Spunding Valve Question

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upheaval

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Greetings, I haven’t been able to find a thing on what I’m looking for, so I’m hoping someone out there will have answer.

I just brewed a batch of beer and have it all transferred into my new fermentasaurus with the pressure kit. I also purchased the spunding valve, and that’s why my question comes in. Should I connect it immediately? Should I open the valve, or wait for pressure to build up? I’m really confused how I’m suppose to dial this thing in. Any help is greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance
 

jaymosbeershack

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Greetings, I haven’t been able to find a thing on what I’m looking for, so I’m hoping someone out there will have answer.

I just brewed a batch of beer and have it all transferred into my new fermentasaurus with the pressure kit. I also purchased the spunding valve, and that’s why my question comes in. Should I connect it immediately? Should I open the valve, or wait for pressure to build up? I’m really confused how I’m suppose to dial this thing in. Any help is greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance
I always hook up a blow off tube(hose with gas ball lock to a jug of sani) till i see activity, then hook up the spunding valve. Normally 12-24 hours after pitching. This way im sure the fermenter won't dent inward as the yeast breaths in.
As far as dialing it in, just keep an eye on it. I slowly turned mine in till i got to where i wanted it. The factory markings show 30 psi when the gauge shows 14 on mine
 

Dland

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If I understand your question; I do a primary fermentation with blow off tube, when fermentation begins to slow a bit, I do a trub dump and gravity reading, (or just take reading if no conical). When it is mostly fermented, but still active, I rack to kegs and then attach spunding valves to kegs. Use fermentaion volume chart to determine what PSI you want to set spunding valve, based on temperature of room you have kegs in. This time of year, with cellar around 74F, I have my spunding valves set to around 33-35PSI.
 

MAC80

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Greetings, I haven’t been able to find a thing on what I’m looking for, so I’m hoping someone out there will have answer.

I just brewed a batch of beer and have it all transferred into my new fermentasaurus with the pressure kit. I also purchased the spunding valve, and that’s why my question comes in. Should I connect it immediately? Should I open the valve, or wait for pressure to build up? I’m really confused how I’m suppose to dial this thing in. Any help is greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance
I hooked up the spunding valve as soon as I sealed the fermentasaurus and had it set to 30 on the one I have. Sounds like I have the same one jaymosbeershack has. I knew where to set mine because I had tested the vessel with co2 before brew day and used the gauge to figure what would get close to about 10psi. This is the pressure I have seen most people use on the fermentasaurus.

This is my first brew so it might have been better to use jaymosbeershack's method. It took about 26 hrs before the krausen started to form but it seems to be ok
 

mongoose33

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I always hook up a blow off tube(hose with gas ball lock to a jug of sani) till i see activity, then hook up the spunding valve. Normally 12-24 hours after pitching. This way im sure the fermenter won't dent inward as the yeast breaths in.
Not sure what this means....as long as you have an open line to the star-san, there's no way you're going to build up negative pressure so the fermenter dents inward.

I'm not sure what you mean by the yeast breathing in; yeast produce CO2, and that's what causes the airlock to bubble. The only way I can think of for a fermenter to dent inward is during something like a cold crash when the headspace gas contracts due to chilling, creating a partial vacuum.

I *have* heard of concern about a stainless fermenter being sealed with hot cleaning solution in it, and when the solution cools it creates a partial vacuum which might damage the fermenter. Same principle as cold crashing.
 

jaymosbeershack

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Not sure what this means....as long as you have an open line to the star-san, there's no way you're going to build up negative pressure so the fermenter dents inward.

I'm not sure what you mean by the yeast breathing in; yeast produce CO2, and that's what causes the airlock to bubble. The only way I can think of for a fermenter to dent inward is during something like a cold crash when the headspace gas contracts due to chilling, creating a partial vacuum.

I *have* heard of concern about a stainless fermenter being sealed with hot cleaning solution in it, and when the solution cools it creates a partial vacuum which might damage the fermenter. Same principle as cold crashing.
Ive had noticable suck back durring the yeast lag. I was guessing it was due to the yeast consuming o2 durring reproduction. Im sure it wouldnt build enough pressure to damage the tank, but when working under pressure i try to be overly careful, so i hook up the blow off for a day to make sure it wont damage the tank.
 

mongoose33

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Ive had noticable suck back durring the yeast lag. I was guessing it was due to the yeast consuming o2 durring reproduction. Im sure it wouldnt build enough pressure to damage the tank, but when working under pressure i try to be overly careful, so i hook up the blow off for a day to make sure it wont damage the tank.
Unless I misunderstand how you're doing this, you don't have a tank under pressure as long as you have a blowoff hose in Star-San. Any reduction in pressure in the fermenter would draw that Star-san up in the hose.

This, BTW, is one reason I like airlocks.
 

jaymosbeershack

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Unless I misunderstand how you're doing this, you don't have a tank under pressure as long as you have a blowoff hose in Star-San. Any reduction in pressure in the fermenter would draw that Star-san up in the hose.

This, BTW, is one reason I like airlocks.
Not having the tank under pressure is the point of using the blow off for the first day. This way it isnt sealed till i know its making co2. And the tube is plenty long that starsan won't make it to the fermenter.
 
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