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Sulfate-to-Chloride Ratio

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EggsInMalta

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I brew a lot of pale ales and IPAs and always wished they were drier/crisper than they always turn out. I recently received a water report and saw that my pH is more alkaline (7.9) and that my sulfate-chloride ratio (15:27) leans toward maltier beers. I want to use gypsum or some other additive to increase sulfates so I can get this drier, more hoppy characteristic.

My question: How much gypsum should I add? Should I add it to the mash or during the boil?

Thanks in advance for your help!
 

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Dgallo

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I brew a lot of pale ales and IPAs and always wished they were drier/crisper than they always turn out. I recently received a water report and saw that my pH is more alkaline (7.9) and that my sulfate-chloride ratio (15:27) leans toward maltier beers. I want to use gypsum or some other additive to increase sulfates so I can get this drier, more hoppy characteristic.

My question: How much gypsum should I add? Should I add it to the mash or during the boil?

Thanks in advance for your help!
You have great neutral water to brew from with low bicarbonate. You may only experience some trouble when brewing dark beers trying to get your ph up.

Download Bru’n water spread sheet. You will then plug in the info from your wards analysis, your grainbill, and then you can play around with your Different addition values to target specific water profiles. This will be far more benificial for you to learn about your water adjustments this way than having some tell you how much gypsum you use. Especially since you’ll probably need other additives like CaCl mgSO4, NaCl, not to mention acids to get your ph in check
 
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EggsInMalta

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You have great neutral water to brew from with low bicarbonate. You may only experience some trouble when brewing dark beers trying to get your ph up.

Download Bru’n water spread sheet. You will then plug in the info from your wards analysis, your grainbill, and then you can play around with your Different addition values to target specific water profiles. This will far more benificial for you to learn about your water adjustments this way than having some tell you how much gypsum you use. Especially since you’ll probably need other additives like CaCl mgSO4, NaCl, not to mention acids to get your ph in check
Thanks!
 

Dgallo

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You’re welcome. Here’s the link;

It seems more intimidating than it is. Read it over and then there are videos on YouTube of people explaining how to use the spreadsheet
 

mabrungard

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No, the sulfate content is actually reported 'as sulfur' and the actual sulfate content is 45 ppm. In either case, the amount of sulfate and chloride in that water are not that significant and wouldn't significantly alter flavor perceptions. You are free to boost either to produce the flavor and perceptions that fit your intended beer.
 
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