spontaneous fermentation?!?

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So I brewed an Octoberfest on Sunday. I made a starter Saturday night which I finally felt was ready to pitch on Tuesday (using WL Octoberfest lager yeast). Meanwhile the wort was sitting at 72 degrees in a storage closet. When I went to pitch the yeast I found a krausen in the fermenter.

The carboy I used had been thoroughly cleaned with B-brite, and then sanitized with Star-san prior to filling with the wort.

My starter was also in this storage closet, but not adjacent to the carboy filled with wort.

Any clue as to what just happened would be appreciated.
 

Got Trub?

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Your wort was contaminated somewhere during your process. How do you chill your wort? Was your wort ever open to the air after the cooling process was begun? What is your carboy made of and is it old and scratched up?

GT
 

JuanMoore

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Normally a healthy amount of the yeast of your choice is able to dominate over any small amount of wild yeast or bacteria that may be present. Without that large amount of yeast present, it's open season for any organisms that may have gotten in there. Even with proper sanitation, leaving your wort alone without pitching for more than ~24 hours is just asking for an infection. You've probably made a wild ale with whatever yeast was able to take hold.
 

Powers

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pitch the other yeast and see what happens?! :drunk:
 
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G
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I'm using an immersion chiller but with ground water temps near 80 degrees, it takes forever to cool. Once the wort got down to about 90 degrees (one hour) I left it in my chest freezer until it dropped to 75. (about 3 more hours) It was in a converted keg / kettle with a lid on it, but not airtight by any means. It was transferred to a glass carboy.

Long story short - dump this batch and start over? Preferably when its not 98 degrees outside.
 

Powers

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if you need the equipment, then i guess you could dump. although the scientist in me says keep it going to see how it turns out. you may have yeast from a past batch activated, or it may be a wild strain. i know new belgian has some sour browns, so it could turn out to be something very interesting ;)
 

BrewSpook

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If you decide to keep it going, make sure you slant some of the yeast when you bottle/keg it. If it turns out good you would need that wild yeast strain to recreate it...
 
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