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Steeping Volume

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Dextersmom

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Why is it normally suggested that you steep in a smaller amount than you intend on boiling when using steeping grains.

example: recipe i just did said to steep in a half gallon of water for 30 minutes at 160, then sparge with a gallon of 160 degree water, then add another gallon of water to make 2.5 gallons to do the boil.

why not just steep at 2.5 gallons?
 

malkore

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IMO it doesn't really matter. some people will talk about potential pH issues by using too much water, but with steeping you're not really converting anything, and there's usually no enzymes to extract tannins due to pH and temperature anyways.

That said, I would suggest 1.5 gallons to steep, and then sparge the grains with another gallon of 150F water after 30 minutes. then bring the steeping water/wort to a boil like normal.
 

david_42

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Steeping in a small volume, then rinsing makes the most sense if you are using a pot for steeping and a strainer for rinsing. If you are using bags in your boil kettle, using a larger amount of water is easier, just don't pack the bags. When I'm doing extract with grains and a partial boil, I'll use my VLGB in 2.5-3 gallons.
 

DUCCCC

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Quoted from Brewing Classic Styles, Jamil Zainasheff and John J. Palmer, Page 292:
Tips:For best flavor results, the ratio of steeping grains to water should be less than 1 gallon (3.8 liters) per pound. This will help keep the pH below 6 and minimize tannin extraction in alkaline water.
 
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