Suggestions for Scottish Ale

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DBhomebrew

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How bout between easy drinking and strong? Lol
Traquair House Ale

98% UK pale ale malt (Maris Otter, Golden Promise)
2% Roasted Barley

148° for 60m
1.070 OG

120m boil
26 IBU EKG @ 120m
3 IBU EKG @ 10m

Notty, Tartan, 1728, 028, etc coolish temp
 

DBhomebrew

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There's a popular Traquair House Ale (Skotrat's) recipe online that utilizes the wort reduction technique. The recipe has gotten great reviews from those who've brewed it. The recipe I shared above is from Jeff Alworth's recent book and is attributed to the brewery owner herself.

It gets down to the types of questions I asked at the beginning. Do you want to brew an ale as typically brewed by Scottish breweries, or do you want to brew what is typically thought of Scottish?

Pattinson has shown that Scottish boils were no longer than English. 60-90 minutes most of the time. Traquair's is actually pretty long. You're not getting a huge amount of caramelization in that time.

My hunch, and it's just that, is that the whole kettle caramelization (wort reduction) thing is to add malty flavor to worts made up with mostly US 2-row which lacks the flavor intensity of Old World malts.
 

easttex

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Brewed this recipe back in January - principally because I needed to make a large batch of yeast to ferment a Strong Scotch Ale (Wee Heavy) over afterwards. This was well reviewed by the folks I allowed to try it.

scottish80.JPG


This is a five gallon recipe, based on roughly 60% brewhouse efficiency. I buy RO water and make up water additions. Furthermore, I wrote this recipe around what my local homebrew shop had available - before I realized they also carried Simpson's Golden Promise which I am told is the base malt to make a Scottish ale. I may brew it again next January once I'm beyond the holidays and burned out on hoppy beers again.
 
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kevin58

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As DBhomebrew says do yourself a favor and go search the blog Shut Up About Barclay Perkins. better yet, buy Ron's book Scotland! II. It is loaded with recipes and information that will dispel all the myths like the one that suggests Scottish brewers boiled for long periods of time or that they somehow caramelized their wort. Or perhaps the worse myth ever that they used peat smoked malt. They did not.
 
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As DBhomebrew says do yourself a favor and go search the blog Shut Up About Barclay Perkins. better yet, buy Ron's book Scotland! II. It is loaded with recipes and information that will dispel all the myths like the one that suggests Scottish brewers boiled for long periods of time or that they somehow caramelized their wort. Or perhaps the worse myth ever that they used peat smoked malt. They did not.
My favorite scotch ale was McEwan's Scotch Ale. They stopped making it for a while, but somebody else is making it now. Anyway, it had a noticeable flavor of caramelization. Not sure how they got it in there, but I like it.

Here's my 5g recipe. A friend of mine (who, BTW, won gold at NHC comp) told me it was the best beer I'd ever made. I thought it was pretty good too :) I did boil some of it down as I described above. I definitely don't make beers with this many malts in them anymore, but what can I say, it was good. Yes, I put a little smoked malt in there haha.

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