Steeping question.

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Corey61753

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I have done a few all-grain batches and want to try some extract recipes. When steepin what temperature and how long do they need to steep? Thanks in advance.
 

camonick

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Most recipes recommend 150-170° for 30 minutes. When I was doing extract batches, I tried to stay between 155-160°.
 

BrewnWKopperKat

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want to try some extract recipes. When steeping, what temperature and how long do they need to steep?
Personally, when I brew with malt extracts, I have a shorter brew day in mind, so I steep similar to @FloppyKnockers . Start with distilled, RO, or low mineral water add the crystal / caramel / roasted malts at flame-on, heat the water, remove the steeping grains when the water gets to around 170F.

Some kit makers (e.g. Northern Brewer's Caribou Slobber) also this process (add steeping grains at flame-on), perhaps because it leads to a shorter brew day. Other kit makers steep for 30 minutes at 150F perhaps because it looks / feels like a "all-grain" brewing process. Recipes from books / magazines generally need to follow the recipe publishing standards that the book / magazine decides to use.

There are a couple of additional approaches that are occasionally mentioned:
  1. an overnight cold steep of crystal / caramel / roasted malts.
  2. steep in a 2nd kettle while the water in the 1st kettle is heating to a boil.
Either of the four steeping processes will work well.

About a year ago, I brewed a couple of batches side-by-side, varying just the brand of malt extract. Brand of malt extract is likely to have a greater impact on the final beer flavor than the steeping technique used.
 

RM-MN

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Most recipes recommend 150-170° for 30 minutes. When I was doing extract batches, I tried to stay between 155-160°.
I encourage this approach as it makes it easier if you transition to all grain. If you can keep the steep between 150 and 160, you can keep the mash in that range too.
 

BrewnWKopperKat

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With BIAB, many people (including me) wrap the kettle either insulation (e.g. Reflectix) or a sleeping bag and insulate the lid. Typically I see a 2-4F drop over 30-60 minutes. One certainly can practice this technique while brewing extract+steep.
 

davidabcd

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As above, meaning I've done the grains cold and heated up to, but not above, 170°F or heated the water first and steeped in those same ranges but time-wise 45 minutes.
Also, some 170°F water to rinse the grain bag.
 

mygar

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Personally, when I brew with malt extracts, I have a shorter brew day in mind, so I steep similar to @FloppyKnockers . Start with distilled, RO, or low mineral water add the crystal / caramel / roasted malts at flame-on, heat the water, remove the steeping grains when the water gets to around 170F.

Some kit makers (e.g. Northern Brewer's Caribou Slobber) also this process (add steeping grains at flame-on), perhaps because it leads to a shorter brew day. Other kit makers steep for 30 minutes at 150F perhaps because it looks / feels like a "all-grain" brewing process. Recipes from books / magazines generally need to follow the recipe publishing standards that the book / magazine decides to use.

There are a couple of additional approaches that are occasionally mentioned:
  1. an overnight cold steep of crystal / caramel / roasted malts.
  2. steep in a 2nd kettle while the water in the 1st kettle is heating to a boil.
Either of the four steeping processes will work well.

About a year ago, I brewed a couple of batches side-by-side, varying just the brand of malt extract. Brand of malt extract is likely to have a greater impact on the final beer flavor than the steeping technique used.
Excellent! You perfectly answered a question I was going to pose ... as i have an extract/steeping brew day tomorrow :) Thanks!! After this batch i will try an all grain
 

mygar

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But with small batch brewing (1 gal)... initial volume of 1.25 .. i think i will hit 170 pretty quick... The recipe from NB calls to start steep at flame on for 20 min or until 170. Maybe a steep for 30 min at 155 is best?
 

BrewnWKopperKat

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I'll suggest steeping for 30 min at 155F.

Unless ... ;)

With an alarm thermometer (I have a Thermoworks ChefAlarm®), one could add the steeping grains at flame-on and set the alarm for 150. If the temperature alarm goes off before the 20 (or 30) minute steep is complete, hold the wort temperature at 155 for the rest of the steep.

With my all-grain batches, I will set an alarm for a little below my strike water temperature, then weigh / mill grains while the water is heating. The alarm also works for keeping an eye on mash temperatures. When I'm heating to a boil, I'll set the alarm for around 200, then measure out hops, ...
 

mygar

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I'll suggest steeping for 30 min at 155F.

Unless ... ;)

With an alarm thermometer (I have a Thermoworks ChefAlarm®), one could add the steeping grains at flame-on and set the alarm for 150. If the temperature alarm goes off before the 20 (or 30) minute steep is complete, hold the wort temperature at 155 for the rest of the steep.

With my all-grain batches, I will set an alarm for a little below my strike water temperature, then weigh / mill grains while the water is heating. The alarm also works for keeping an eye on mash temperatures. When I'm heating to a boil, I'll set the alarm for around 200, then measure out hops, ...
hhmm... I believe my wife has pamper chef thermometer with alarm...so maybe I could do that?

But my batch after this, I plan on doing my first all grain. So holding 155 for 30 min would be good test run. If I did ... maybe hit strike temp at 160... put in steep bag ... and place in warm oven?
 

mygar

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I'll drop out of the discussion for a moment (I don't use my oven for mashing).
Well at some point I would like to go 2.5g all grain. I have heard that for 1g its easy to keep mash temp of kettle in oven since it fits. But I think I would like to practice what would work for 2-3. Thinking about a small cooler mash ton and doing batch sparge. The details a bit sketchy to me as it sees there is a lot of variation of what folks do
 
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