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Styrian Goldings vs Fuggles

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birvine

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I posted a similar but slightly different post in the Hops section...

For someone who REALLY knows their hops, are Fuggles and SG so close that I could substitute one for the other or are they fairly unique? I would like to grow SG but will sub Fuggles if I cannot find the rhizomes anywhere in Canada.

B
 

boostsr20

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Fuggles is generally listed as SG is directly related to it. I think SG is just a seedless version of Fuggles.
 

Scooby_Brew

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Fuggels, Styrian Goldings and Willamette are all the same hops, or at least are closely related. Fuggels are from the UK, Styrian Goldings is a version of Fuggles and grow in Slovenia and Willamette are another version grown in Oregon. I have heard that you can use Willamette or Fuggles instead of SG if you just age them a little (i.e. leave them sitting in the hot sun for a day or two). https://www.homebrewtalk.com/wiki/index.php/Willamette
 

Ølbart

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Fuggles and Styrians are supposedly genetically identical (and also the same as U.S. Tettnang), but Styrians are grown in Slovenia, which apparently gives them a slightly different aroma.

four other accessions (Fuggle, ‘Styrian’, ‘Savinja Golding’ and ‘USA Tettnang’) all grouped together into a single cluster. The later three accessions are thought to be clonal selections from Fuggle. Both Sustar-Vozlic and Javornik (1999) and Jakse et al. (2001) could not differentiate genetic differences (on the basis of DNA) between Fuggle and Savinja Golding. Styrian is thought to be Fuggle introduced to former Yugoslavia circa 1900 (personal communication, A. Haunold, 1998).
From here.
 

14thstreet

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I've used Willamette as a dry hop sub in this recipe and I thought they were thisclose in aroma.
As a sub for either? I've used Styrians before but in very low amounts so I really couldn't pick it out. I've got a Landlord coming up in the pipeline and Mister Mertz's Bitter might be a nice re-brew comparison!
 
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