bring back an extinct bread of cow. can you imagine what a brisket of that will go for! wagyu is the best [email protected] meat out there, as claimed by the bbq king himself Mr. Myron Mixen.
Then we should bring back woolly mammoths. I'd like to try one of those.
 

mmb

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Because it's in your head.(which can be enough to be fair)

He's right, grinding it into ground beef loses almost all the qualities of the meat that you pay so much for... so why do it?
Because a good cut of meat, ground, taste better than a low quality piece of meat, ground.

Same could be asked of anyone eating a steak cooked more than rare. Or yellowfin tuna cooked, period. Eat what you want to eat.
 

SpanishCastleAle

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I've never tried them but I've heard some places (like at least some Fuddruckers) have Elk burgers, Ostrich burgers, etc. and they are supposed to be really good.

IME, it depends what you're using the burger meat for. I use the leaner stuff (85:15 or better) for sghetti/chili/etc. but use the medium fat stuff (like 80:20) for burgers.

Regarding Wagyu burgers...allegedly the fat in Wagyu is not the same fat that is in typ beef. It is supoosedly less saturated. If that's the case then you wouldn't lose all the qualities of the meat just by grinding it up.
 

weirdboy

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Ostrich burgers are really good. Elk burgers I could live with or without...same goes for buffalo. It's OK, but the meat tastes gamey and dry to me.

Ostrich, though...yummy! I wish I could find a local supplier of ostrich because I'd use it all the time.

As an aside, Fuddruckers is probably my least favorite of that type of burger place. It is simultaneously expensive and barely mediocre in quality.
 

jpc

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Because a good cut of meat, ground, taste better than a low quality piece of meat, ground.

Same could be asked of anyone eating a steak cooked more than rare. Or yellowfin tuna cooked, period. Eat what you want to eat.
This begs the question... What does "high quality" and "low quality" mean? And this is where it gets tricky.

I am not a fan of filet mignon, in that the texture is crap. Sure it tastes good, but it's mushy. I am a huge fan of NY strip, because it is quite tasty and has great mouthfeel. I will tell you that making a burger out of ground filet will be lacking, even though many think it is a "superior" cut to sirloin.

Then, look at Kobe. Like weirdboy said, the TEXTURE is the reason that it is used for the dishes it is used for. This is a result of the marbling and fat content. This is of little use to a making a good burger. Given the premium that is typically charged for a "kobe burger", I think it is ridiculous to pay this when there is little benefit to the texture and flavor.

Feel free eating and spending as much as you like on whatever you like; that's your prerogative. But I won't allow the smoke of the mysticism of the religion of Kobe beef to be blown up my ass.
 

niquejim

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I cooked 7 lbs of Australian (10-12 grade)Waygu tenderloin for New Years Eve and it was far and away the best steak I've ever had. I did Waygu sliders last week for my son's birthday party and I would agree that while they were great I could get close with fresh ground at home
 
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