stir plate/ starter question

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so I've been doing starters for my brews and I am about to build a stir plate. I've read that one technique is to let the stir plate work for 24 hours then place the starter in the fridge to settle everything to the bottom. Someone told me you do this because you don't want all the aerated starter going into your wort? This dosent make sence b/c the wort should be aerated anyway. Wat effect would just dumping the whole thing into the wort have
 

bad coffee

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by putting it in the fridge, the yeast settles out. You can then dump (decant) the spent wort off the top of the yeast slurry.

B
 

SilverKing

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In my experience, the starter tastes nothing like the beer I'm brewing... usually bad. So, when I make a large starter, I'm not interested in putting that into my final product.

I chill, let it settle, decant off as much of the nasty stuff as I can, then swirl it up and pour it in. Never fails.
 

Thirsty_Monk

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If you do up to 2 liter starters clam is that there is no need to decant.

If you are going to decant starter the yeast "should" go thru the whole "lifecycle".

24-36 hours is the growth phase.
Then fermentation and flocculation. You know that yeast is done (flocculated) when starter become to be clear again.

After flocculation put the starter to the fridge for 24 hours and then decant the spent wort.
 

noisy123

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Depending on the size of the starter is decanting really necessary? I do this for bigger starters but for <1 L I have not been bothering with this. I often top-up anyway and pitching 1 L doesn't seem like a big deal to me.
 

Tonedef131

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Depending on the size of the starter is decanting really necessary? I do this for bigger starters but for <1 L I have not been bothering with this. I often top-up anyway and pitching 1 L doesn't seem like a big deal to me.
That's how I look at it. A 1L starter is the absolute smallest I would ever make and I will just pitch the whole lot with those. Even with most beers (light delicate lagers and the like excluded) I will pitch a whole 2L starter. But when I start getting up close to a gallon I am certainly going to decant that garbage and just use the slurry.
 

SilverKing

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Depending on the size of the starter is decanting really necessary? I do this for bigger starters but for <1 L I have not been bothering with this. I often top-up anyway and pitching 1 L doesn't seem like a big deal to me.
I almost always decant. just 'cause.
 

conpewter

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If you do up to 2 liter starters clam is that there is no need to decant.

If you are going to decant starter the yeast "should" go thru the whole "lifecycle".

24-36 hours is the growth phase.
Then fermentation and flocculation. You know that yeast is done (flocculated) when starter become to be clear again.

After flocculation put the starter to the fridge for 24 hours and then decant the spent wort.
Using a stirplate the starter never becomes clear since the yeast are always in suspension (which is one of the reasons to use a stirplate) I just wait 2 days and put it in the fridge, then decant.
 
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