Starter Size Gone Wrong!

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ryan810cows

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So this is my second batch I've made. This time I'm making a starter using a stir plate. When I looked up what size starter I need, I missed the part on Mr. Malty where is said I needed two packs of used and a 1.02 L starter.

I will put this in the fridge tomorrow night... And take it out Sunday AM, decant it off, then bring to room temp before pitching.

I have a OG: 1.075 Black IPA going to be Brewer this Sunday.

View attachment ImageUploadedByHome Brew1452223909.746177.jpg

What I saw later was if I was only going to use one Wyeast Smack Pack, I needed to make a 2.54 L starter. And of course, I saw this after I had made the original Volume, cooled it, and put it on the stir plate.

View attachment ImageUploadedByHome Brew1452223895.080545.jpg

Is this batch going to suffer now? The only trick I still have up my sleeve is I will be adding used nutrients to the end of the boil to help get things going... Bigger .. Faster... Stronger!! Will I be good or do I need to do something else before Brew day.
 

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An undersized starter is better than no starter. And 2 packs in a 1L starter will get you insignificant growth anyway (unless the yeast is VERY old).

So you're probably underpitching. However, good thing is, of all the cell count growth models I'm aware of, the Mr. Malty growth curve is by far the most conservative. Other models will project you being a little bit closer to an ideal pitching rate (although probably still low).

Let it ride and see what happens.
 

IslandLizard

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Is this WY1272? It's a lovely yeast for IPAs, makes them very juicy!

You need a 2.5 liter starter. Do you have a larger jug, like a gallon one? Prepare the extra starter wort needed to get to 2.5 liter and combine.

Mr. Malty tends to be a bit conservative, so a 2 liter starter maybe just fine, or even 1.5 l if the yeast was treated very well. But 1 liter is not enough.

If you overgrow the starter a bit, save some of it (don't pitch) to make your next "clean" starter. Also harvest the yeast after this Black IPA is done. You can ferment another 3 batches from that, and 3 from each of those...

On another note, even if instructions tell you to, don't rack this to a secondary, let it go for 2-3 weeks in the primary before doing anything. Some sort of temperature control during the first 3-7 days is recommended. A cool place, keep the fermenting beer around 63°F.
 
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ryan810cows

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Thanks all for the responses! Yes I'm using a 1272 on this batch.

When would it be too late to add another leader to this starter? Reason I ask is I won't be able to until tonight and that will be 24 hours. I may be out of luck on this one in regards to making a bigger starter. But the other small truck I have up my sleeve that I forgot to mention is that I have a pure oxygen wand that I will put in the fort for 30 sec after pitching.

On a different note, I have been wondering about harvesting the yeast. Is that just saving all of the solid that go to the bottom of the firm in or after the two or three weeks? And then top the jar with sterilized water? Then refrigerate.

If so, how do I prepare that for an additional batch later?
 

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Or you can put the starter in the fridge for 12-24 hours, then decant and step it up with more wort !
 

IslandLizard

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I'm so glad humans can still read correctly after autocorrect. leader? small truck? fort? ;)

Knowing not everyone will agree, I would add that liter of starter wort as early tonight as possible and grow more yeast. Let it stir all the time, omit the cold crash, and pitch the whole starter jug. You may want to leave 10% or so behind to make a starter for a future batch (save $$). Fill a 6 or 8 oz mason jar and pitch the rest. Oxygenate.

Practice good sanitation, of course.
 
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ryan810cows

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HA! Yay... That's what I get for talking to Siri and having HER do all the typing! :D

So here's what I will do: I will throw my 1 liter starter in the fridge when I get home, decant tomorrow AM, make another liter of wort, add to original starter and stir it up until around 12pm Sunday where I will pitch about 90% around.

As for saving the 10% or so, do I than consider that mason jar full as if it was a "Yeast Pack" or is there more to it then that when it comes time to make another starter? Also, with the Oxygenating portion, would I just fill the mason jar and then put my O2 wand in it for a bit, then seal it up good, then refrigerate it until my next batch in a few months?

Thanks again for your help guys! I'm still learning all the tricks of the trade!:fro:

Please let me know if you see that I need to change something again.
 

TheMadKing

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I would agree with IslandLizard and just add another liter of starter wort.

another option is to step up your starter by chilling and decanting and pitching it into fresh starter wort. They will probably accomplish the same thing.

Another thing I notice though, you want to loosen your aluminum foil a bit. It should allow gas exchange freely so you want it sitting pretty loose on there.
 

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HA! Yay... That's what I get for talking to Siri and having HER do all the typing! :D

So here's what I will do: I will throw my 1 liter starter in the fridge when I get home, decant tomorrow AM, make another liter of wort, add to original starter and stir it up until around 12pm Sunday where I will pitch about 90% around.

As for saving the 10% or so, do I than consider that mason jar full as if it was a "Yeast Pack" or is there more to it then that when it comes time to make another starter? Also, with the Oxygenating portion, would I just fill the mason jar and then put my O2 wand in it for a bit, then seal it up good, then refrigerate it until my next batch in a few months?

Thanks again for your help guys! I'm still learning all the tricks of the trade!:fro:

Please let me know if you see that I need to change something again.
There's no need to oxygenate your stored yeast, just put it in the fridge and when you're ready to make a new starter with it, just decant all the wort off and pitch it like a new smack pack.
 
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ryan810cows

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I would agree with IslandLizard and just add another liter of starter wort.

another option is to step up your starter by chilling and decanting and pitching it into fresh starter wort. They will probably accomplish the same thing.

Another thing I notice though, you want to loosen your aluminum foil a bit. It should allow gas exchange freely so you want it sitting pretty loose on there.
Good to know. I will loosen up the tin foil!

REALLY appreciate the feedback every gives!
 
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ryan810cows

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There's no need to oxygenate your stored yeast, just put it in the fridge and when you're ready to make a new starter with it, just decant all the wort off and pitch it like a new smack pack.
EXCELLENT!!! I was hoping that was the case! I will try that out my next batch than!

Is there any good way to make sure the yeast is still good before I pitch it into my next batch later down the road? I know with the smack packs they inflate.
 

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EXCELLENT!!! I was hoping that was the case! I will try that out my next batch than!

Is there any good way to make sure the yeast is still good before I pitch it into my next batch later down the road? I know with the smack packs they inflate.
That is one of the many reasons for making a starter. If the yeast is good, you'll be able to tell from the starter activity so you don't accidentally ruin a whole batch of beer.

There's not really any way to tell by simply looking at it though.
 

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I'm so glad humans can still read correctly after autocorrect. leader? small truck? fort? ;)

Knowing not everyone will agree, I would add that liter of starter wort as early tonight as possible and grow more yeast. Let it stir all the time, omit the cold crash, and pitch the whole starter jug. You may want to leave 10% or so behind to make a starter for a future batch (save $$). Fill a 6 or 8 oz mason jar and pitch the rest. Oxygenate.

Practice good sanitation, of course.
Since you know not everyone will agree, i'll be that guy...

Typically starter beer doesn't taste very good, and it certainly doesn't taste like the IPA you are trying to make... all that volume will dilute all the great hops and malt flavors you will spend an entire brew day trying to perfect.

I would rather chill, decant and under-pitch than pitch the entire jug of starter beer.
 
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ryan810cows

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That is one of the many reasons for making a starter. If the yeast is good, you'll be able to tell from the starter activity so you don't accidentally ruin a whole batch of beer.

There's not really any way to tell by simply looking at it though.
So I would tell by the increase in bubbles and Krausen? I know... I'm a bit wet behind the ears!
 

TheMadKing

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So I would tell by the increase in bubbles and Krausen? I know... I'm a bit wet behind the ears!
Yep exactly right. And if there is no krausen because of the stir plate (which is common for me) just turn off the stir plate for 20 minutes or so and a light krausen should form
 
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ryan810cows

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Since you know not everyone will agree, i'll be that guy...

Typically starter beer doesn't taste very good, and it certainly doesn't taste like the IPA you are trying to make... all that volume will dilute all the great hops and malt flavors you will spend an entire brew day trying to perfect.

I would rather chill, decant and under-pitch than pitch the entire jug of starter beer.
I agree.. SO.. I might try and do a bit a BOTH worlds than. I will double up on my starter.

1L Starter: 24hours, Fridge: 12-18hours, Decant
THEN
Make ANOTHER 1L of WORT, Cool, add to ORIGINAL Decanted Starter, Stir: 18-24hours, Fridge: 12hours, Decant, PITCH!
 
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ryan810cows

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Yep exactly right. And if there is no krausen because of the stir plate (which is common for me) just turn off the stir plate for 20 minutes or so and a light krausen should form
Glad you mentioned that... I was thinking that was the case.. I happened to notice that when I turn off my plate for a bit early this AM and then started to see some form. then turn on the plate and pretty much was gone!

Thanks for the confirmation!
 

IslandLizard

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HA! Yay... That's what I get for talking to Siri and having HER do all the typing! :D

So here's what I will do: I will throw my 1 liter starter in the fridge when I get home, decant tomorrow AM, make another liter of wort, add to original starter and stir it up until around 12pm Sunday where I will pitch about 90% around.
There are 2 different approaches proposed here, one includes a cold crash (@QcSylvanio, @TheMadKing 2nd option, @ChemEng ), the other (my take) doesn't: just increase the starter and pitch the yeast with all the starter wort, except for saving 10%.

Using the Cold Crash method:
I don't think you'll be able to cold crash and get all the yeast to drop out in 12 hours, WY1272 being a medium flocculator, will take at least 24 hours, more likely 48. The yeast that doesn't floc out, is the yeast fraction that remains in suspension the longest and is responsible for finishing your beer later (attenuating and conditioning). The starter beer will still be cloudy and you'll be sending those important cells down the drain when decanting too early...

Then, building a new starter in 24 hours is possible, but you'll need to add at least 2 liters of starter wort, OR only use 1/3 of your first step slurry if pitching in only a liter of fresh starter wort. On Sunday you'll have to pitch that whole starter without cold crashing, because there is not enough time to cold crash between 6am and 12pm on Sunday, before you pitch. Again you can save 10% for the future.

My approach (no Cold Crash):
As outlined before.

As for saving the 10% or so, do I than consider that mason jar full as if it was a "Yeast Pack" or is there more to it then that when it comes time to make another starter? Also, with the Oxygenating portion, would I just fill the mason jar and then put my O2 wand in it for a bit, then seal it up good, then refrigerate it until my next batch in a few months?

Thanks again for your help guys! I'm still learning all the tricks of the trade!:fro:

Please let me know if you see that I need to change something again.
My guess is the 10% saved should represent about 30 billion cells, and they are fresh that Sunday. The clock starts ticking on those from that moment on. Those will be your starting data when calculating for your next starter, which you likely need to build in 2 steps (.6 liter and 2 liter) to get 260-300 billion cells again.

Do NOT oxygenate the saved starter, and just leave the starter beer on top after the yeast settles out. Keep it in the fridge, but protect from freezing. When you're ready to prepare your new starter, decant moss of the clear starter beer, and pitch the slurry into the new starter wort.

It is very possible to save 16 oz of starter (20%, ~60 billion) after using my method. I didn't run it through the calculator.

I guess you now need to find a gallon jug...
 
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TheMadKing

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I agree.. SO.. I might try and do a bit a BOTH worlds than. I will double up on my starter.

1L Starter: 24hours, Fridge: 12-18hours, Decant
THEN
Make ANOTHER 1L of WORT, Cool, add to ORIGINAL Decanted Starter, Stir: 18-24hours, Fridge: 12hours, Decant, PITCH!
Sounds like a solid plan to me.

The only thing I would change is decrease time on the stir plate and increase the time in the fridge.

I would give 24 hours in the fridge minimum before decanting, otherwise you're dumping out a significant amount of yeast that still hasn't flocculated. Plus you only need between 12-18 hours on the stir plate to reach maximum yeast growth.

Also, make sure you let the original yeast slurry warm to room temp before you pitch that second liter, otherwise you can shock your yeast.
 
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Thanks guys! I will do some sort of discussion matrix and go from there! YOU GUYS ROCK!
 
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ryan810cows

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Then, building a new starter in 24 hours is possible, but you'll need to add at least 2 liters of starter wort, OR only use 1/3 of your first step slurry if pitching in only a liter of fresh starter wort. On Sunday you'll have to pitch that whole starter without cold crashing, because there is not enough time to cold crash between 6am and 12pm on Sunday, before you pitch. Again you can save 10% for the future.
So if I did the Chill for 24 hours and decant method.. I would need to make about 2 additional liters of fresh wort and then add the decanted yeast starter (after it was warmed to room temp) to the new 2L of wort? Why I couldn't I just make 1 new Liter of wort and add it to the original 1 Liter giving me a total of 2 liters of starter then pitch is all?
 

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So if I did the Chill for 24 hours and decant method.. I would need to make about 2 additional liters of fresh wort and then add the decanted yeast starter (after it was warmed to room temp) to the new 2L of wort?
If you crash and decant your 1 liter starter, then add 1 liter fresh wort to the slurry, the cell density is already maxed out at 1 liter, it won't grow. Instead, when you add only 1/3 of the crashed slurry it can still grow and will triple.

Why I couldn't I just make 1 new Liter of wort and add it to the original 1 Liter giving me a total of 2 liters of starter then pitch is all?
Unless Siri is misinterpreting you again, YES, that sounds just like what I suggested in the first place: Add 1 liter of fresh wort to your current starter, let it stir until ready to pitch, no crashing, no decanting. Pitch the whole thing.

I fully agree with the observation someone made earlier that starter wort doesn't taste the best and adding it all to the fermentor is not ideal. Correctly cold crashing and decanting the starter would be best. Yet, I'm willing to bet that 2 liters of it in a 10x larger, very assertively tasting batch of IPA with a boatload of hops, will be very difficult to detect, if at all.

From what I remember it took 2-3 days to crash WY1272, a luxury of time you don't have. Even if you cold crashed that liter tonight until Sunday 12pm, 36 hours may not be enough time to clear the starter beer. Decanting will then lose your lower floc population. 1.075 is still a respectable gravity, needing 271 billion yeast cells. Your 1 liter starter only contains 200 billion or thereabout. You'd be underpitching by a bit (~25%), which maybe OK with a good dose of pure O2 right before the pitch. There are some more recent theories on required pitch rates. Also realize that most calculators are very conservative on age-related yeast viability.

I'm more concerned about decanting after an incomplete cold crash, pouring off a significant portion of the low floc gene pool, which in the end really makes your beer and helps prevent it from stalling or ending with high final gravity. Especially in the light of having 100% Dark LME* as your only fermentables in that batch...

Does the recipe tell you to use some of that pound of priming sugar (dextrose) in the boil? You only need about 3.5 oz for bottling, leaving you with 12.5oz.

*Speaking of LME, you know how and when to add that, right?
 
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OK.. so i'm NOW going to do the following due to that fact I just don't think I will have the time it will take to do it 100% correctly ... Let me know you thoughts. If you think this is pointless or something's a big no-no, let me know.:confused:

1-7-15 Thur @ 9:40pm: Started my 1L starter on a stir Plate.
1-8-15 Fri @ 8pm: Make and add an additional 1L of wort to ORIGINAL 1L of starter, put ALL on stir plate.
1-9-15 Sat @ 8am (or so) Take off stir plate and put in fridge.
1-10-15 Sun @ 11am (or so) Decant off wort, bring to room temp.
1-10-15 Sun @ 12/1pm PITCH!

NEXT time.. I will allow for more time and do it right from the start...
 
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ryan810cows

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If you crash and decant your 1 liter starter, then add 1 liter fresh wort to the slurry, the cell density is already maxed out at 1 liter, it won't grow. Instead, when you add only 1/3 of the crashed slurry it can still grow and will triple.



Unless Siri is misinterpreting you again, YES, that sounds just like what I suggested in the first place: Add 1 liter of fresh wort to your current starter, let it stir until ready to pitch, no crashing, no decanting. Pitch the whole thing.

I fully agree with the observation someone made earlier that starter wort doesn't taste the best and adding it all to the fermentor is not ideal. Correctly cold crashing and decanting the starter would be best. Yet, I'm willing to bet that 2 liters of it in a 10x larger, very assertively tasting batch of IPA with a boatload of hops, will be very difficult to detect, if at all.

From what I remember it took 2-3 days to crash WY1272, a luxury of time you don't have. Even if you cold crashed that liter tonight until Sunday 12pm, 36 hours may not be enough time to clear the starter beer. Decanting will then lose your lower floc population. 1.075 is still a respectable gravity, needing 271 billion yeast cells. Your 1 liter starter only contains 200 billion or thereabout. You'd be underpitching by a bit (~25%), which maybe OK with a good dose of pure O2 right before the pitch. There are some more recent theories on required pitch rates. Also realize that most calculators are very conservative on age-related yeast viability.

I'm more concerned about decanting after an incomplete cold crash, pouring off a significant portion of the low floc gene pool, which in the end really makes your beer and helps prevent it from stalling or ending with high final gravity. Especially in the light of having 100% Dark LME* as your only fermentables in that batch...

Does the recipe tell you to use some of that pound of priming sugar (dextrose) in the boil? You only need about 3.5 oz for bottling, leaving you with 12.5oz.

*Speaking of LME, you know how and when to add that, right?

You bring up very VERY good points...

I'm going to go with your plan. I will add 1L of new wort and keep everything on the stir plate until 12pm Sunday!

I will be re-reading over your posts again to make sure I understand all that good info.

I just want to make sure everyone knows I appreciate everyone's help!

PS... YES.. you did say that already! I think I was a bit disconnected for the moment!! :tank::ban:
 

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OK.. so i'm NOW going to do the following due to that fact I just don't think I will have the time it will take to do it 100% correctly ... Let me know you thoughts. If you think this is pointless or something's a big no-no, let me know.:confused:

1-7-15 Thur @ 9:40pm: Started my 1L starter on a stir Plate.
1-8-15 Fri @ 8pm: Make and add an additional 1L of wort to ORIGINAL 1L of starter, put ALL on stir plate.
1-9-15 Sat @ 8am (or so) Take off stir plate and put in fridge.
1-10-15 Sun @ 11am (or so) Decant off wort, bring to room temp.
1-10-15 Sun @ 12/1pm PITCH!

NEXT time.. I will allow for more time and do it right from the start...
Our posts came in around the same time. There are some explanations in mine why incomplete crashing and decanting is undesirable.

You're right, let yeast dictate your schedule, not the other way around! She knows she's in charge of your beer (and thus you). Doesn't even take brains to know that. 270 billion mistresses...
 

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I grabbed a PDF what looks like a current recipe of this beer. It mentions adding the pound of dextrose at 15 minutes. It also mentions dark roasted steeping grains. I don't see those listed on your picture. Are they included?

There are a few pointers on brewing (extract) IPAs you should know that are outside the realm of standard retail kit instructions, but makes better beer. HBT and other forums are far ahead of these kit manufacturers. Even their mentioning of racking to a secondary discredits them badly on process. But I'm pretty sure the ingredients are good and fresh, so you've got that!
 
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I grabbed a PDF what looks like a current recipe of this beer. It mentions adding the pound of dextrose at 15 minutes. It also mentions dark roasted steeping grains. I don't see those listed on your picture. Are they included?

There are a few pointers on brewing (extract) IPAs you should know that are outside the realm of standard retail kit instructions, but makes better beer. HBT and other forums are far ahead of these kit manufacturers. Even their mentioning of racking to a secondary discredits them badly on process. But I'm pretty sure the ingredients are good and fresh, so you've got that!

Yep! It comes with specialty grains. I already went through the box.

As for secondary, I won't be going to secondary until about 3 weeks after pitching.

The instructions say to add the whole 1 LB of sugar. I will be using the sugar pills from Norther Brewer for bottling so I won't we transferring to a bottling bucket.

One question I have though... Something you mentioned... Am I supposed to add my wort to the fermenter, put in my O2, THEN Pitch? Or add everything THEN O2? Maybe something that doesn't matter... Just wondering.
 
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You're right, let yeast dictate your schedule, not the other way around! She knows she's in charge of your beer (and thus you). Doesn't even take brains to know that. 270 billion mistresses...

LOL!! I already have a wife... I'm learning with this hobby that I NOW have MANY more wife's to keep happy!!
 

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In line answers.
Yep! It comes with specialty grains. I already went through the box.
Ah, good, I was wondering!

As for secondary, I won't be going to secondary until about 3 weeks after pitching.
No need for a secondary, really. Just dry hop in your primary 5 days to a week before bottling day (no longer). I'm always concerned about oxidation during racking, the last you want for an IPA, it ruins hop sensation. Just drop the pellets into the carboy, cap with a solid bung, and swirl gently. If you use a bucket don't remove the lid.

The instructions say to add the whole 1 LB of sugar. I will be using the sugar pills from Norther Brewer for bottling so I won't we transferring to a bottling bucket.
Good, less racking! When time comes, tie a piece of sanitized thin muslin fabric around the bottom of your siphon, the end that goes into the fermentor. Keeps the hop fiber out of your bottles.

I would not add that "priming sugar" to the boil at all. Add the sugar after the primary is pretty much done, after about 2 weeks or when it has slowed down significantly. This is mainly to curb production of fusel alcohols in the beginning and to wake up a few more yeasties to finish their work. In a way it gives the yeast a "treat" at the end rather than candy before the work has begun. :D Just boil it with a cup or 2 of water, chill and pour into the fermentor.

One question I have though... Something you mentioned... Am I supposed to add my wort to the fermenter, put in my O2, THEN Pitch? Or add everything THEN O2? Maybe something that doesn't matter... Just wondering.
Add O2 right before pitching. The yeast will then absorb it as soon as they hit the wort. I gather you have an oxygenation stone at the end of the wand? If you see any bubbles on the surface during oxygenation there's too much flow, that's oxygen that didn't get dissolved, crank it down a bit. Swirl/move that wand around slowly to reach all "corners" during that 30 second O2 event. Spread it around.​
 
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Sooooo... After talking it over with the wife.. Another good day that I could brew would be next Friday. Anyway I can use that to my advantage and make my East starter turn out just about perfect? Not sure if that is way too far away for the East since I've already started it. What are your guys thoughts and or methods I should follow?

OR

Just stick to the new plan of add 1L wort to original started and dumping it all in on Sunday?
 

TheMadKing

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Sooooo... After talking it over with the wife.. Another good day that I could brew would be next Friday. Anyway I can use that to my advantage and make my East starter turn out just about perfect? Not sure if that is way too far away for the East since I've already started it. What are your guys thoughts and or methods I should follow?

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Just stick to the new plan of add 1L wort to original started and dumping it all in on Sunday?
You can always just leave it in the fridge for an extra few days before decanting. It won't hurt anything, and will actually help the yeast flocculate more.

I would use the time to your advantage and make a decanted step starter.
 
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ryan810cows

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IslandLizard
In line answers.:) IN GREEN!!

As for secondary, I won't be going to secondary until about 3 weeks after pitching.
No need for a secondary, really. Just dry hop in your primary 5 days to a week before bottling day (no longer). I'm always concerned about oxidation during racking, the last you want for an IPA, it ruins hop sensation. Just drop the pellets into the carboy, cap with a solid bung, and swirl gently. If you use a bucket don't remove the lid.

I think I will try it out with this batch!

The instructions say to add the whole 1 LB of sugar. I will be using the sugar pills from Norther Brewer for bottling so I won't we transferring to a bottling bucket.
Good, less racking! When time comes, tie a piece of sanitized thin muslin fabric around the bottom of your siphon, the end that goes into the fermentor. Keeps the hop fiber out of your bottles.

I would not add that "priming sugar" to the boil at all. Add the sugar after the primary is pretty much done, after about 2 weeks or when it has slowed down significantly. This is mainly to curb production of fusel alcohols in the beginning and to wake up a few more yeasties to finish their work. In a way it gives the yeast a "treat" at the end rather than candy before the work has begun. :D Just boil it with a cup or 2 of water, chill and pour into the fermentor.

OOo Boy... Going off the instructions on my SECOND batch!! I'm scared!! BUT.. I will give it a shot! I don't have a hygrometer so I will wait it out 2 weeks.. THEN add the "Priming Sugar"! That makes sense to give the little Yeasties a treat!

One question I have though... Something you mentioned... Am I supposed to add my wort to the fermenter, put in my O2, THEN Pitch? Or add everything THEN O2? Maybe something that doesn't matter... Just wondering.
Add O2 right before pitching. The yeast will then absorb it as soon as they hit the wort. I gather you have an oxygenation stone at the end of the wand? If you see any bubbles on the surface during oxygenation there's too much flow, that's oxygen that didn't get dissolved, crank it down a bit. Swirl/move that wand around slowly to reach all "corners" during that 30 second O2 event. Spread it around.

GREAT to know! Thanks!
 
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ryan810cows

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You can always just leave it in the fridge for an extra few days before decanting. It won't hurt anything, and will actually help the yeast flocculate more.



I would use the time to your advantage and make a decanted step starter.

So then just add the extra 1L and put on the stir plate for 24?

After the 24, fridge it up until next Friday? I'm still a bit confused still on how to do that part if it's not like I just Sadie above.
 
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ryan810cows

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Well.. I just made the call.. I added a fresh 1L to the original and it's on the stir plate spinning away now... I'll brew Sunday!!
 

IslandLizard

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So my starter bubbled over.. Not a ton.. So I thought this may happen.. So I prepared for the worst with lost of paper towel.. BUT.. Should I worry? I have it still going now and it looks like it calmed down..View attachment 328710
Hey, now you know it's active!

I hoped you'd come up with a gallon jug for the extended starter, that's tight and not a lot of air space. I've had starter blow offs losing as much as half the yeast, multiple times! Achouffe comes to mind. Happens always overnight. Even with a stir plate.

BTW, that's looking pretty good! Pitching an active starter can even awake the dead (fermentations).
 

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5. Return wort to boil. The mixture is now called “wort”,
the brewer’s term for unfermented beer.
-- Add 1 oz Summit hops and boil for 60 minutes.
-- Add 1 oz Chinook hops and 6 lbs dark malt syrup 15 minutes before the end of the boil.
-- Add 1 oz Centennial hops 10 minutes before the end of the boil.
-- Add 1 oz Cascade hops 5 minutes before the end of the boil.
-- Add 1 oz Centennial hops and 1 lb corn sugar at the end of the boil.​

I would wait with adding the last 6 pound of LME until after you're done boiling:
5 minutes before the end of the boil, and just before adding the 5 minute Cascade hops, first ladle some (~1-2 quarts) of your wort into a separate (largish) pot (we'll get back to that in a minute). Then add your 5 minute Cascade hops to the main kettle per instructions and stir.

Now go back to that pot with 1-2 quarts of hot wort. But keep an eye on the clock (set timer!) to turn the flame off on your boiling kettle at "0" minutes and add your 0-minute Centennial hops. Don't forget those!

In the mean time, in that pot, dilute the 6 pound of malt syrup in that hot wort so it gets thinner. Once dissolved you may heat it up a bit, but if you do so do it slowly and carefully. You may heat it to around 180°F, no higher, no need to boil. Again, if you're heating it, be very, very careful NOT to scorch it! In case you need to step away to tend to your main kettle, remove the pot from the heat source.

The main kettle should be done by now. Pour the whole pot of diluted extract back into kettle, and stir well to homogenize the wort. After adding, the wort should be at least 165°F. 180°F is best, a bit higher is fine too.

Let that sit with a lid on it for about 15 minutes, stirring every few minutes. That's called a "hopstand." You could extend that to 30 minutes (or even longer) if you want. All that time more flavor is being extracted from your late addition hops. That's how IPAs are made!

On the last step, when adding your 0-minute Centennial hops:
As I mentioned before, you're still going to wait and add that pound of corn sugar (dissolved, boiled and chilled) directly to the fermentor after 5-7 days, right?
 

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