Ssbrewtech ekettle controller?

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ehk089

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im considering going to single vessel ebiab and am intrigued by the halo coils ability to have a bag rest on it, so I was considering purchasing one of their kettles. The problem is, they have an integrated pt100 temp probe which they state makes it only possible to run off their controller. I like the blichmann brew commander controller better. Does anyone know if that probe could be converted to use in the blichmann controller? Or is anyone using a different probe/controller combo to control their ssbrewtech ekettles?
 

BeardedBrews

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PT100 is the default temperature sensor for almost every PID controller.

It is possible that the headphone jack they're using is wired funny, but you should be able to wire any controller to accept that plug.
 
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ehk089

ehk089

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That’s kiddo what I assumed, just wondering if anyone’s tried using the ekettle with another manufacturers controller before I order and find out for myself.
 

RockfordWhite

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I saw somewhere that somebody rewired a regular temp probe to work with the SS brewtech controller so it’s probably doable the other way around. I can’t remember where I saw it but I recall they had to essentially guess and check
 

RockfordWhite

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I would email them and say you already own a controller but want to use their kettle And see what they say
 

Hwk-I-St8

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I'm not sure you'll get the same safety with respect to the bag resting on the coils with a different controller. Their controller works by adjusting the voltage going to the coil, so it runs at partial power for lower temps. Most other controllers work by rapidly cycling full power off/on to regulate temps.
 
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ehk089

ehk089

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I thought the watt density of the coil was what prevented scorching...
 

Zooksta

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I'm not sure you'll get the same safety with respect to the bag resting on the coils with a different controller. Their controller works by adjusting the voltage going to the coil, so it runs at partial power for lower temps. Most other controllers work by rapidly cycling full power off/on to regulate temps.
You can set the power percentage in mash mode on the Brewcommander, you don't have to run it at 100%.
 
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ehk089

ehk089

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Yeah but they don’t have as low watt density, and aren’t recommended for heating mash because of possible scorching from what I’ve read. I’m pretty sure only ssbrewtech can do that.
 

Bobby_M

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Having the mash plastered up against the element doesnt make sense anyway, scorch or not. I prefer a cheaper ripple element with a false bottom to keep a couple gallons completely liquid for better heating and homogeony. Proprietary elements are expensive to replace when you dry fire.
 

doug293cz

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Yeah but they don’t have as low watt density, and aren’t recommended for heating mash because of possible scorching from what I’ve read. I’m pretty sure only ssbrewtech can do that.
Blichmann elements do have an extremely low watt density. Never heard of scorching with them. They are however proprietary, which means they have all the disadvantages of proprietary hardware (hint: companies introduce proprietary hardware so they can charge higher prices than for commodity hardware, and get "lock-in".)

Brew on :mug:
 

doug293cz

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True, but if it's like most of them, less than 100% doesn't mean it runs at lower power. It means it runs at full power, but at less than 100% of the time.
What's the difference?
With the SSVR that the SSBrewTech controller uses, you don't get full power voltage pulses to the element, since at less than 100% setting, you only get a fraction of each half cycle of the voltage/current waveform. SSR based controllers give variable numbers of full half cycles, so they are at 100% power for the half cycles they are on.

The important question is how fast does the element heat up when voltage is applied. If it takes ~5 seconds for the element to reach max temp, then an SSR with a cycle time of 1 second will be pretty much indistinguishable from an SSVR. However, if the element only takes 1/2 second to reach max temp, then you would get noticeable temp pulsing with the SSR, but not the SSVR. With the elements we typically use, a one second PID control period does not give significant pulsing, but pulsing can sometimes be noticed with a two second control period, and can become an issue with longer than two second control periods.

Brew on :mug:
 

Bobby_M

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With the SSVR that the SSBrewTech controller uses, you don't get full power voltage pulses to the element, since at less than 100% setting, you only get a fraction of each half cycle of the voltage/current waveform. SSR based controllers give variable numbers of full half cycles, so they are at 100% power for the half cycles they are on.

The important question is how fast does the element heat up when voltage is applied. If it takes ~5 seconds for the element to reach max temp, then an SSR with a cycle time of 1 second will be pretty much indistinguishable from an SSVR. However, if the element only takes 1/2 second to reach max temp, then you would get noticeable temp pulsing with the SSR, but not the SSVR. With the elements we typically use, a one second PID control period does not give significant pulsing, but pulsing can sometimes be noticed with a two second control period, and can become an issue with longer than two second control periods.

Brew on :mug:
Agree on all points. The question becomes, what is the practical advantage of being able to SSVR an output other than allowing the bag to touch. I contend that you wont have very good temp homogeneity between the element and probe without some level of liquidity below the bag. In that regard, having granular max output control is only a little clever compared to the commander which does have max output based on cycle time.
 
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