Speidel Braumeister (brewmaster)

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clasley

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Just checked my notes. The gravity at the end of the first mash was 8.6 brix. The gravity after the second mash was 17.4 brix. Again I split the 16 lb grain bill into two 8 lb mashes and didn't sparge so looking at the numbers I would say both mashes contributed roughly equally.

-Chris
 

bullsneck

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Has anyone here measured their Braumeisters with a ruler with water in it? So they can ascertain how much water they have by simply chucking a stainless steel ruler in and taking a reading. My old kettle used to be 1.13cm to the litre but I have no idea what a Braumeister 20L is per litre.
 

Yambor44

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Just checked my notes. The gravity at the end of the first mash was 8.6 brix. The gravity after the second mash was 17.4 brix. Again I split the 16 lb grain bill into two 8 lb mashes and didn't sparge so looking at the numbers I would say both mashes contributed roughly equally.

-Chris
Good to know Chris since I may end up with a 20 before long. :p :mug:
 

beefeater

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Has anyone here measured their Braumeisters with a ruler with water in it? So they can ascertain how much water they have by simply chucking a stainless steel ruler in and taking a reading. My old kettle used to be 1.13cm to the litre but I have no idea what a Braumeister 20L is per litre.
Close enough to 1 liter pr cm. I just use a metering stick when measuring the contents of it. Dumped exactly 10 liters in there and measured once. Don't remember exactly what the reading was but I figured it was close enough. As long as I allways use the stick it'll be consistent anyways.
 

bach

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I am thinking about brewing lager with no sparge technique.
So, I probably can't do a true no sparge mash on BM ?
Because of recirculation ?
Or does it matter? Would it still leach tannins, etc
I have never done no sparge mash - lot of brewers recommend it
to obtain the true malty flavor.

Have you guys done experiments with no sparge on BM ?
And if I try that I need to use more water.
For my last version of Czech lager I use 4.3kg of malt.
If the grain absorbs roughly 4l of water, I would need to use
about 29l of water to end up with preboil 25l and post boil 22l.
Is it too much water? Is it over the top of malt pipe ? The malt pipe is 36cm tall..

Bach
 

bullsneck

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Close enough to 1 liter pr cm. I just use a metering stick when measuring the contents of it. Dumped exactly 10 liters in there and measured once. Don't remember exactly what the reading was but I figured it was close enough. As long as I allways use the stick it'll be consistent anyways.
Yeah, did a quick check and got 1.1cm per litre.
 

Yambor44

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Awesome videos! Thanks fr taking the time to put these up. I noticed your hops in the bag looked a little full or tight. I have noticed when I bag mine up too tight when they swell the wort doesn't move as freely around them all and my utilization is lower.

Great job on the gravity. I thought I heard you mention you were chilling to 21c. If so, by the time you took your sample of wort for the reading, it could have been 70-71 degrees which would have given you one more point to 1.055.

And last but not least....I gotta get me one of those oven mits in the second video! :p

Thanks again!!

Rob
 

limulus

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Very nice videos. Do you guys know if they have made any improvements to their packaging? I know that all the damaged parts were replaced, but I hate to drop $2k on something only to have it damaged when I receive it. It would not be so bad if you did not have to wait a month to receive it and then a couple of additional weeks for replacement parts.

I will be removing a wall in my basement in February and adding a bar. This is still the system I want.
 

Yambor44

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I did a reiterated mash this past weekend on my SBM20L. The total grain bill was around 16 lbs split into two 8 lb mashes. I manually controlled the SBM and did a single infusion for both mashes. At the end of the first mash I emptied the malt tube, rinsed it off and started the second mash using the runoff from the first. I had more issues with the second mash with some grain getting into the pump and a geyser but worked it out. It didn't add much time to my day and was quite a bit easier than I expected.

On the copper hood - I've used it the past few sessions and have to say I like it. I get a much better boil and a consistent 10%/hour boil-off using it. My only remaining concern is DMS. Oh and fermcap-s and hop bags are pretty much a necessity to prevent foaming and boil overs.

-Chris

Chris,

When you manually control the BM, does the unit do an automatic pump rest or did you do that manually as well? If so what was your time frame to rest and for how long?

Thanks,

Rob
 

clasley

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When you manually control the BM, does the unit do an automatic pump rest or did you do that manually as well? If so what was your time frame to rest and for how long?
I didn't notice any pump rests in manual mode. It was running the entire mash except for the switch from the first to second grain bill.

-Chris
 

atax1c

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Very nice videos. Do you guys know if they have made any improvements to their packaging? I know that all the damaged parts were replaced, but I hate to drop $2k on something only to have it damaged when I receive it. It would not be so bad if you did not have to wait a month to receive it and then a couple of additional weeks for replacement parts.

I will be removing a wall in my basement in February and adding a bar. This is still the system I want.
This is exactly what I was wondering as well..
 

rowanb

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This is exactly what I was wondering as well..
I live in Australia & recently had a 20 litre sent FedEx from Germany via craftbrewer.com.au. Everything internal was tied and taped, so nothing could rattle & cause scratches/dings. The packaging seemed fine and it arrived in perfect condition. The only problem I had was getting the driver to allow me to remove it from the box and check it over before signing off - no way was I going to take it sight unseen. I've used it a few times now and it runs well. I've been brewing all-grain with insulated mashtuns & an electric boiler for 10 years. If this had been available when I started, and if I'd had the money, I would have bought it.
 

limulus

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I live in Australia & recently had a 20 litre sent FedEx from Germany via craftbrewer.com.au. Everything internal was tied and taped, so nothing could rattle & cause scratches/dings. The packaging seemed fine and it arrived in perfect condition. The only problem I had was getting the driver to allow me to remove it from the box and check it over before signing off - no way was I going to take it sight unseen. I've used it a few times now and it runs well. I've been brewing all-grain with insulated mashtuns & an electric boiler for 10 years. If this had been available when I started, and if I'd had the money, I would have bought it.
Thanks for the report.
 

traveler2

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Hey guys, I've been reading this thread for most of a week now and deciced to order my 50L this morning. I've been brewing all-grain for more than a few years now and in the back of mind always thought there had to be a way to do it in one vessel - low and behold the good people at Speidel engineered it and you all have validated their design! Thanks so much for all that you have documented in this thread. I only hope I can give some back in the weeks to come...:mug:
 

stevedasleeve

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Hey guys, I've been reading this thread for most of a week now and deciced to order my 50L this morning. I've been brewing all-grain for more than a few years now and in the back of mind always thought there had to be a way to do it in one vessel - low and behold the good people at Speidel engineered it and you all have validated their design! Thanks so much for all that you have documented in this thread. I only hope I can give some back in the weeks to come...:mug:
Yes my sentiments exactly (and experience!) I am ordering soon I think. Though... hmmm... so expensive... OK maybe...



!!!
 

DeGarre

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Thanks guys - good to see you liked my videos. I think there is some educational value too, for example, I have the smaller unit and one can see that the suction is quite strong in that too, let alone in the 50L unit. Also, having lifted the malt pipe I was a bit stuck standing on a chair and trying to figure out out a nice way of getting off without breaking my back and neck. It's a long step down with a heavy malt pipe...

But more importantly, brew day tomorrow! Single hop Simcoe Pale Ale, first time I'll be using a bit of wheat.
 

traveler2

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Ok guys, while I'm waiting for delivery and knowing the critical path to brew day upon delivery is the euro to US electrical connection, the engineer in me says we must be able to find sourcing for this simple 250V/30A/50Hz extension cord to 220V/30A/60Hz 4-prong dryer plug. Sure, DIY is acceptable, but most prefer not to get zapped and are willing to pay a little $$ to have someone manufacture the cord for them. I'm scouring the internet and local sources, and believe if I can't find it pre-assembled and off the shelf, then it's probably a $$ making opportunity. Anyone feel the same?
 

clex25

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I'm scouring the internet and local sources, and believe if I can't find it pre-assembled and off the shelf, then it's probably a $$ making opportunity. Anyone feel the same?
As I mentioned not too long ago, it is incredibly simple to put together yourself. The dryer (heavy gauge) extension cords are already available. The only thing you must do is cut the included plug off, and strip the wires a little. A new plug to match your 220V (dryer) outlet at home can be found cheap at any hardware store (lowes, home depot...etc).

The assembly only requires one to place the wires in 3 grooves, and screw them down. That is literally all one must do. There is no soldering or anything like that required.

Of course, it would be wise to use a multimeter to check all the connections, but even with limited experience, this is really easy to do. Plus you have everyone here to help!

Hopefully Speidel will offer a US plug in the near future. Bottom line though, I seriously doubt that you would make any kind of money on simply assembling some power cords. Also, you would assume some amount of risk if you damage someone's $2k unit, or possibly even their house/ electrical system.
 

beefeater

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Anyone using the updated all metal filters? Anyway to get them in the USA?
I ordered them as soon as my norwegian vendor made them available and have been using them asis without any modifications (20l) since with no issues. They're good.

All new models are shipped with them.
 

diegobonatto

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Just checked my notes. The gravity at the end of the first mash was 8.6 brix. The gravity after the second mash was 17.4 brix. Again I split the 16 lb grain bill into two 8 lb mashes and didn't sparge so looking at the numbers I would say both mashes contributed roughly equally.

-Chris
Hello Chris, I think that you performed a "doble-doble" mashing technique with BM, right? I would like to ask if somebody here try a "doble-doble" technique, but you just answered my question before I made it.....:mug:
 

Redstag

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The european 220 wire is quite small in diameter and the US 220 plug is made to accept a much larger gauge wire.
So I figured I would need to beef up the euro wire so the US plug could be attached and secured safely.

First I cut the European plug off in a way to use the portion next to the plug
so it could be used to make the euro wire thick enough
to be secured buy the larger 220 plug wire support.012.jpg

Next I threaded the euro wire through a section of 10 gauge sleeve that I had removed to expose
the wires for the 10 gauge wire extencion cord that I needed to make.014.jpg

I drilled out the part cut from the euro plug to be able to go over the sleeve from the 220 euro wire.
The inside had been molded to accept just the wires and was not large enough in diameter to go over the 220 euro wire sleeve.

I Threaded on the part cut from the euro plug (small end first) over the wires and sleeve
to make the portion close to the 220 plug big enough to be captured by the 220 wire keeper.
(green plastic part in the US 220 plug)015.jpg

I then wired the 220 plug with the green and yellow wire connected to the negative
as suggested in an earlier post.016.jpg

Then connect the other two wires to their respective parts of the plug and tested with a volt meter… Before plugging into the Braumeister.
 

clex25

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Is it possible to run a breumeister off a 110 to 220 Converter?. I have no access to 220 where I live.

Thanks.
I would strongly recommend against it for a couple of reasons.

First, as is stated in the product descriptions which you linked "Caution:
(1) This voltage converter may not work properly [...] some items with heating element such as coffeemakers, espresso/capuccino makers, percolators, heating pads, toasters, toaster ovens, rice cookers, tea kettles, hot plates, cloth irons, steamers etc."

...which is exactly what the braumeister is, a large hot plate essentially. So basically these would not be guaranteed to work in the first place.

Furthermore, you would need to buy a unit that is at LEAST 2000W, since that is the power requirement of just the heating element. If they can be used continuously at 80% you are looking at needing a 3000W supply. The money you spend on this unit plus the extra power you would be using might help offset the cost of hiring an electrician to add a 220v circuit and outlet to your residence.

No dryer in your place? No way to perhaps make an extension cord?
 

clex25

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The european 220 wire is quite small in diameter and the US 220 plug is made to accept a much larger gauge wire.
So I figured I would need to beef up the euro wire so the US plug could be attached and secured safely.
Wow, that was much more involved than what I did! Mine came with a rubber grommet that I just fed the braumeister wire through. I like the pictures and description; it will be useful for anyone who hasn't done the conversion before.
 

bach

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Just an update for those of you interested:
Even though I do not think that BM can do a true no sparge mash becuase of
recirculation, I tried to avoid sparge:
I brewed Schwartzbier.
I found, that I can fill the kettle with 27-28L - that is about max you can
do to avoid the level outside the malt pipe overflow.
My grain bill was 5kg.
I did a step mash with double decoction - first decoction between 131-144 and second between 144-158dg.
The mash was thin about 5:1.
The preboil volume was only about 23L(the grain held about 5L of H2O), so I actually sparged with just 2L to get to preboil ~25L and post boil about 21L
My efficiency was 84% -- too high for no sparge
I ended up with 14Plato - and had to dilute down to 12P.
will see how the beer comes out.
 

cyberbackpacker

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Wow... a few things--

-You did sparge, when you added the 2L post mash, so your post title is a bit odd/puzzling. If you did not add the 2L post mash, you would have achieved your no sparge brew! :)

-The Braumeister is indeed a no-sparge system as it comes out of the box. You can choose to sparge, but it is not necessary.

-Recirculation is not sparging, it is exactly as it states-- moving (recirculating) the wort/liquor that is already present-- that is it.

-When a brewer does a decoction mash, higher efficiency is generally achieved.

But, good on you. Are you doing a true lager Scharwzbier, or using an ale yeast? If Lager yeast, how are you managing fermentation temps?

:mug:
 

NWMushroom

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I don't see anyone mention the possibility of using the stove outlet rather than a dryer outlet? I would prefer to brew in the kitchen and pulled out the electric stove to find an outlet that looked just the same as the one used for my dryer in the basement.

Thoughts?
 

bach

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Wow... a few things--

-You did sparge, when you added the 2L post mash, so your post title is a bit odd/puzzling. If you did not add the 2L post mash, you would have achieved your no sparge brew! :)

-The Braumeister is indeed a no-sparge system as it comes out of the box. You can choose to sparge, but it is not necessary.

-Recirculation is not sparging, it is exactly as it states-- moving (recirculating) the wort/liquor that is already present-- that is it.

-When a brewer does a decoction mash, higher efficiency is generally achieved.

But, good on you. Are you doing a true lager Scharwzbier, or using an ale yeast? If Lager yeast, how are you managing fermentation temps?

:mug:
Your point well taken.
My point of view was this:
So how different is wart flow through the grain as opposed to water flow through the grain and is there any data on difference in extraction of tannins?
Gordon Strong, Jamil and others recommend no sparge in order to achieve really malty beer.
What I am concerned about is that the recirculation causes flow through the grain bed, which may extract also more tannins.

But, you are right, as an experiment, it was not conducted well:
1. I should not have sparged
2. I should have only diluted

I am typically using WY 2124 for my Schwartz
 

wyzazz

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I don't see anyone mention the possibility of using the stove outlet rather than a dryer outlet? I would prefer to brew in the kitchen and pulled out the electric stove to find an outlet that looked just the same as the one used for my dryer in the basement.

Thoughts?
It'll work just fine, no worries.
 

DeGarre

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Bumping up to say I look forward to see and hear RobMeister's review on the new 20 litre baby. I am having now Aventinus Weizen Eisbock 12%...peace baby...:drunk:
 

cyberbackpacker

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So how different is wart flow through the grain as opposed to water flow through the grain and is there any data on difference in extraction of tannins?
Gordon Strong, Jamil and others recommend no sparge in order to achieve really malty beer.
What I am concerned about is that the recirculation causes flow through the grain bed, which may extract also more tannins.
First, as a bit of an anecdote. It is a matter of common practice that professional and home brewers stir the mash... you are doing the same thing with the mash liquor in recirculation (for all intents and purposes) as happens to the mash liquor from stirring.

Very (VERY) simply, the big difference between recirculation with wort versus (fly) sparging with water is that when you are recirculating your mash is that your starch/sugar levels are equalized throughout the mash and the pH remains (essentially) constant. When you start to (fly) sparge, your sugar/water ratio starts to drastically change, and your pH level begins to increase. That is why it is essential to monitor pH and/or gravity when fly sparging so you do not extract tannins.

You may have noticed, that I indicated fly-sparging above. Batch sparging does not (in general) risk the extraction of tannins that could happen with fly-sparging if you sparge too much while fly sparging because again of the measured volumes of sparge water and equalization of the mash.

Lastly, you are correct that many people suggest a no-sparge (full volume no sparge that is) for enhanced maltiness, and I agree.

The threat of any extraction of tannins through recirculation is just not an issue.

Gut luck!

:mug:
 
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