Steeping specialty grains in an extract kit??

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whatwedoislegal

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Hey guys,

I am fairly new to homebrewing (4 brews so far) and when doing some research about partial mashing, I noticed the big difference is steeping grains. Am I correct on this?? If so, I have the equipment to do so.

Two questions:

1.) Can I steep the grain bill the same way partial mashers do??

2.) Can I add an extra 1/4# to the 1# grain bill even if it doesn't call for it? I want to add 1/4# of Special-B for those caramel/raisin notes.

That said, I'd like the overall malt profiles to come through more (if partial mashing does help with this).

Thanks!
:cool:
 

slykwilli

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Partial mash is nothing more than a few pounds of grain in a muslin bag that you hang in your pot to steep and if you are limited to extract I would definitely do partials. The nice thing about doing partials is that it is much easier to start experimenting with recipes. Give it a go I say, have some fun!
 

RM-MN

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There are differences in partial mash and steeping grain. Partial mash requires that there be convertible malts (base malt) and the temperature must be kept at the proper mash temperature. Steeping grains have little or no enzymes to convert the starch to sugar so the temperature control isn't nearly as critical.

Yes you can steep the grain the same way partial mashers do. You won't get any extra fermentable sugars but it would be good practice if you should want to go partial mash or all grain in the future.

Yes you can add more/other grains. It won't come out the same as the original recipe but it could come out better or worse. Don't get crazy with the amounts and especially with the darker malts as the flavor can be intense. These are recipes, not chemical formulas. This experimentation is how different recipes are arrived at.
 

unionrdr

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Mashing also uses less water than steeping,& at more precise temps. It depends on how fermentable you want the conversion to be.
 
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