Summer ale

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backland

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Hello
I am planning a beer that is ideal for the summer, easy to drink and refreshing. I ask what you think of my recipe, i am ready to accept tips.
Thnak you.

HOME BREW RECIPE:

Brew Method: All Grain
Boil Time: 60 min
Batch Size: 14 liters (fermentor volume)
Boil Size: 18 liters
Boil Gravity: 1.034
Efficiency: 78% (brew house)

STATS:
Original Gravity: 1.044
Final Gravity: 1.008
ABV (standard): 4.7%
IBU (tinseth): 28.12
SRM (morey): 3.49

FERMENTABLES:
1.382 kg - Belgian - Pilsner (54%)
0.692 kg - United Kingdom - Maris Otter Pale (27%)
0.205 kg - German - Wheat Malt (8%)
0.179 kg - German - Carapils (7%)
0.103 kg - German - Acidulated Malt (4%)

HOPS:
3 g - Hallertau Hersbrucker, Type: Pellet, AA: 3.2, Use: Boil for 60 min, IBU: 2.01
5 g - Motueka, Type: Pellet, AA: 6.6, Use: Boil for 60 min, IBU: 6.91
4 g - Rakau, Type: Pellet, AA: 10.7, Use: Boil for 60 min, IBU: 8.96
2 g - Hallertau Hersbrucker, Type: Pellet, AA: 3.2, Use: Boil for 15 min, IBU: 0.66
2 g - Motueka, Type: Pellet, AA: 6.6, Use: Boil for 15 min, IBU: 1.37
2 g - Rakau, Type: Pellet, AA: 10.7, Use: Boil for 15 min, IBU: 2.22
4 g - Hallertau Polaris, Type: Pellet, AA: 22.3, Use: Boil for 5 min, IBU: 3.72
5 g - Motueka, Type: Pellet, AA: 6.6, Use: Boil for 5 min, IBU: 1.38
2 g - Rakau, Type: Pellet, AA: 10.7, Use: Boil for 5 min, IBU: 0.89
2 g - Hallertau Polaris, Type: Pellet, AA: 22.3, Use: Dry Hop for 5 days
2 g - Motueka, Type: Pellet, AA: 6.6, Use: Dry Hop for 5 days

MASH GUIDELINES:
1) Temp: 52 C, Time: 15 min
2) Temp: 67 C, Time: 60 min
3) Temp: 78 C, Time: 5 min
4) Fly Sparge, Temp: 78 C

YEAST:
Fermentis / Safale - American Ale Yeast US-05

PRIMING:

CO2 Level: 6.5 g/l
 

cswis86

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I think the grain bill looks pretty good. If the purpose of adding carapils is only for head retention I would drop it. Since you're adding a good bit of wheat I think you'll get good foam stability without the carapils. Are you adding acidulated for pH adjustment or some tartness? The hop bill looks a little complicated than it needs to be. I'd probably just do 1 hop addition at 60min for bitterness. Mix the remainder of your hops hops in equal parts and do a 15 and 5 min addition. 4g for dry hopping doesn't seem like very much. I'd either drop the dry hop and do a flameout addition or double the dry hops.
 

JKaranka

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Looks overall good. I'd remove the carapils: the grist is good enough without it and it doesn't add anything to it. I'd simplify the hops as mentioned above, increase the IBUs a bit (to 35 or so), and increase the dry hopping to ~10-15 grams. You could use Rakau to bitter and then mix the hops together to give the two additions (15 & 5).
 
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backland

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I think the grain bill looks pretty good. If the purpose of adding carapils is only for head retention I would drop it. Since you're adding a good bit of wheat I think you'll get good foam stability without the carapils. Are you adding acidulated for pH adjustment or some tartness? The hop bill looks a little complicated than it needs to be. I'd probably just do 1 hop addition at 60min for bitterness. Mix the remainder of your hops hops in equal parts and do a 15 and 5 min addition. 4g for dry hopping doesn't seem like very much. I'd either drop the dry hop and do a flameout addition or double the dry hops.
Thanks for your suggestions
Acidulated is for ph adjustment
 
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backland

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Looks overall good. I'd remove the carapils: the grist is good enough without it and it doesn't add anything to it. I'd simplify the hops as mentioned above, increase the IBUs a bit (to 35 or so), and increase the dry hopping to ~10-15 grams. You could use Rakau to bitter and then mix the hops together to give the two additions (15 & 5).
Thanks for your suggestions
35 ibu will not be too bitter?
 
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backland

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I have doubts on mash, you think that my mash is correct to have a beer easy drinkable?
Thanks
 

chickypad

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I'd keep the IBU's where the are, or even a little lower, for a low gravity lawnmower type beer. I agree with the comments about the carapils and the hop schedule being unnecessarily complicated, but if that's what you want to do I don't think it will be bad. For mash schedule I would just do a single rest at 67* then do your mash out at 78* if you wish.
 

JKaranka

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I'm used to British beer bitterness levels, so for something light I do find it more crisp and drinkable when in that 0.75-1 IBU/OG region. Specially golden / summer ales. It can be a bit blah if it doesn't have a bite. Several of the local golden ales are around 1.040-1.045 and 35-40 IBU. Easy to drink stuff. Bitters are similar.
 

z-bob

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I don't see anything wrong. The Carapils is probably unnecessary. The bitterness looks about right or just a little high.

That hop schedule is way more complex than I use; I use 1 variety at 60 minutes for bitterness, and I might add more (same variety or different) at 5 minutes or I might not. If I'm getting really fancy I add hops at 15 and 5 minutes. But this is your beer. Go for it. :)
 

z-bob

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I'm used to British beer bitterness levels, so for something light I do find it more crisp and drinkable when in that 0.75-1 IBU/OG region. Specially golden / summer ales. It can be a bit blah if it doesn't have a bite. Several of the local golden ales are around 1.040-1.045 and 35-40 IBU. Easy to drink stuff. Bitters are similar.
I brewed an English style bitter recently (pale ale malt/C60/corn/Fuggles) that's about 40 IBU's and it's kind of bland. It's thin, and I think I can still taste the water. (it's getting better with age, but it's been in the bottles for 2 months now) It doesn't taste all that bitter, but I wonder if I got the IBU's too high for the gravity and it hides the malt?

I brewed a German style ale (pils/munich/noble hops) that's about the same strength and only about 20 IBU's, and it's very nice. Just enough bitterness to keep it from being sweet. I didn't like it at first, but it just needed another week in the bottles.

(I know I shouldn't compare those recipes because they were so totally different.)
 
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